IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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What kind of tablet does $5,000 get you? | PCWorld

What kind of tablet does $5,000 get you? | PCWorld | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Can your tablet withstand a 2-meter drop or be submerged in water for 30 minutes and keep functioning? The new $5,000 tablets from Xplore Technologies can.

The DMSR and the military-focused DMSR M2 are the highest performers in Xplore’s new XC6 line, and both have eye-popping hardware and durability features. A more basic XC6 model starts at US$3,299, but the DMSR tablets, priced at $5,299 and $5,599, have better components and screens.

The DMSR models both have handles and are encased in tough protective covers. They can be dropped more than 2 meters onto a plywood floor and 1.2 meters onto concrete, and can operate in temperatures between -30 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit (-34 to 60 degrees Celsius). They’ve been tested to the U.S. military’s tough MIL-STD-810G standard for extreme conditions.

The tablets run Windows and come with Intel’s latest Core i5 or i7 Haswell processors. Solid-state drive options extend to 480GB. Few other tablets offer more than 128GB, with an exception being Razer’s $999 Edge Pro gaming tablet, which has a 256GB SSD.

The DMSR and DMSR M2 have many common features, including 10.4-inch rainproof screens. They display images at 1024 x 768 resolution. That’s less than some cheaper Windows tablets, but Xplore claims to offer excellent LCD visibility in sunlight thanks to a display luminescence of 1,300 NITS.

The tablets have internal fans but can still run for up to eight-and-a-half hours on a 10-cell battery, Xplore said. They weigh a hefty 2.4 kilograms.

Other features include Intel’s GT2-4400 integrated graphics, two USB 3.0 ports, and RJ-45 ethernet and microSD slots. Wireless options include 802.11ac Wi-Fi and a slot for connectivity to AT&T’s LTE network. Display connectivity options include HDMI and VGA ports.

The DMSR M2 adds a Common Access Card slot, used by the military to read data from smart cards based on security clearance. The M2 also has U.S. military clearance to be used on the front lines and on fixed-wing aircraft, according to a specification sheet.

The tablet can also be used to operate and view images from a drone, said Mark Holleran, Xplore president and chief operating officer.

The company’s tablets were used for chemical and radiation detection during the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011, and are commercially used by AT&T and other companies in the field. The durability keeps maintenance costs down, and the company provides a three-year warranty.

The military won’t use standard Windows tablets in the field and Xplore has to design its own motherboards. The redesign involved shrinking a motherboard to tablet size and using industrial parts that can withstand high temperatures and vibration, Holleran said.

The Windows 8.1 option isn’t popular with customers, many of whom downgrade.

“Most buy Windows 8.1, but they ask us to ship it with a Windows 7 BIOS,” Holleran said.

The cheaper XC6 DML model, starting at $3,299, and the XC6 DM, starting at $3,999, also have rugged features but use an Intel Celeron 2980U processor and come with less storage. They also don’t offer the same visibility in sunlight as the DMSR tablets.




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Breaking News: Meaningful Use is Not Covering Costs | EMR and HIPAA

Breaking News: Meaningful Use is Not Covering Costs | EMR and HIPAA | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

In one of my recent interviews with a healthcare IT consulting company, they revealed some breaking news for those of us in the EHR world. They told me point blank that:

Meaningful Use is Not Covering Costs

Ok, so that’s not really breaking news. Although, it seems that very few people want to actually articulate this point. It almost feels like heresy that someone would “complain” about the fact that the government is spending $36 billion on EHR incentives and that the money isn’t enough to cover the implementation of these EHR systems.

Actually, I should clarify that last point. The EHR incentive money is covering the costs to purchase the systems. It’s not covering the costs of implementing those EHR systems and then poking, prodding and otherwise cajoling end users to show meaningful use of that system (not to be confused with meaningfully using the system).

Let me also be clear that I’m not complaining about the EHR incentive money. I’ve done enough of that previously. What I’m just trying to acknowledge is something that everyone who deals with the EHR budget already realizes, but no one seems to want to say it. Organizations are spending more money on EHR and meaningful use than they’re getting from the government.

I think this is important for a couple reasons. First, many organizations didn’t budget any EHR money beyond what the EHR incentive money. You can certainly argue this was a mistake on their part, but that’s going to leave a bunch of organizations in a lurch. We’re already seeing the fall out of this as news reports keep coming out about hospitals systems in financial trouble due to the costs of their EHR system. Plus, in each of these cases, it seems their costs continue to balloon out of control with no end in sight. It makes me wonder if the compressed meaningful use timeline is partially to blame for a rushed implementation and poor EHR implementation and cost planning.

Second, there is still a swash of providers and organizations that haven’t yet implemented their EHR. If you can’t support the cost of EHR with government money, how does that bode for those who won’t be getting any EHR incentive money? One could make the argument that they’ll actually be in a better position since they won’t have to worry about meaningful use and can just focus on getting value out of their EHR. Hopefully that’s the case, but many of the meaningful use functions are now hardcoded into the EHR systems. Even if an organization isn’t planning on attesting to meaningful use, that doesn’t mean they won’t be forced by their EHR software to do a bunch of things they wouldn’t have done otherwise.

What are you seeing from your perspective? Is the EHR incentive money covering the costs of an EHR implementation? What are the impacts if it doesn’t?



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HIStalk Advisory Panel: IT Service Management | HIStalk

HIStalk Advisory Panel: IT Service Management | HIStalk | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

The HIStalk Advisory Panel is a group of hospital CIOs, hospital CMIOs, practicing physicians, and a few vendor executives who have volunteered to provide their thoughts on topical industry issues. I’ll seek their input every month or so on an important news developments and also ask the non-vendor members about their recent experience with vendors. E-mail me to suggest an issue for their consideration.

If you work for a hospital or practice, you are welcome to join the panel. I am grateful to the HIStalk Advisory Panel members for their help in making HIStalk better.

This question this time: Does your organization use a formal IT service management program such as ITIL, and if so, what results have you seen?

Responses indicating no: 4.

[from a practicing physician] No , I am not aware of any formal IT management program used by my now very large company, but that is not to say that they do not need one.

We started with one, but we didn’t have the institutional memory to keep it alive. As new people came, it became increasingly difficult. Some good remnants remain, but only if somebody remembers to enforce them.

Yes and no. We’re a small shop, so we use ITIL and other models as a source of best practices and implement what makes sense for us. We don’t want to reinvent the wheel, but a full-scale implementation in a small organization is not cost-effective. The processes, templates, etc., that we have pulled in are extremely useful and allow us to more efficiently manage a large workload with a small team.

Not at this time. We have evaluated the use of ITIL and COBIT, but our plates are too full at this time to put any formal processes in place. Luckily the management team has experience with ITIL, so we apply the concepts to change management and service delivery as much as possible.

We have begun to install ITIL. It has been challenging given we are short on resources and when busy, people tend to fall back into the old way of doing things. We have had success with incident management, which is a good thing.

I was one of the first to enthusiastically jump on the ITIL bandwagon, many years ago, then I saw firsthand how the ITIL process became the goal, not a means to a goal. After two ITIL implementation attempts with two different teams, in which internal client satisfaction with IS declined and my employees became demoralized drones, I threw away any philosophy to implement the details of ITIL and instead focused on the concepts and the end goals. Those end goals are (1) internal customer satisfaction with IS; (2) IS employee satisfaction; and (3) achievement of both #1 and #2 at the lowest possible IS budget.  Since then, I’ve watched ITIL spread to other organizations and watched the same pattern that I experienced. There seems to be an inverse relationship, or at least a tipping point of inflection, between dogmatic adherence to ITIL and IS success and creativity.

At this time we don’t have a formal service structure methodology. We are beginning to look at this due to our organization growing and that all areas now have a major IT component. We most likely would lean towards ITIL.

Yes, we do. If you agree that using ITIL can be helpful and that every part of ITIL may not apply to your operations, it can provide consistency in support that many organizations need. We have found that it is helpful in many aspects of providing end-user services more consistently and more timely with much fewer variations.

We do not use ITIL formally. We will soon be joining a larger system and they have adopted ITIL and we are comparing our current practices to this framework.

We have been trained in the basics of ITIL and have incorporated several concepts and processes. We have not gone full out at this point.



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It's official: Nokia's phone business will become Microsoft's on April 25 | PCWorld

It's official: Nokia's phone business will become Microsoft's on April 25 | PCWorld | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it
It's official: Nokia's phone business will become Microsoft's on April 25
Brad Chacos @BradChacos
  • Apr 21, 2014 8:22 AM
  • print

The end is nigh. Or is that a new beginning? Either way you look at it, Microsoft on Monday announced that its $7 billion acquisition of Nokia's phone business will finally close this Friday, April 25, after regulatory delays slowed the deal.

Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith also revealed some additional agreements hammered out in the months since the acquisition's announcement. Most revolve around behind-the-scenes personnel and manufacturing details, but of particular note is that Microsoft will handle the nokia.com website and Nokia's social media presence for up to a year, despite the fact that the rest of Nokia is carrying on as a separate company.

Stephen Elop, the Nokia CEO who arrived at the company by way of Microsoft, will return to the Redmond company as part of the deal, where he will assume control of Microsoft's hardware division. He's just one of approximately 32,000 Nokia employees making the jump to Microsoft.

Ch-ch-ch-changes

Microsoft's Nokia buyout comes in the middle of a gargantuan shift for Microsoft, which—in addition to recently replacing its CEO—is transitioning from a traditional software company to something more device- and services-oriented.

While both Nokia's Lumia line and Windows Phone as a platform have struggled to compete with the dual Android/Apple mobile juggernaut, Microsoft has said that phones are the key to everything in today's tightly controlled ecosystems. While we're skeptical that buying Nokia will pay off for Windows Phone's prospects, the hard-won lessons that the intensely consumer-focused Nokia can teach Microsoft could help transform the business that Bill Gates built into something great again, one Nokia phone at a time.

Image: Jon Phillips

Nokia's Stephen Elop at Microsoft's Build 2014 keynote.

Windows Phone itself is on the upswing right now, at least in the hearts and minds of developers, if not everyday users. At its recent Build conference, Microsoft announced a trio of announcements designed to drive a jolt of energy into its mobile ecosystem, starting with the vastly improved Windows 8.1 update, which adds a much-needed notification center and Cortana, the surprisingly useful digital assistant. Between those and the numerous other features baked into the update, Windows Phone is finally a full-fledged OS capable of taking on Android and iPhone—at least as far as the core experience is concerned. In other words, Windows Phone 8.1 finally provides a level of software polished enough to match well with Nokia's impeccable hardware designs.

Microsoft also announced universal Windows apps, which allow developers to create a single app, then easily push it out across Windows Phones, PCs, and tablets, complete with the option for users to buy the app once and have it run on any platform. The first of those have already begun appearing in Microsoft's app stores. Microsoft also now provides the Windows Phone operating system for free to phone manufacturers, as well—a move that can both push WP8 adoption and quell any discontent about Microsoft snapping up Nokia.

With all the focus on Windows Phone, though, one big question remains: What will Microsoft do with Nokia's recently announced Nokia X phones, which run on a heavily modified version of Android chock full of Microsoft services? Given Microsoft's newfound services focus—as exemplified by Office for iPadMicrosoft may just let the experiment play out, at least for a while.




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Best Laptops for Productivity | Computer Hardware Reviews - ThinkComputers.org

Best Laptops for Productivity | Computer Hardware Reviews - ThinkComputers.org | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

We are starting a new series of articles here on ThinkComputers. We define our “Mobile Arsenal” as what we would recommend to you for your mobile setup. Many of us are traveling all the time and we need to be able to be productive on the road. After using quite a lot of different types of mobile products and applications we are going to focus on the best and present them to you here.

Today we will be focusing on laptops. This is of course the core of being productive while on the road. For our Mobile Arsenal we are going to recommend laptops that are great for doing work and getting things done. If you are looking for a gaming laptop or something else we are not going to recommend that here. So let’s get started.

Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro

I am actually using this laptop as my current main laptop and I love it. The screen resolution on the Yoga 2 Pro is the main reason I use it. At 3200 x 1800 that is more than enough room for multi-tasking, working with larger images and HD video. Another cool thing about the Yoga 2 Pro is that the screen itself can be flipped completely over so you can use it as a tablet, have it propped up and more. This is perfect for the plane ride and has many of other applications as well. The Yoga I have has the Intel Core i5-4200U in it and it can handle pretty much anything I throw at it (Photoshop, Premiere, HD video, etc). As far as battery life goes you are going to get anywhere from 5-7 hours, which is pretty much any continental flight in the US.

The Yoga 2 Pro starts at $999 and prices go up from there depending on what options you want.

ASUS Zenbook Infinity

When ASUS announced the Zenbook Infinity it was all the buzz because the lid and the area around the keyboard is made of Corning Gorilla Glass 3. So as you can guess this is one pretty sexy looking laptop. Beyond that the 13.3-inch Ultrabook has a 2560 x 1440 IGZO panel and has a configuration that with the Intel Core i7-4558U processor and Iris 5100 graphics. That means you can pretty much throw anything at this Ultrabook and it will be able to handle it pretty well. This is of course a more high-end offering, but one of the best out there at 13.3-inches. Just like the Yoga 2 Pro you should get anywhere from 5-7 hours of battery life out of the Zenbook Infinity.

The ASUS Zenbook Infinity starts at $1499 and prices go up from there.

Acer Aspire S7

This has to be one of the best designed laptops that I’ve had the chance to get my hands on. Acer actually offers this Ultrabook with an aluminum chassis and glass lid or a fully metallic. The Aspire S7 is extremely small and compact, it is only 0.5 inches thick and only weighs in at 2.9 pounds. The 13.3-inch Aspire S7 features a 2560 x 1440 WQHD display and supports Intel’s latest Haswell processors. Being so compact do you only have a limited number of ports and the battery is smaller. You will probably only get around 5 hours of battery life out of the Aspire S7.

The Aspire S7 starts at a low $899, but the model we would recommend is $1499.

Apple Macbook Air

We had to include the Macbook Air on our list. Colin has one and he really loves it. Unlike the other Ultrabooks listed here the Macbook Air is not an Ultrabook, but one of the most popular ultra-portables out there and it does not run Windows, but rather Apple’s OS X operating system. Many people enjoy that operating system and it is less susceptible to viruses. As the name suggest the Macbook Air is extremely small and light, which makes it extremely easy to take with you anywhere. The keyboard and trackpad are some of the best available. Just like all the other Ultrabooks the Macbook Air is available with Intel’s latest Haswell processors. The 13-inch Macbook Air has a native resolution of 1440 x 900, which is lacking compared to other laptops that we have mentioned. The battery life on the Macbook Air is very impressive, depending on what you are doing you can get 10 to 12 hours of use out of it!

The 13-inch Macbook Air starts at $1099 and goes up from there.



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Windows Phone 8.1 Review

Windows Phone 8.1 Review | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

I was an early fan of Windows Phone 7. I remember completely switching over to the platform for about a month back in 2010, and being relatively happy. It wasn’t until I needed tethering support (which didn’t exist in the first release of WP7) that I had to move away. Unfortunately, Microsoft’s software and hardware update cadence for Windows Phone couldn’t pull me back.

In its first three years of existence, Windows Phone received roughly the same number of major updates as Android and iOS. From 2010 - 2013, Google took Android from Gingerbread to KitKat, Apple revved iOS from version 4 to 7, and Microsoft gave us Windows Phone 7, 7.5 and 8.0. At best, you can consider the software release cadence competitive. At worst, it’s not enough. Windows Phone started behind both Android and iOS. To come out ahead, Windows Phone updates had to be more substantive, more frequent or both.

The same could be said about hardware. Microsoft lagged behind Apple and Google to dual-core, 28/32nm silicon, higher resolution displays, and LTE support among other things. Although the situation has improved over the past year, if the goal is to take the #1 or #2 spot, the upgrade cadence needs to be more aggressive.

It always felt like the point of Windows Phone was to be a midpoint between the flexibility of Android and iOS’ guarantee of a certain level of user experience. The platform was born during a time when Android was not yet ready for the mainstream (Gingerbread) as an iOS alternative, and when it still looked like the Windows licensing model would work for handset OEMs.

Today the world is a different place. Android is far more mature than it was in 2010, and it’s polished enough where it can easily be a solution for the enthusiast as well as the first time smartphone user. While Microsoft’s strategy in 2010 might have been one of eyeing the crown, in 2014 the strategy is more humble and focused.

Improve the platform, address issues both little and big, and continue to grow. That’s the mantra these days and today we see it put in action with the arrival of Windows Phone 8.1, the fourth major release of the platform since its arrival in 2010.

Read on for our review of Windows Phone 8.1

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Keeping medical device designs relevant in a big data world migrating to outcomes-driven payment models

Keeping medical device designs relevant in a big data world migrating to outcomes-driven payment models | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Last week I presented the closing keynote at the Medical Design & Manufacturing (MD&M) West Conference & Exhibition in Los Angeles. MD&M has always been about what’s next in medical device design and this year’s event didn’t disappoint. While still being primarily focused on hardware, many smart device manufacturers came out to MD&M looking for advice on next generation architecture and thinking so that they could point their product roadmaps in the right direction. The questions at the end of keynote were astute and thought provoking. Below is what I shared with the crowd in both the main presentation and through answers to their questions; you can find my presentation deck at SpeakerDeck.com as usual.

Today we’re accustomed to going on the Internet to visit websites, send e-mails, shop online, run mobile apps, and even get up to the second and down to the inches directions from satellites orbiting the earth. We’re seeing medical devices and related hardware moving faster towards the same kinds of consumerization, their sensors switching from analog to digital native, becoming more mobile, and perhaps most importantly, becoming part of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) by generating enormous amounts of coveted clinical data.

What’s going to be even more spectacular is that you’ll soon be wearing smart watches that can know your vital signs, electronic “bandaids” that can sense whether wounds are healing, and many other personal medical devices that continuously monitor things going on within and around your body. These kinds of devices will make up what will soon become the “Medical Internet of Things” (mIOT). mIOT devices will generate significant amounts of data and managing this data becomes what’s known as a “big data” problem. The reason is obvious – data flowing continuously from your body comes in rapid velocity, large volumes, and many different kinds of variety.

IoT, Big Data, mIOT, and analytics will certainly transform the medical device landscape and those that don’t adapt won’t be around to enjoy the spoils. The way next generation devices will be designed must adapt so that new devices generate the right kinds of data that are easier to analyze and utilize – the specific traits that buyers of clinically useful equipment will use when making purchasing decisions. New health system purchase decisions will be made era of value-driven decision-making due as the fee for service (FFS) payment models get augmented by outcomes based payments in so-called Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). As our customers of medical devices get paid less for the services they perform and more for the patient outcomes they improve, their expectations of data generated from our devices also gets more sophisticated.

As we create and upgrade future devices, our designers must realize that they’re no longer just making standalone devices, they’re likely crafting a system component that fits into a larger system of systems ecosystem that is creating and moving around enormous amounts of coveted data. Coveted because that data can be used to improve diagnostics, tailor clinical workflows, improve patient safety, and advance care coordination. All of these kinds of tasks and the data that will make them possible become even more important as payment models move from FFS to outcomes-driven.

If you’re a company making an analog device living in a digital world, your days are numbered and you need to be worried. If you’re making digital devices and you’re not sharing data with IT systems, your competitors will be selling more products than you will because ACOs and outcomes-driven organizations have an insatiable appetite for data. Because next generation health systems will be paid for outcomes, they will not settle for aging, expensive, stand alone equipment when connected alternatives are available. If you’re selling digital devices that are sharing some data but not capturing enough data to make it useful for analytical purposes, you’ll see limited revenue growth and margin pressure along with loss of sales as your customers phase out your products in favor of those that generate clinically valuable data for improving their workflows.

Most medical devices, like other IOT devices, will be disrupted by the business-value focused Big Data movement at some level. How much your company’s products are disrupted will depend on whether your devices are built around the idea of enabling agile clinical workflows and whether your devices generate patient outcomes improvements in a measurable way. Think about the mobile phone and digital devices world in 2007 vs. 2014 – almost none of the same players that were big back in 2007 are still big today. Now, think about the world in 2021. Will your company be around or will it be disrupted out of existence by Big Data, analytics, and new payment models?



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Google envisions Glass in businesses

Google envisions Glass in businesses | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Google wants to put its Glass headmounted computer system to work.

The company is looking to partner with enterprise software developers and businesses as part of a push to get Glass into the hands of companies who could use it in their operations.

[ Also on InfoWorld: 7 hidden dangers of wearable computers. | Understand how to both manage and benefit from the consumerization of IT with InfoWorld's "Consumerization Digital Spotlight" PDF special report. | Subscribe to InfoWorld's Consumerization of IT newsletter today. ]

Through its "Explorer" program, Glass is already used by thousands of software developers and early adopters who are tinkering with the product and creating applications for consumers. Now, Google wants to replicate that initiative for business applications.

Google calls the effort the "Glass at Work Explorer Program," and companies and software developers interested in participating can apply online. "If you're a developer who is creating software for U.S. based enterprises, we'd love your help in building the future of Glass at Work," Google said.

Since its unveiling, Glass has generated questions over what it's supposed to be used for, including what advantages it could offer over a mobile smartphone. Some businesses like bars have banned it so their patrons don't feel uncomfortable around those wearing Glass, which has a voice-activated camera.

Others are already using Glass in ways that seem productive. Wearable Intelligence, for instance, is working to customize Glass' default Android software for health professionals and energy workers. In one scenario, a paramedic in an ambulance could use Glass to access a patient's vital signs and medical history, as depicted in a YouTube video posted by the company.

Schlumberger, an oilfield services company, has also partnered with Wearable Intelligence to use Glass to increase the safety and efficiency of employees in the field, Google said. The Washington Capitals professional hockey team, meanwhile, has partnered with the software company APX Labs to deliver real-time stats, instant replay and different camera angles to fans via Glass.

There is a lot of hype around wearable devices like Glass, but over the next 10 years more businesses could employ the technology in concrete, useful ways, according to a recent report from Forrester Research.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach's e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com


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Life as a Healthcare CIO: Wearable Computing at BIDMC

Life as a Healthcare CIO: Wearable Computing at BIDMC | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

I’m now able to publicly write about the work that Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has been doing with stealthy start up, Wearable Intelligence. We’ve been working over the past 4 months on pilots that I believe will improve the  safety, quality  and efficiency of patient care through the integration of wearable technology such as Google Glass in the hospital environment. I believe that wearable tech enables providers  to deliver better clinical care by supporting them with contextually-relevant data and decision support wisdom.

 One of our Emergency Department physicians, Dr. Steve Horng, said it best:

 "Over the past 3 months, I have been using Google Glass clinically while working in the Emergency Department. This user experience has been fundamentally different than our previous experiences with Tablets and Smartphones. As a wearable device that is always on and ready, it has remarkably streamlined clinical workflows that involve information gathering.

For example, I was paged emergently to one of our resuscitation bays to take care of a patient who was having a massive brain bleed. One of the management priorities for brain bleeds is to quickly control blood pressure to slow down progression of the bleed. All he could tell us was that he had severe allergic reactions to blood pressure medications, but couldn’t remember their names, but that it was all in the computer.

Unfortunately, this scenario is not unusual. Patients in extremis are often unable to provide information as they normally would.  We must often assess and mitigate life threats before having fully reviewed a patient’s previous history. Google Glass enabled me to view this patient’s allergy information and current medication regimen without having to excuse myself to login to a computer, or even loose eye contact. It turned out that he was also on blood thinners that needed to be emergently reversed. By having this information readily available at the bedside, we were able to quickly start both antihypertensive therapy and reversal medications for his blood thinners, treatments that if delayed could lead to permanent disability and even death. I believe the ability to access and confirm clinical information at the bedside is one of the strongest features of Google Glass.”

As procedure oriented specialists, emergency medicine clinicians must stay visually engaged with their patients while also using their hands to complete critical tasks.  Wearing a device that enables clinicians to view different forms of information without having to disrupt workflow to access a computing device is  empowering.

 This video demonstrates the value and impact that the technology can have.

 Here’s how we are currently using it:

When a clinician walks into an emergency department troom, he or she looks at bar code (a QR or Quick Response code) placed on the wall. Wearable Intelligence’s software running on Google Glass immediately recognizes the room and then the ED Dashboard sends information about the patient in that room to the glasses, appearing in the clinician’s field of vision. The clinician can speak with the patient, examine the patient, and perform procedures while seeing problems, vital signs, lab results and other data.

Beyond the technical challenges of bringing wearable computers to BIDMC, we had other concerns—protecting security, evaluating patient reaction, and ensuring clinician usability.

We have fully integrated with the ED Dashboard using a custom application to ensure secure communication and the same privacy safeguards as our existing web interface.  All data stays within the BIDMC firewall.

Wearable Intelligence has designed a custom user interface to take advantage of the Glass’ unique features such as gestures (single tap, double tap, 1 and 2 finger swipes, etc.), scrolling by looking up/down, camera to use QR codes, and voice commands. Information displays also needed to be simplified and re-organized.

We implemented real-time voice dictation of pages to staff members to facilitate communication among clinicians.

 After several months of testing, we have deployed the product to clinical providers in the ED and are completing the first IRB approved study (to our knowledge) of the technology’s impact on clinical medicine.

Working on novel technology with Wearable Intelligence provides respite from an agenda that has been filled with meaningful use, ICD-10, ACA, and the HIPAA Omnibus rule.   I look forward to reporting further about our experience.

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Is Your Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Compliance Program Going Out the Window with XP? | The National Law Review

Is Your Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Compliance Program Going Out the Window with XP? | The National Law Review | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it
April 8, 2014 marks the end of Microsoft’s support for the Windows XP operating system, which means the end of security updates from Microsoft and the beginning of new vulnerability to hackers and other intruders into systems still utilizing the operating system. But does the end of Windows XP support mean that HIPAA covered entities and their business associates using Windows XP are automatically out of compliance with HIPAA as of April 8th? Not necessarily.
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Encore Presentation: WEDI's 10 Recommendations for Next-Generation HIE

Encore Presentation: WEDI's 10 Recommendations for Next-Generation HIE | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it
Twenty years after the Workgroup for Electronic Data Interchange issued the WEDI Report that ushered in the HIPAA standards to automate health care administrative and financial transactions, the group in December 2013 released a roadmap to guide the next generation of health information exchange.


Patient Engagement: Standardize the patient identification process across the health care system.

Convene industry to identify best practices for patient matching, launch consumer awareness and education campaigns, initiate pilots and explore dissemination strategies, and launch an adoption campaign


Patient Engagement: Expand health IT education and literacy programs for consumers to encourage greater use of health IT to improve care management and wellness.

Identify curriculum and deployment strategies for standardized materials, pilot the materials, and launch educational and literacy programs.


Patient Engagement: Identify and promote effective electronic approaches to patient information capture, maintenance and secure appropriate access that leverages mobile devices and “smart” technologies.

Convene business and clinical experts to define the standard technology, data content and dissemination strategy. Identify mobile technologies and apps that easily provide users information in a timely manner. Pilot best practices and effectiveness.


Innovative Encounter Models: Identify use cases, conventions and standards for promoting consumer health and exchange of telehealth information in a mobile environment.

Map electronic encounters (telemedicine, email, text & care monitoring) by typical use, then develop a matrix showing how innovative encounters are typically used. Evaluate and prioritize the effectiveness of technology initiatives.


Innovative Encounter Models: Adopt and implement best-in-class approaches promoting growth and diffusion of innovative encounters that demonstrate value for all stakeholders.

Evaluate encounter models in terms of patient support & satisfaction, outcomes, ease of integration into workflow and liability issues. Assess and prioritize existing protocols and payment methodologies for electronic encounters. Survey consumer willingness to use and pay for electronic encounters.


Innovative Encounter Models: Identify federal and state laws that create barriers to innovative encounters, including licensure.

Continue monitoring for potential regulatory barriers and best practices. Create policy mechanisms and partnerships to get supporting legislation.


Data Harmonization & Exchange: Identify consistent & efficient methods for electronic reporting of quality and health status measures across all stakeholders, with initial focus on recipients of quality measure information.

Review existing methods and standards for electronic clinical quality measurement, develop a plan to get consensus on methods & standards, design and launch awareness campaigns, pilot standards and develop a plan to get industry adoption.


Data Harmonization & Exchange: Identify/promote methods & standards for HIE that enhance care coordination.

Review existing methods, standards and implementation guides to identify gaps that impede connectivity and timely sharing. Develop a plan for industry consensus on methods and standards, test them, and develop a plan for adoption.


Data Harmonization & Exchange: Identify methods & standards for harmonizing clinical and administrative information reporting that reduce data collection burdens, support clinical improvement and population health, and accommodate new payment models.

Review existing methods, standards and implementation guides to identify impediments to linking clinical and administrative data. Develop consensus on methods & standards supporting claims attachments and quality reporting in Stage 3, then pilot.


Payment Models: Develop a framework for assessing core elements of alternative models such as connectivity, eligibility/enrollment reconciliation, payment reconciliation, quality reporting and coordinated data exchange.

Assess technology needs to facilitate implementation of alternative models and educate stakeholders. Assess the technology market for existing solutions to aid implementing and adopting alternative models.

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What is the future of computerized physician order entry? | EHRintelligence.com

What is the future of computerized physician order entry? | EHRintelligence.com | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Earlier this year members of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) pointed to the abundance of published research demonstrating the positive influence of the EHR Incentive Programs and their meaningful use requirements on care quality, safety, and efficiency. One significant takeaway from this literature review was strong evidence supporting the favorable effects of computerized physician order entry (CPOE) on patient outcomes.


With CPOE a cornerstone of the EHR Incentive Programs and its role increasing in future stages of meaningful use, how is CPOE adoption going to evolve over time? That was one of the questions posted to Methodist Health System’s SVP and CMIO/Chief Quality Officer Sam Bagchi, MD, during a sitdown interview at Wolters Kluwer booth at HIMSS14 in Orlando.
In this second and final installment of a two-part CPOE Q&A, Bagchi describes what lies ahead for his health system as it moves forward with CPOE and looks to increase adoption and improve the functionality of this health IT tool. As he explains, getting physicians to adopt CPOE is a necessary first step, but it is only the beginning of an ongoing process of optimization.
What’s next for CPOE at Methodist Health System?

We’re seeing a lot of organizations, ourselves included, running into high-adoption CPOE projects because of various deadlines that are out there and initiatives that are related to this. As we look back, we see people sometimes unhappy with how the system works or how their content is organized.
Our key in the first phase is getting physicians into the system, comfortable with the content, and generally standardizing evidence-based elements. The key to the optimization phase is comparing similar content and refining our content so that we only have one heart failure order set and four heart failure order sets at hospitals, so that it’s easier to find what you need and that we can count on getting the right care to the right patient at the right time every time.
What kind of input are you getting from physicians and how do you turn feedback both positive and negative into CPOE improvements?

We take every complaint as a request for improvement. We take input from all the physicians. We set up email addresses and we have frontline staff out at the hospitals soliciting feedback. We use our training sessions as feedback sessions so we’re not just telling you how it is today is how it has to be but we want to know what you want to improve. We take that feedback to an integrated informatics IT change management meeting that happens once a week that didn’t exist last year and now exists so that we can organize our changes, be aware of our changes, and rapidly improve our current system.
How does this approach to soliciting feedback and rolling out enhancements also work to benefit the organization’s health IT systems and services?

It also helps us deploy innovations or new elements of the enterprise EMR that we want to use and not wait two to three months to do it. We’re doing 50-60 changes a month based now on this process, and if you don’t listen and move quickly after you go live on a project like CPOE, your physicians that you have engaged so heavily to get there can sometimes get off the bus. So we’re trying to keep everybody on the bus.
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Clinical Mobile Apps Lead To Speedy Data Turnaround

Clinical Mobile Apps Lead To Speedy Data Turnaround | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it
Magazine Article | January 28, 2014
Clinical Mobile Apps Lead To Speedy Data Turnaround
To access this content, please Register or Sign In.

By Katie Wike, contributing writer

At Rockdale Medical Center, clinical mobile apps are accelerating the transmission of data among departments, meeting HIPAA requirements and pleasing physicians.

In 2012, Epocrates Research group found 34 percent of physicians used a tablet computer and 75 percent planned to buy one within a year. Eighty-one percent of those who owned a tablet owned an iPad. Tablets continue to gain popularity due to their unmatched mobility and ease of use. Despite the trend, connecting these mobile devices to existing EHR platforms in a way that meets HIPAA security requirements may prove to be a tricky task.

For Rockdale Medical Center (RMC) in Rockdale County, GA, the answer was a clinical mobile app already approved by the FDA as a diagnostic aid. Since 1954 RMC has made its mission to provide the best care possible for all the patients in the 138-bed acute care facility. The need for a means of transmitting patient data from the emergency department to the lab and at night with a smaller staff available spurred RMC’s search for a HIPAA-compliant datasharing technology.


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How to Perform a Clean Install of Windows 8.1 With a Windows 8 Key

How to Perform a Clean Install of Windows 8.1 With a Windows 8 Key | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Windows 8.1 is a free upgrade to all Windows 8 users, but you normally can’t install Windows 8.1 with a Windows 8 product key. Luckily, you can get around this limitation if you really want a fresh install of Windows 8.1.

Microsoft also only allows you to download Windows 8.1 installation media with a Windows 8 key, so we’ll show you another trick that allows you to download Windows 8.1 installation media with a valid Windows 8 key.

The Problem, and How We’ll Fix It

The problem is that Windows 8.1 product keys are different from Windows 8 product keys. You can’t enter a Windows 8 product key into the Windows 8.1 installer, just as you can’t enter a Windows 7 product key into the Windows 8 installer. You also can’t install the original version of Windows 8 with a Windows 8.1 product key.

This normally makes sense, but Windows 8.1 isn’t really a different version of Windows. It’s a free upgrade to every single Windows 8 user, so there’s absolutely no reason to introduce a new product key system.

Microsoft wants you to install Windows 8 normally and use the Windows 8.1 upgrade offer in the Windows Store to get Windows 8.1. Only people who purchase Windows 8.1 can install it fresh, not people who origianlly purchased Windows 8.

That’s the theory, anyway. In reality, there’s a way we can get around this limitation. The Windows 8.1 installer refuses to accept the Windows 8 product key and won’t allow us to install Windows 8.1 with it. However, Windows 8.1 will accept the Windows 8 product key if you enter it on the desktop after installing Windows 8.1 — no, we don’t know why it works this way. If we had a way of skipping the product key prompt during the installation process and entering the key later, we could install Windows 8.1 fresh — luckily, we do have a way of doing that. We’ll just need to modify the Windows 8.1 installation media a bit.

Download Windows 8.1 With a Windows 8 Product Key

The second problem is that Microsoft only allows you to download Windows 8.1 installation media with a Windows 8.1 product key. You can’t normally download it with a Windows 8 product key. Luckily, there’s yet another confusing trick we can use to get around Microsoft’s limitations.

First, visit the Upgrade Windows with only a product key page. Click the install Windows 8 button to begin downloading Windows 8 installation media. Run the downloaded tool and enter your product key. After the download begins, close the setup tool.

Next, visit the Upgrade Windows with only a product key page. Click the Install Windows 8.1 button and run the downloaded tool. The Windows 8.1 setup tool won’t prompt you for a key, but will download Windows 8.1 normally. Select the Install by creating media option after it completes and create either USB installation media or an ISO file. We’ll assume you’re creating USB installation media for this process, as it’s the easiest way to do this.

Modify the Windows 8.1 Installation Media

If you try to install Windows 8.1 with the media you created and your Windows 8 product key, you’ll see an error message. Instead, we’ll need to modify the installation media before beginning in the installation process.

This is easiest if you’ve created USB installation media, as you can edit the files directly on your USB flash drive. If you created an ISO file, you’ll have to modify the files inside it before burning it to disc.

Open the USB drive in Windows Explorer or File Explorer and navigate to the sources folder inside it. Right-click inside the sources folder, create a new text file, and name it ei.cfg . (Ensure it’s named ei.cfg , and not ei.cfg.txt — this may require ensuring file extensions are shown.)

Open the ei.cfg file in Notepad or another text editor. Copy-paste the following text into the text file and then save it.

[EditionID]
Core
[Channel]
Retail
[VL]
0

If you have a product key for the Professional version of Windows, replace the word Core with Professional.

Install Windows 8.1 Normally and Enter Your Product Key Afterwards

You can now install Windows 8.1 normally using the installation media you created. You won’t be prompted for a product key while installing it. After the installation process completes, you’ll see a product key prompt. You can enter your Windows 8 product key here, and Windows 8.1 will accept it for some reason.

You now have a fully working Windows 8.1 system fresh-installed with only a Windows 8 product key. The installation media you created can be used to install Windows 8.1 on other systems with a Windows 8 product key, so you can more quickly install Windows 8.1 on multiple computers.

Yes, it’s ridiculous that we even have to write an article about this. Windows 8.1 is practically a service pack for Windows 8, and it’s free to all Windows 8 users — Windows 8.1 even accepts Windows 8 keys when installed, but it doesn’t during the installation process. There’s no reason to force Windows users — especially loyal ones who purchased Windows 8 at release thanks to Microsoft’s $40 offer — to jump through so many hoops.

Thanks to Paul Thurrot for demonstrating how to download Windows 8.1 installation media with a Windows 8 key, and thanks to nate.wages on Neowin for sharing how to install Windows 8.1 with that key!



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The Programmer – Healthcare Divide | EMR and HIPAA

The Programmer – Healthcare Divide | EMR and HIPAA | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

’ve regularly seen the divide (sometimes really wide) between the programmer and technical people in an organization and the healthcare professionals. For example, a healthcare IT company recently emailed me about an issue they had with their main developer. They asked the insightful question, “Is it possible to find quality developers who are not, shall we say, “difficult”?”

There’s no simple answer to this question, but let me first suggest that this divide isn’t something that just happens between tech people and non-tech people. I’m sure many doctors feel the same way when dealing with other people who try and do their job. It turns out, people are hard to work with in general.

That disclaimer aside, tech people do like to think they’re in a tribe of their own. Check out this video which definitely comes from a programmer perspective and illustrates the divide that often exists.

Just the fact that the programmer feels like they’re considered a “code monkey” describes a major part of the issue. Much like I wrote about today on EMR and EHR, one of the keys is making a human connection as opposed to treating a programmer like a code monkey that’s just there to do your bidding. While there are exceptions, most people respond to someone who deeply cares about the individual and works to understand their needs as much as the project’s needs or their own needs.

The reason I think there’s usually a big divide between the healthcare people and the tech people is that it’s a real challenge for these two groups to connect. The healthcare people don’t want to talk about Battlestar Gallactica and Game of Thrones and the tech people don’t want to talk about Dancing with the Stars and The Voice. Yet, this is what needs to happen to build trust between the two different groups. It’s a rare breed that enjoys both.

If all of this fails, then try the nuclear option. Bring donuts. Most people can relate to donuts.



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Readers Write: Can Intuitive Software Design Support Better Health? | HIStalk

Readers Write: Can Intuitive Software Design Support Better Health? | HIStalk | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Can Intuitive Software Design Support Better Health?
By Scott Frederick

Biometric technology is the new “in” thing in healthcare, allowing patients to monitor certain health characteristics—blood pressure, weight, activity level, sleep pattern, blood sugar—outside of the healthcare setting. When this information is communicated with providers, it can help with population health management and long-term chronic disease care. For instance, when patients monitor their blood pressure using a biometric device and upload that information to their physician’s office, the physician can monitor the patient’s health remotely and tweak the care plan without having to physically see the patient.

For biometric technology to be effective, patients must use it consistently in order to capture a realistic picture of the health characteristics they are monitoring. Without regular use, it is hard to see if a reading is an anomaly or part of a larger pattern. The primary way to ensure consistent use is to design user-friendly biometric tools because it is human nature to avoid things that are too complicated, and individuals won’t hesitate to stop using a biometric device if it is onerous or complex.

Let’s look at an example.

An emerging growth area for healthcare biometrics is wireless activity trackers—like FitBit—that can promote healthier lifestyles and spur weight loss. About three months ago, I started using one of these devices to see if monitoring metrics like the number of steps I walked, calories I consumed and hours I slept would make a difference in my health.

The tool is easy-to-use and convenient. I can monitor my personal metrics any time, anywhere, allowing me to make real-time adjustments to what I eat, when I exercise, and so on. For instance, at any given time, I can tell how many steps I’ve taken and how many more I need to take to meet my daily fitness goal. This shows me whether I need to hit the gym on the way home from work or whether my walk at lunch was sufficient. I can even make slight changes to my routine, choosing to stand up during conference calls or take the stairs instead of the elevator.

I download my data to a website, which provides easy-to-read and customizable dashboards, so I can track overall progress. I find I check that website more frequently than I look at Facebook or Twitter.

Now, imagine if the tool was bulky, slow, cumbersome and hard to navigate. Or the dashboard where I view my data was difficult to understand. I would have stopped using it awhile ago—or may not have started using it in the first place.

Like other hot technology, there are several wireless activity trackers infiltrating the market, each one promising to be the best. In reality, only the most well-designed applications will stand the test of time. These will be completely user-centric, designed to easily and intuitively meet user needs.

For example, a well-designed tracker will facilitate customization so users can monitor only the information they want and change settings on the fly. Such a tool will have multiple data entry points, so a user can upload his or her personal data any time and from anywhere. People will also be able to track their progress over time using clear, easy-to-understand dashboards.

Going forward, successful trackers may also need to keep providers’ needs in mind. While physicians have hesitated to embrace wireless activity monitors—encouraging patients to use the technology but not leveraging the data to help with care decisions—that perspective may be changing. It will be interesting to see whether physicians start looking at this technology in the future as a way to monitor their patients’ health choices. Ease of obtaining the data and having it interface with existing technology will drive provider use and acceptance.

While biometric tools are becoming more common in healthcare and stand to play a major role in population health management in the future, not every tool will be created equal. Those designed with the patient and provider in mind will rise to the top and improve the overall health of their users.

Scott Frederick, RN, BSN, MSHI is director of clinical insight for PointClear Solutions of Atlanta, GA.



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Just say yes? The rise of 'study drugs' in college

Just say yes? The rise of 'study drugs' in college | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

(CNN) -- Around this time of year, you're more likely to find college students in the library cramming for final exams than out partying. In an environment where the workload is endless and there's always more to be done, a quick fix to help buckle down and power through becomes very tempting.

Prescription ADHD medications like Adderall, Ritalin, and Vyvanse are becoming increasingly popular for overworked and overscheduled college students -- who haven't been diagnosed with ADHD.

Experts reevaluate ADHD drug study

"Our biggest concern ... is the increase we have observed in this behavior over the past decade," says Sean McCabe, research associate professor at the University of Michigan Substance Abuse Research Center.

FDA warns of fake Adderall sold online

Full-time college students were twice as likely to have used Adderall non-medically as their counterparts who were not full-time students, according to a National Survey on Drug Use and Health report released in 2009.

The numbers vary significantly by school, with the greatest proportion of users at private and "elite" universities. Some researchers estimate about 30% of students use stimulants non-medically.

More students think marijuana is OK

"When we look at upperclassmen, the number really begins to jump," says Alan DeSantis, professor of communications at the University of Kentucky who has conducted research on stimulant use in college. "The more time you stay on campus, the more likely you are to use."

Of course, by and large the most common use is to concentrate while studying, with more than 90% of users doing it for this purpose.

ADHD stimulants "strengthen the brain's brakes, its inhibitory capacities, so it can control its power more effectively," said Dr. Edward Hallowell, a psychiatrist and ADHD expert. "They do this by increasing the amount of certain neurotransmitters, like dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine."

Students say they take these stimulants for the "right reasons," to be more productive in classes and to stay afloat in the sea of intense competition.

In a 2008 study of 1,800 college students, 81% of students interviewed (DeSantis 2008) thought illicit use of ADHD medication was "not dangerous at all" or "slightly dangerous." While the picture of a methamphetamine user has hollowed cheeks, rotting teeth, and skin sores, an amphetamine-dextroamphetamine (Adderall) user looks just like anybody else.

"It helps me stay focused and be more efficient, which is very helpful with the chaos of college," says one university student who takes Adderall anywhere from once a month to a few times a week, depending on her schedule and workload. Students did not want to be identified because of their illegal use of the prescription drugs.

Yet these drugs are Schedule II substances, sitting pretty on the Drug Enforcement Administration's list right next to cocaine, meth and morphine.

"College students tend to underestimate the potential harms associated with the nonmedical use of prescription stimulants," McCabe says.

Students may not know the stimulant's documented contraindications (situations in which a drug might be harmful) or recommended precautions or how it may interact with other drugs, McCabe says. Hallowell is also concerned that students taking controlled substances without prescriptions and physician supervision, noting that they may not know the dosage.

How will I handle this course load?

WATCH: ADHD meds don't work long-term

Short-term adverse consequences include sleep difficulties, restlessness, headaches, irritability and depressed feelings. Other side effects include loss of appetite, nervousness, and changes in sex drive.

The long term risk of psychological and physical dependence is of concern for routine users that may find they do not feel they can function optimally without it. Schedule II substances are classified by the DEA as having a high potential for abuse.

While students' knowledge of the health dangers are limited, even less consideration is given to the illegality of use. Obtaining stimulants from friends with prescriptions, as the vast majority of college students do, seems less dangerous and illegal than buying drugs off the street.

"The fact that it's illegal really doesn't cross my mind," one student says. "It's not something that I get nervous about because it's so widespread and simple."

The biggest barrier to changing attitudes is the effectiveness of stimulants on campuses where the ends justify the means, researchers believe. After those late library nights, many students praise the little pill that got them through their hefty textbooks and into the morning.

After taking Adderall, says one university student, "I just feel very alive and awake and ready for challenges that come my way."

"I'm on page 15 (of my paper) in just a few hours ... and I'm very confident in it."



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Microsoft concedes Chromebooks are work-worthy

Microsoft concedes Chromebooks are work-worthy | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Microsoft on Monday conceded that Google's Chrome OS and the Chromebooks the operating system powers are capable of doing real work, a reversal of its "Scroogled" campaign that once blasted the laptops as worthless.

Almost as an afterthought, Microsoft yesterday announced it was bringing its free Office Online apps -- Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote -- to rival Google's Chrome Web store, the primary distribution channel for Chrome OS software.

[ InfoWorld dishes on must-have iPad office apps, essential Android productivity apps, and road warrior standbys. Start downloading! | Get the latest insight on the tech news that matters from InfoWorld's Tech Watch blog. ]

Microsoft released Word and PowerPoint to the store Monday, and said it will launch Excel Online shortly. It published OneNote on the store last Friday, April 11.

The move was largely symbolic: The Office Online apps have long been able to run within virtually any browser, including Chrome, the foundation of Chrome OS.

But by packaging the apps in .crx format and submitting them to the automated review run by Google, and thus publishing them to the Chrome Web Store, Microsoft put its Office Online in front of Chrome and Chrome OS users and in a place they've been trained to look for Web apps.

It was also a repudiation of Scroogled, the name Microsoft slapped on its attack ad-based campaigns that took shots at Google and its practices. Last November, Microsoft targeted Chromebooks in an advertisement starring reality show "Pawn Stars" personalities who argued that the devices were not legitimate laptops.

"It's not a real laptop," the pawn shop owner said in the ad of a Chromebook a seller hoped to hock. "It doesn't have Windows or Office."

While Chromebooks do not run Windows, they do Office, or at least Office Online, the free browser-based apps that provide an increasing amount of functionality.

Microsoft's move was also reminiscent of several that Google has made, including releasing a "Metro" version of Chrome for Windows 8, 8.1 and 8.1 Update that dramatically changed the standard Microsoft user interface (UI). Google's strategy has been described by some analysts as subversive, one that tries to assimilate devices running other operating systems into the search giant's web of services.

Office is one of Microsoft's most potent weapons in its struggle to morph into a company dedicated to selling devices and services, and become the firm known for its "mobile first, cloud first" battle cry. So, with little leverage on Chrome OS owners and a customer who's running Chrome lost to IE, it's no surprise that Office is Microsoft's strongest play here.

- See more at: http://podcasts.infoworld.com/d/computer-hardware/microsoft-concedes-chromebooks-are-work-worthy-240503?source=rss_computer_hardware#sthash.MnQKhp9Z.dpuf
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Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Like many other doctors across the country, , a Dallas orthopedic surgeon, recently made the switch from paper to electronic medical records. This meant he no longer had to just take notes when he was examining a patient — he also had to put those notes into the computer as a permanent record.

"I was really focused on just trying to get the information in, and not really focusing on the patient anymore," Ramnath says.

In fact, he found he was spending an extra two to three hours every clinic just on electronic records. So he hired medical scribe Connie Gaylan. Acting a bit like a court reporter, Gaylan shadows Ramnath at every appointment. As the doctor examines a patient, Gaylan sits quietly in the corner, typing notes and speaking into a handheld microphone. Once she's finished with the records, she gives them to Ramnath to check and approve, saving him hours of administrative work and allowing him to concentrate on his patients.

"I would more than happily sacrifice a significant chunk of my income for the improved quality of life I have," Ramnath says.

Medical scribes are in high demand nationally. Any doctor who doesn't make the switch from paper to electronic records by 2015 will face Medicare , and this deadline is fueling the demand.

As the doctor examines a patient, medical scribe Connie Gayton records the visit using a microhone tethered to her laptop.

Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

, the country's first scribe staffing company, is on the second expansion of its Fort Worth, Texas, headquarters and has opened another office in Chicago. , the company's CEO, says the firm is growing by 46 to 50 percent every year. In 2008, PhysAssist had 35 scribes; now it has 1,400. The other big scribing companies — and — each have thousands more, and the demand keeps growing.

PhysAssist trains scribes from across the country every week in its Fort Worth mock emergency department, where instructor Brandon Torres shows students the right way to fill out an electronic medical record. There are thousands of record systems, and scribes need to know how to put in the right billing codes and medical terminology at lightning speed. Torres says it's important not just to be able to multitask, but also to be able to listen to multiple things at the same time.

"You're listening to the physician, you're listening to the nurse, you're listening to the patient," Torres says. "And you're gathering all that information and presenting it back to the physician."

That last part's crucial. The physician has to approve the scribe's notes, because ultimately the doctor is responsible for the record.

Medical scribes make $8 to $16 an hour. Many of them are medical students who say they find it an invaluable experience. But it's not clear that scribes make things better for patients.

with in Washington, D.C., points to one done in an emergency department in New Jersey that found that doctors with scribes were able to see more patients on average — which means more money for the institution. But that same study found that the amount of time a patient spent in the emergency department didn't decrease. Medical scribing also raises some privacy concerns, O'Malley says. Some patients may not like having an extra person in the exam room.



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Thank XP: Desktop PC sales take off again in Western Europe

Thank XP: Desktop PC sales take off again in Western Europe | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

PC sales in Western Europe have risen after 13 consecutive quarters of decline, according to market research company Gartner. The market research company said government spending and the replacement of machines running Windows XP contributed to the growth.

Across the whole of Europe, the Middle East and Africa, PC sales grew by 0.3 percent after eight quarters of decline.

[ Windows 8 left you blue? Then check out Windows Red, InfoWorld's plan to fix Microsoft's contested OS. | Want a new PC? InfoWorld picks the 12 best Window 7 PC models available today. | Cut to the key news for technology development and IT management with the InfoWorld Daily newsletter, our summary of the top tech happenings. ]

PC shipments in the region totaled 22.9 million units during the first quarter, compared to 22.8 million in the first quarter of 2013. The impending end of support for Windows XP boosted commercial sales, while delayed government buying in large western European countries also helped, according to Gartner.

"Funnily enough the growth was driven by desktops. The main reason is that a lot of enterprises and smaller and mid-sized companies in Europe are lagging behind with the migration from Windows XP," said Meike Escherich, principal analyst at Gartner.

Manufacturers and resellers won't be able to live off the migration from Windows XP in the long term, but in a PC market that has been struggling for two years as a result of the growing interest in smartphones and tablets, it will provide a welcome boost for a few of quarters to come, according to Escherich.

The economic situation in Europe is also improving, and business and governments are adjusting their spending to match. However, not all segments looked as good as commercial sales of desktops. The notebook market was stagnant, and sales to consumers were sluggish, Escherich said.

Hewlett-Packard held on to the largest share of the market: Its shipments grew by 15.3 percent year-on-year. Lenovo cemented its number-two spot as sales increased by 35.6 percent. The company has now had seven consecutive quarters of strong growth, Gartner said. Acer retained the third place even though its sales dropped by 2.7 percent.

"Companies who specialize in the business segment like HP and Fujitsu, for example, did much better than the pure consumer vendors like Acer," Escherich said.

Worldwide PC shipments fell by 1.7 percent to 76.6 million units. Lenovo, HP and Dell were the three largest vendors, Gartner said.

Send news tips and comments to mikael_ricknas@idg.com


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Life as a Healthcare CIO: The March HIT Standards Committee

Life as a Healthcare CIO: The March HIT Standards Committee | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

The March HIT Standards Committee focused on the Standards and Interoperability (S&I) Framework projects for 2014, an overview of the 2015 Certification Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, and a first review of the standards maturity for the proposed Meaningful Use Stage 3 criteria.

Doug Fridsma presented the S&I update.  Importantly, a new initiative has been launched to coordinate decision support and clinical quality measures as related activities. EHRs should provide alerts and reminders from pathways, protocols, and guidelines intended to improve quality.  Also, a new initiative will connect EHRs and the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) to improve workflow, hopefully supporting single sign on and patient context passing so that PDMP data is one click away from any EHR.

Steve Posnack reviewed the 2015 Certification Notice of Proposed Rule Making, highlighting the changes from 2014.  He noted that the concept of the Complete EHR is no longer needed.   Providers buy the certified technology they need to attest and it may be that modules, an EHR, and an HIE meet all the attestation needs, not a single monolithic product.  The Implementation Workgroup will review the impact of the 50 new proposals in detail and we will discuss them at the April meeting.

I presented a task force review of the 19 Meaningful Use Stage 3 proposals.

Below are a few comments from the task force and the Standards Committee members.   Although the bulk of our comments focused on standards maturity, we also commented on provider impact and development difficulty, hoping to offer helpful “in the field” feedback to the Policy Committee.

Clinical decision support - it would be very challenging for an EHR to track every response to every decision support intervention and no standards exist for such tracking.  Maybe the best way to encourage decision support is via payment reform which links outcomes to pay.

Order tracking - there are standards for closed loop lab ordering but not closed loop referral workflow.   The Harvard Risk Management Foundation recently funded a project to define all the steps in closed loop referral management, pictured below.   Given the lack of standards and the development burden of this workflow, a focus on lab seems most appropriate.


Demographics/patient information - although standards exist for occupation and industry, other new demographic standards such as gender identify and sexual orientation are a work in process.  Here’s a great reference describing one approach. There could be a significant impact on EHR development if new demographics selections affect patient education materials, decision support, and quality measures.

Advance directive - a pointer to an advanced directive such as a URL would require little development and the standards are mature.

Electronic notes - Although the standards to transmit free text within a clinical summary are mature, the “high threshold” (likely over 50% of patients to have notes) could be a high burden first step.

Hospital labs - The HL7 2.51 standards are mature but a minority of hospital reference labs support comprehensive LOINC codes.

Unique device identifiers - The standard is well described but the implementation difficulty could be high if the electronic record had to validate the UDI against a national database and enable reporting on UDIs in the case of recalls.

View, download, transmit - the standards for clinical summaries are mature except for the representation of structured family history.  The requirement to make data available to patients within 24 hours could present workflow challenges.

Patient generated health data - certifying multiple methods of data capture creates a burden on developers.  Maybe a less prescriptive approach, focusing on the ability to receive patient data in some fashion would be best.

Secure messaging - overly prescriptive workflows could force the retooling of existing high functioning products.    Maybe a less prescriptive approach, focusing on the ability to support effective patient communication would be best.

Visit Summary/clinical summary - the nature of the clinical summary text (structured, unstructured, timeliness) could have workflow and development implications.

Patient education - the requirement is for only one language other than English and the Infobutton standard can support this.   A single language other than English may not achieve the policy outcome desired.

Notifications - although the HL7 admit/discharge/transfer standards are mature, the notion of gathering the Direct addresses of care team members and sending event data via Direct is a novel workflow.

Medication Reconciliation - identical to stage 2, no concerns

Immunization history - The HL7 2.51 content and CVX vocabulary standards are mature.  The transport specification created by the CDC (SOAP) is well tested.   The questions we raised - is there a role for Direct in transmitting immunization data to registries since Direct is used for other transmissions in Meaningful Use?   Is REST an alternative to all Meaningful Use “push” and “pull” transactions.   The public health community is passionate about the use of SOAP.   There are pros and cons to using something different for public health transport than other areas of Meaningful Use, so it is likely there will be further discussion.

Registries - the development effort required to submit provider chosen data elements to  registries would be significant.   Standards do not exist for this purpose.

Electronic lab reporting - identical to stage 2, no concerns

Syndromic surveillance - identical to stage 2, no concerns

There will be more discussion in upcoming meetings as both FACAs recommend iterative improvements as input before rule making.

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Security Risk Analysis | Providers & Professionals | HealthIT.gov

Security Risk Analysis | Providers & Professionals | HealthIT.gov | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

A security risk assessment is required under the HIPAA Security Rule. Learn about planning, conducting and reviewing the risks and vulnerabilities in your healthcare organization, and how regular risk assessments can protect your practice and your patient data

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The critical, widespread Heartbleed bug and you: How to keep your private info safe | PCWorld

The critical, widespread Heartbleed bug and you: How to keep your private info safe | PCWorld | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

No matter how hard you try to stay safe, some aspects of securing your online data are completely out of your hands. That fact was made painfully obvious on Monday, when the Internet got caught with its collective pants down thanks to a critical vulnerability affecting a fundamental tool for secure online communications.


Called Heartbleed, the bug has been in the wild for more than two years now. It allows attackers to exploit a critical programming flaw in OpenSSL—an open source implementation of the SSL/TLS encryption protocol.

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From AHIMA: Look Closer at Vendor HIPAA Compliance

From AHIMA: Look Closer at Vendor HIPAA Compliance | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

With stronger HIPAA privacy and security requirements now in effect, health care providers need to ensure that their information technology vendors and their business associates understand and are compliant with the provisions.

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Some Linksys routers targeted by TheMoon malware

Some Linksys routers targeted by TheMoon malware | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Security researchers have discovered a flaw in the firmware of some Linksys routers that could allow a hacker to gain control remotely, possibly turning a group of infected routers into a botnet.


The vulnerability has been exploited by malware dubbed TheMoon, according to a story at Computerworld, and the SANS Institute’s Internet Storm Center reports it has spotted Linksys E1000 and E1200 routers that were scanning the Net for other routers to infect.


Linksys routers have the ability to be managed remotely via a Web page or a smartphone app. The flaw involves a one or more scripts used in this process. Once the malware is installed, it tells the router to begin looking for others to infect in the same way. The malware also appears to contain code that may have it looking for a command and control server that would tell it what to do.


A PC World story lists these Linksys models as being potentially vulnerable, based on details posted to Reddit by a user who created a proof-of-concept exploit:


The following models are listed: E4200, E3200, E3000, E2500, E2100L, E2000, E1550, E1500, E1200, E1000, E900, E300, WAG320N, WAP300N, WAP610N, WES610N, WET610N, WRT610N, WRT600N, WRT400N, WRT320N, WRT160N and WRT150N. However, Rew notes that the list might not be accurate or complete.


A spokesperson for Belkin – which now owns Linksys – confirmed the exploit to PC World, and said it can be prevented but making sure Remote Management Access is turned off. She said the routers ship with that feature disabled by default.


Linksys has posted information about how to update its routers to the latest firmware and make sure that Remote Management Access is turned off. If you’ve got a Linksys router, you should read it and take action ASAP.



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