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News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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6 Outstanding Applications of AI in Today's Care Ecosystem

6 Outstanding Applications of AI in Today's Care Ecosystem | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Behold the Magic of Intelligent Care Healthcare with Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence (AI) – the smart, cognitive devices of today’s era – has penetrated extensively across all possible verticals – from financial services to manufacturing – and healthcare is no exception. With interest in AI booming exponentially, its scope of application in care-based applications has widened beyond imagination.

 

Reports indicate that the AI-driven healthcare market will see a tremendous growth of almost 40% by the end of this decade. From delivering advanced care-related information to physicians to make informed decisions to personalized real-time treatment, advanced applications of AI in healthcare are indeed revolutionizing care.

 

Let’s check out some of the outstanding applications of AI in today’s care ecosystem.

1. Diagnosis

One of the most advanced applications of AI in healthcare is in disease diagnosis. With AI, machines are supercharged with the ability to analyze voluminous data from medical images, prompting early diagnosis of many disorders. AI provides an easy solution through intelligent diagnostic imaging. This approach has multiple applications in proactive diagnosis of the possibility of stroke, tumor growth, and certain types of cancer, giving the physician the chance to derive a comprehensive treatment plans for patients well ahead of time.

2. Biomarkers

Biomarkers automatically provide accurate visual and audio data of patients’ vital health parameters that indicate the presence of specific medical conditions, help choose the ideal medications, or assess treatment sensitivity. Biomarkers accurately capture symptoms, as against the guesswork of symptoms perceived by patients. The accuracy and speed of biomarkers have made them the preferred tools of diagnosis, promptly highlighting possibilities of any disorders.

3. Virtual nursing assistance

AI -based applications and chat bots support care providers in delivering nursing assistance after discharge from hospital. This feature helps simplify provision of outpatient services and increases the accuracy of monitoring patient compliance post discharge. Available even as simple wearable’s and on smart phones, these AI-enabled devices also act as virtual health assistants that remind patients about their medications, encourage them to follow their exercise routines, answer simple medical clarifications sought by patients, and warn care providers about any untoward incidents such as sudden increase in blood pressure or a fall.

4. Remote monitoring of patients

This involves round-the-clock remote monitoring of patients, constant evaluation of their vital signs, and real-time alerts to caretakers and care providers. This remote assessment of vital health parameters helps physicians identify core symptoms of diseases and disorders in patients and respond accordingly. This approach clearly prevents unnecessary visits to the physician to a great extent.

5. AI and drug discovery

AI-driven computing can accurately and promptly study structures of multiple drug molecules and predict their pharmacological activity, potency, and adverse effects. This possibility opens up a rapid and cost-efficient route of drug discovery. It also has the chance of drastically reducing the cost of medications. Used across pharmaceutical companies, AI-based drug discovery has contributed to supporting the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

6. AI-enabled hospital care

AI simplifies care delivery in hospitals through a wide range of solutions including smart monitoring of IV solutions, patient medication tracking, patient alert systems, nursing staff performance assessment systems, and patient movement tracking within hospitals. Robot-assisted surgeries and AI applications in routine phlebotomy procedures are other potentially useful applications. AI has been found to considerably decrease dosage errors and increase nursing staff productivity in hospitals.

 

Conclusion – the era of AI has arrived in style
With voluminous investments pouring in for AI applications in healthcare, this technology still has a long way to go, despite its presence in healthcare for quite many years now. The main reasons for its slow adoption are the cost of research, the security concerns involved in opening up extensive databases, and misconceptions or errors in coming to quick conclusions. But the quest for ideal AI solutions looks quite promising indeed, with AI supplementing healthcare and improving the quality of care from diagnosis to prognosis.
So, where are you in your journey towards an AI-driven care ecosystem?

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Medical billing for dummies

Medical billing for dummies | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Here are some frequently asked questions about medical billing and their answers that will serve as your first lesson on the field of medical billing.

What is medical billing?

Medical billing is the process of submitting and following up on health insurance claims with the insurance company. This process is undertaken by a medical billing specialist with the support of the insurance desk team of the hospital or healthcare provider.

 

It is the responsibility of the medical biller to ensure that the service provided to the patient (who is insured with the insurance company) receives reimbursement. As part of this process, the medical biller sends an invoice detailing the treatment and the health services provided to the health insurance company on behalf of the healthcare provider. Therefore, when done efficiently, medical billing can optimise revenue performance for the healthcare provider. Today, most medical billers make use of specialised software which help in automating and improving the speed and efficiency of the process.

How is medical billing different from medical coding?

Both medical coding and medical billing are processes that are largely responsible for the smooth progress of the healthcare provider’s revenue cycle. Medical coding, carried out by a medical coder, is the process of assigning specific codes to the different health services rendered to the patient.

 

Medical billing, carried out by a medical biller, utilises the diagnosis and procedure codes derived from the medical record documentation to assemble all data concerning the medical bill or claim accurately and efficiently. Therefore, medical billing is a process that is dependent on medical coding.

What are the steps involved in medical billing?

The basic steps involved in medical billing are:

  1. Charge Entry
    • The medical biller, in this step, enters the charges for services provided to the patient. The charge entry also includes the appropriate linking of medical codes to services and procedures rendered during the patient’s visit.
  2. Claims Transmission
    • Once the claim has been properly completed, it must be submitted to the insurance company for payment. This step is called claims transmission or claims submission and is done electronically in formats specifically required by the insurance companies. Sometimes, clearing houses are used to reformat the claims in the format that matches the need of the insurance company.
  3. Monitoring of Adjudication
    • Once a claim is submitted to the insurance company, it undergoes a process called claims adjudication wherein the insurance company evaluates the claim and decides whether or not the claim is eligible for reimbursement based on factors including validity and compliance.
    • At the end of the adjudication, the insurance company sends a report to the healthcare provider. It is the medical biller’s responsibility to review this report and ensure that all procedures listed on the claim are accounted for. If there are any discrepancies, the biller will enter into an appeal process with the insurance company.
  4. Payment Posting
    • This step marks the end of the billing cycle and involves posting and deposit functions. Payment or settlement is received from the insurance company at this point, and the payment records of every patient are recorded in the billing management software.
  5. Patient follow-up
    • Medical billers follow up with patients whose bills are delinquent, rejected or partially paid to make sure that the payment due for the healthcare service, which has not been settled by the health insurance company, is received. This may involve contacting the patient directly, sending follow-up bills, or, enlisting a collection agency.

 

In conclusion, it can be said that the medical biller is the bridge between the healthcare provider and the health insurance company. Additionally, the medical biller may also be involved in supporting the insurance desk, communicating with the physician for clarifications and many such tasks that are related to the claims process.

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Medical Software On The Cloud

Medical Software On The Cloud | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

As more and more traditional companies leverage the benefits of the cloud, it’s no real surprise that the healthcare industry has embraced technology, with electronic health records now commonplace. We have provided a cloud-based solution for clinical and practice management software since 2012 and the adoption rate among Australian healthcare practices and clinics grows each year.

 

Cloud for Health allows users of popular clinical software packages (such as Medical Director and Best Practice) to access data from anywhere by simply using their web browsers on any internet-ready device. It allows users to concentrate on core activities without worry about servers, backup maintenance or essential security updates as we take care of all that under our service level agreement(SLA).

 

Other advantages include guaranteed data storage on Australian servers (also a legal requirement) and immediate access to an ideal solution for rural GPs that often need to travel long distances between clinics, allowing the easy use of mobile clinics, taking the practice on tour, so to speak.

 

Doctors located in the middle of the desert can access their clinic records remotely, simply by using a laptop and phone, tethering the laptop to a 3G or 4G connection if available. Alternatively, you can simply use a smartphone , netbook or other portable device with a browser. In times past, you would have needed to log in directly to your practice, with low speed often the result. Not so with the cloud, as maximum performance is always available.

 

As the whole process is browser-based, it’s no longer necessary to have a high-performance laptop for productive tasks. Even older laptops will work perfectly as long as an internet connection is available.

 

Not all healthcare professionals require mobility but cloud hosting has other advantages:

 

  • You no longer need a server and can eliminate associated hardware costs and maintenance issues.
  • Data backups are automated using redundant hard drives, preventing unexpected data loss
  • 24/7 maintenance and support is offered by reputable service providers
  • Software patches and security updates are handled by the service provider


Our aim as a service provide is to remove IT as a consideration for healthcare professionals and let them focus on patient care. Even in extreme situations where all hardware in the practice has failed (due to power loss, fire or water damage, for example) vital clinical data can still be accessed using a mobile phone. The benefit to business continuity is obvious.

 

The majority of clinical software is designed for use with Microsoft Windows, with Mac users often experiencing problems. However, by use of a Citrix Desktop Viewer, the platform does not matter as everything is viewed in a standard browser, regardless of whether the user is on Windows, Android, iOS or MacOS.

 

Coming from a family of doctors, I originally considered offering a free service to make the lives of healthcare professionals easier by allowing them to focus on patient care. However, I decided to implement a licence fee structure, given the variety of experts, hardware and hosting requirements necessary to provide a reliable service. It is true that ‘you get what you pay for’ and a free service would have compromised features and defeated my original goals.

 

The licence fee structure works well and is cost-effective, regardless of the size of the practice, given the backup protection and risk managements solutions that are immediately solved. In addition, we perform a full IT and business process audit to maximise the investment, ensuring that all systems are configured correctly.

 

While some are still reluctant to move to the cloud, due to perceive security issues, I believe these concerns to be ill-founded, especially when you consider that cloud service providers are held to a higher standard than traditional networks. We are subject to regular third party audits that we cannot avoid if we are to retain our IT and industry certification status. By achieving these standards, we publicly confirm that we exercise due diligence in security, data storage and internal disaster recover processes.

 

Therefore, we can offer a complete IT solution with confidence, whether it’s on the cloud, onsite or a combination of both. Eliminate your IT concerns and focus on your business. Contact us for further details.

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Why Firms Of All Sizes Need To Outsource? 

Why Firms Of All Sizes Need To Outsource?  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

I was working as a product development engineer at AcroMed (a spinal implants manufacturer that was acquired by DePuy in 1998), when I noticed a gap in the medical device industry. There were plenty of companies coming up with great ideas for devices, but there were holes in the product development cycle thanks to a lack of resources or expertise.

 

That’s when I decided to grab a shovel and start filling some of those holes. First came Empirical Testing Corp. (ETC), which focused on testing devices. It was all we did, so we got good at it over the course of 20 years. Through ETC, we heard from clients who needed small-batch manufacturing and prototyping, so we launched Empirical Machine. Clients came to us for regulatory support through both of those specialty companies, so we added Empirical Consulting to our group of companies. Each branch of our corporate family tree developed as an answer for companies or individual developers lacking a critical in-house resource.

 

For companies large and small, outsourcing specific aspects of device development builds forward momentum and supports the entire industry.

 

Andy Fauth is an engineer by training. For 13 years, he’s worked in a private-equity, privately owned business he says owes its growth to finding the right vendors. He’s now chief technology officer for SMV Scientific, a company that specializes in the bone-implant interface and designs, develops, and manufactures orthopedic devices. The company began as a two-person research and development venture four years ago and has grown into a 17-person business with three devices on the market and six 510(k)s completed.

 

“As an emerging company, we don’t have the capital to have the equipment internally or hire everybody we’d like to hire for the right way to handle this stuff,” he said. “The only way we could incubate this company and grow was to outsource.”

 

Even for larger companies, it often makes sense to outsource specific parts of device development, he said.

 

“There’s always a bottle neck somewhere—that’s why there is an outsource market,” Fauth said. “Some of that stuff is specialty. When you’re going to do it once every couple of years, you don’t want to do that internally. There’s always specialty equipment, whether it’s a test frame or test fixture or experience with a certain protocol you don’t have in-house, or don’t want to invest in having that in-house long-term. You just need to use it once and check the box.”

 

Raymond Cloutier, vice president, Engineering & Development, Advanced Technologies at Exactech, said despite significant resources and commitment to Exactech’s in-house resources, he also turns to outside vendors for specialized support. Sometimes it’s an issue of capacity, but he also appreciates the benefits of outside expertise.

 

“[Outside vendors] are in a somewhat privileged position,” he said. “They’re also doing work for other companies, which helps them know the benchmark or industry standard. Sometimes when we’re in our own world as a company, we don’t have as much understanding of how requirements should be interpreted. An outside consultant may better understand what expectations, for example, the FDA may have. Suppliers generally have seen how multiple companies prepare submissions.”

 

He said bigger companies may, at times, err on the side of being overly cautious.

 

“Oftentimes large companies take very conservative positions because they have a lot at stake,” Cloutier said. “The question is, are they being ‘overly compliant’? Are they doing things more rigidly than what the external regulatory bodies require? Sometimes an outside perspective helps you better know the answer to that.”

 

David Poirier is founder and owner of spinal implant company Presidio Surgical, which has a staff of eight. He keeps quality control, marketing, sales, distribution, and accounting in-house, but the bulk of his device development work depends on outside vendors.

 

“Everything we do, we pay for through sales and distribution of our products,” Poirier said. “They have to be right. There’s really no room for error. We’ve made errors. They hurt.”

 

At first glance, it may appear outsourcing is more expensive than keeping things under your roof. But those numbers can be misleading. You may pay $200 per hour to a single vendor—which is often more than an employee’s hourly wage—but you’re not paying benefits or down time when the employee is not actively engaged on the project, Poirier said. There’s also a matter of prioritizing in-house expertise to make the best use of time and money, he said.

 

“If I take someone in quality engineering and say, ‘I need you to work on this gauge design,’ my project may have a mid-level priority, but I’ve taken them from a much higher-level project; there’s an opportunity cost,” Poirier said. “There’s the cost of the benefits and true cost of employees, then the opportunity cost. It’s a general management issue you have to think about. With consultants, you’re only paying them for what they deliver instead of the full cost (of an employee).”

 

Paying for support a la carte is less expensive than developing that service for your business, Poirier said.

 

“I only pay them for the work they do,” he said. “When you’re outsourcing, it can be a benefit if you have really good experts. You’re paying them for what you want and get what you need. You’re paying for specific service rather than a staff member. It’s hard to find good people.”

 

Working with consultants who are well-known in the industry has its advantages, Fauth said.

 

“Just to get the expertise for third-party validity for our customers, we’d outsource,” he said. “We actually had to challenge and re-invent new standards. We worked with the FDA to develop protocols and standards that didn’t exist at the time. When you have an outsource company that’s done all of that already and has a reputation of being a good firm, it lends a lot of credibility and merit to what you’re trying to do.”

 

Word-of-mouth referrals and networking are solid first steps toward finding the partner.

 

“Reputable is the key,” Cloutier said. “One test that gives me an indication is how careful they are at protecting other companies’ knowledge. If they share confidential information from other companies with you, then they’re probably sharing your confidential information with others. Observing this helps me judge who is a trustworthy supplier to work with and who isn’t.”

 

And even as you consider outsource options for aspects of your project, never forget the big picture, Fauth said.

 

“I look at anybody we interact with as a potential partnership, not just a customer/supplier relationship,” he said. “If something goes bump in the night, I want everyone equally committed to fixing it.
I also want it to be a win for both parties. That’s the right way to do business long-term. It’s not always about price or lead time. Those are factors. It’s also about quality, it’s about trust, it’s about faith they’re going to make it right if something goes wrong and everybody’s going to work for everybody else’s best interest.”

 

Dawn Lissy is a biomedical engineer, entrepreneur, and innovator. Since 1998, the Empirical family of companies (Empirical Testing Corp., Empirical Consulting LLC, and Empirical Machine LLC) has operated under Lissy’s direction. Empirical offers the full range of regulatory and quality systems consulting, testing, small batch and prototype manufacturing, and validations services to bring a medical device to market. Empirical is very active within standards development organization ASTM International and has one of the widest scopes of test methods of any accredited independent lab in the United States. Because Lissy was a member of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Entrepreneur-in-Residence program, she has first-hand, in-depth knowledge of the regulatory landscape. Lissy holds an inventor patent for the Stackable Cage System for corpectomy and vertebrectomy. Her M.S. in biomedical engineering is from The University of Akron, Ohio.

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Doctors Software for Clinic Management  

Doctors Software for Clinic Management   | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Clinic business is extra complicated than ever, with Doctors Software for Clinic Management, you get easy solutions for each part of your routine work, from scheduling appointments to billing. We take care of your business by providing the perfect solution so you take care of your patients more efficiently. Doctors Software for Clinic Management was designed with the help of a medical doctor and clinic staff to make it a fit choice for your working environment. Our Doctor’s module is easy to use. Connection with Labs, Pharmacies and more, make your work easy and quick and it works the way you work.

 

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is an efficient and automatic way of dealing with health facility with options like Doctor’s appointments, administrative activities, patient’s treatment history, diagnostics information, and billing, etc. Doctor’s software for clinic management is good for a hospital with single/multiple locations. It was developed keeping in mind the small and medium-size polyclinics too, and the focus was especially on portability and ease of use. Doctors Software for Clinic Management covers most of the standard features often found in software made for clinics or hospitals.

 

Ease of use, manageability, multi-user functionality, the fast information retrieving in Doctors Software for Clinic Management are exemplary as compared to other such programs. Deciding to use Doctors Software program based on the cloud platform is very cost effective for the clinics. Doctors Sofware for Clinic Management is a good choice for the small as well as huge hospitals or clinic setup. It requires no much expenditure on equipment, hardware or trained IT staff. Those are the resources that a health facility, assisting an in-house IT setup to have to utilize, which are costly. This optimized Doctors Software for Clinic Management is updated, configured and maintained within the cloud through the skilled IT professionals. The users are, hence, free from the burden. It results in price saving and the staff pays attention to the main functions of the Clinic.

 

Easy to use, and Efficient

Doctors Software for Clinic Management gives rapid, simple and easy solutions for the Hospitals or Clinics to manage daily tasks. It allows for streamlining report generation, inventory management, patient management, employee’s attendance and other tasks. Doctors Software for Clinic Management smoothly integrates with your workflow. This cloud-based software program easily distinguishes scheduling for different physicians and a simple interface that consists of tabs for speedy switching across different features and functions. With these features, an easy to use patient portal, detailed reporting, and customizable workflow, Doctors Software for Clinic Management covers the various aspects of clinic management and administration.

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is very easy to use, and effective software program to control the management process of clinic or hospital. This Software Program is one of the best for individual Doctor Clinic or a hospital. In case you are looking for easy to apply and easy to keep software in your clinic or small health center, this software program is best for you. At a very affordable price, you not only get the software but also free training and support from our company.

A Product of EVision Techno Services

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is a Module of EVision’s Hospital Management System.

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Avoid Clinical Data Loss

Avoid Clinical Data Loss | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Have you checked your clinical data backups in the last four weeks? Do you have a signed document from your IT vendor agreeing to your patient confidentiality policy? Finally, as a business owner or manager, do you know what security policies and technologies are in place to protect your patients’ data?

 

If you’ve answered no to any of those questions, then you’re not alone and unfortunately, your business might be at risk.

 

43 percent of the health businesses audited by REND Tech Associates in 2013 believed they implemented adequate security measures in their businesses. However, our audit results told a different story.

 

One of the costliest technology risks to a healthy business is the failure to recover current patient data easily and promptly. The inability to do so can have severe medico-legal implications for health businesses and their patients. Such risk is always linked to the backup policy that businesses chose to implement.

 

To minimize the risk of not being able to recover your patients’ data when you need it most, I suggest contracting an eHealth engineer to design and tailor a backup plan unique to your business and available technology.

 

The second major source of data loss risk is the unauthorized access to clinical patient data by IT vendors. Whilst we can agree that not all IT vendors actively choose to access clinical patient data, there have been cases reported where practices and health businesses have faced legal actions due to their inability to provide signed confidentiality agreements from their IT vendors and staff.

 

If you don’t have a signed document from your eHealth engineer stating that they meet your patient data access policy then you need to obtain one now.

 

If you’d like a confidentiality agreement template then please feel free to call us and we’ll be able to send you a generic template.

 

The third security risk to health businesses is the unauthorized access of patient data, which we all commonly know as hacking. However, most health business owners or managers aren’t aware that half the hacking cases reported aren’t external hacks but internal ones.

 

An internal hack is when an unauthorized staff member or stakeholder within the business is able to access clinical or business data that they are not supposed to.

 

To remove the internal hack risk from your business you can implement a few simple steps. The first step is to ask the clinical staff not to share their passwords with other staff members. The second tip is to ensure that no one except the business owner, manager and IT vendor can access the server. The third tip is to audit your business IT platform every 12 months. It is important to have an external eHealth engineer audit your current IT platform and check the level of service that your IT provider is delivering.

 

Ongoing regular audits ensure that your business is protected from downtime due to technology failure, medico-legal complications due to unauthorized data access and most importantly, ensuring that you can always use your backups when needed.

 

If you enjoyed this article and would like more useful tips, then I’d encourage you to visit our website for more useful articles, tips, and recommendations.

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Tips to Make Your Clinic More Efficient

Tips to Make Your Clinic More Efficient | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Business process engineering or business workflow optimization are terms used to describe how an organization and its staff are able to achieve more by changing or improving the way they do things.

 

By ’achieving more‘ we mean either getting the same results from a previous process but by doing less or delivering better results by doing things in a new way.

 

Ultimately business process engineering makes the clinic more efficient AND more productive. We surveyed some of our existing customers (specifically for this blog) to find out areas that they had improved on in their business. The key areas were:

  • Reducing administration work
  • Simplifying the patient journey
  • Reducing staff error
  • Reducing the workload on management and the team in general
  • Promoting a better culture at work by making it less stressful

 

Now for the fun part, below are the top five workflow changes our clients implemented (by using technology) that made them and their staff more productive:

 

Systemise the business via an online portal: We touched on this last week and it’s no surprise that systemizing the business in a way that makes it easy for the staff to follow the processes helps both business efficiency and staff productivity. Our clients (specifically those in the management layer) have found more time to focus on more important tasks by directing the staff to visit the online portals for answers they may require in terms of completing a business task. Systemising all business processes and delivering them in an interactive method will certainly reduce the number of times you will hear “How do I do this?” and the number of times you will think “Why can’t they just do it?”.

 

Technology on the go (Cloud Computing): Are you one of those doctors/practice managers who travel or work from different locations? You see your patient, write your notes then drive (or fly) back to the office to enter the notes into your clinical system? Cloud computing allows doctors to access their clinical software from anywhere. This simply permits you to enter the patient data while you are still with the patient which in turn, cuts down your administration work dramatically.

 

Social media at work: Sure, some managers will say “No Way” to have a chat program at work but the reality is that all high-efficiency organizations are implementing work-specific chat programs to allow their staff to communicate quicker. Whilst Skype is an option, there are many other programs that permit staff to chat and share information with each other easily.

 

Let the website reduce inbound inquiries: This isn’t something new or revolutionary but we still work with businesses on changing their website from a business card to a new staff member. Here’s the tip, write a list of the 10 most common inbound inquiries your staff receive and then put the answers to those inquiries on the contact us page on your website. You’ll notice that the inbound calls you receive are now more relevant and direct. If you could use short videos to answer those questions then you have just saved yourself and your staff a lot of time, freeing them up to complete more important work.

 

Online timesheets: You’re probably thinking, huh? What do you mean by online timesheets? Well, those who work on a contract basis are generally required to submit a timesheet. It’s generally printing out a spreadsheet, filling in the hours, signing the form and popping it into the manager's pigeonhole. We believe it’s easier to complete the time sheet and submit it online. It saves the payroll staff and management a lot of time and processing work. General practice clinics (same as all health businesses) have adopted this technology to reduce user error, payroll issues and most importantly, reduce the time it takes to remind staff to complete their timesheets.

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How to Prepare Your IT Department for Telemedicine 

How to Prepare Your IT Department for Telemedicine  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

You've read all about the benefits telemedicine can offer not just to your patients, but also to your practitioners and your clinic as a whole. You've done your research and have decided to take the leap, bringing telemedicine technology and services into your clinic - congratulations!

 

While this is an exciting time for you and your clinicians, it's important that you work closely with the other side of your telemedicine operations - your IT department - to ensure as smooth a transition and adoption process as possible. Here are a few things to make sure you cover with your IT department before you go live with your telemedicine solutions.

Get your infrastructure ready

One of the great things about modern telemedicine technology is the flexibility it allows - aside from the software and hardware, all a clinic needs is an Internet connection. Well, almost. It's essential to ensure that your Internet speed is capable of handling the rigors that may be placed on it by telemedicine technology such as videoconferencing. According to the American Telemedicine Association, any operation that offers one- or two-way videoconferencing should have a broadband connection capable of supporting speeds of 500 kbps both downlink and uplink. With many modern telemedicine encounter management software products used today, the amount of bandwidth taken can be adjusted or allocated between video and data sources accordingly.

The ATA recommends using the most reliable means available of connecting to the Internet. So for many applications such as a clinic, this means your IT department should hardwire your telemedicine equipment directly to your modem rather than relying on a WiFi connection and a router. Satellite and WiFi connection are used frequently for telemedicine applications, but users can experience noticeable differences in the communication speed, image quality and intermittence of signals.

Have a hardware plan in advance

Do you know if your telemedicine equipment will be arriving preassembled, or will you need to construct it upon receiving it? If the latter, are you and your IT department comfortable with doing so reliably and safely?

It seems like a minor point, but if you're a first-time adopter of telemedicine, try and find equipment solutions that are fairly low-maintenance in terms of requirements on your end. This means either shopping for equipment that is available out of the box as a telemedicine system, or trying to find an end-to-end solution provider that can take care of all your requirements. Trying to source multiple pieces of equipment from multiple vendors can make getting support or maintenance a nightmare. Try and find a "one-stop shop" to make the process as simple as possible.

Interoperability with existing software or hardware

Interoperability is a term used widely these days, and everyone claims it. The truth is, it would be impossible to deliver interoperability that would satisfy everyone's needs, but the best case scenario at this point in time is to use telemedicine products and technologies that can be easily integrated with your existing workflow and follow standards-based guidelines for transferring or transmitting data - such as HL7 integration.

Don't forget privacy

One of the sticking points that telemedicine has faced in recent years is that of privacy in accordance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It's a requirement that any Internet connections used to discuss sensitive patient information should have encryption using secure socket layer (SSL) and system-user identifiers such as logins and passwords.

Similarly, any cloud-based servers used to store patient data should be encrypted as well to prevent cybersecurity risks.

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Technological Updates For Every Hospital 

Technological Updates For Every Hospital  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Every health care facility has a need to maintain optimal technological efficiency. In a high-pressure environment, every second counts and organization is integral for overall efficiency. To ensure that your hospital stays updated instead of being left behind by constantly modernizing technologies, integrate these five updates for keeping the hospital functioning and efficient.

1. Virtualization

Storing applications and documents in physical servers is an unnecessary risk today when virtual storage is so ubiquitous for optimal security. By storing everything necessary to keep the hospital running smoothly, including applications, programs and records, in the cloud rather than on a hard drive, you not only provide better security for the hospital, but also free up space on hard drives to ensure that systems can run as smoothly and quickly as possible.

2. Core Content Management

Rather than storing electronic health records on outdated special purpose systems, connect all health records to a core content management center. SharePoint and Alfresco are excellent options for managing documents and content from a central system. This allows hospitals to maintain optimal organization and record-keeping reliability.

3. System Synchronization

To ensure that data is organized in a unified way, use context management strategies to synchronize systems so that separate programs and applications can come together at the user-interface level. This modern standard is referred to as Clinical Context Object Workgroup (CCOW), and essentially means that a user only has to edit or identify a subject once in order for the change to be implemented by all apps in that system. This is often combined with Single Sign-On (SSO) integration, which allows for a single user to sign on to all applications in a given system simultaneously with a single user name and password. The benefit of synchronizing systems and apps with CCOW and SSO is that information can be exchanged fluidly between various apps, decreasing chance of human error when it comes to confusing data neglecting to update records.

4. Location-Based Tracking

With modern tracking capabilities, it makes sense to expect equipment to be able to track itself in order to increase security. Location-based awareness means that logins can be allowed or disallowed based on location and equipment can be programmed to respond to certain locations by enabling or disabling specific features. These capabilities maximize security and broaden the potential for hospitals to customize systems.

5. HTML5 and JavaScript

As the final version of HTML was released in October 2014, web and mobile applications should be updated to HTML5 from the old HTML 4. HTML5 allows for greater integrations and enhanced functionality compared to HTML4, which will soon be phased out. Hospitals can supplement the benefits of HTML5 with JavaScript, which allows for animation and interactivity. With these updates, hospitals can remain up to date with the latest breakthrough in technology language, including the greater flexibility with the ability to work offline.

 

Phasing out outdated technology to make room for modern, updated systems and applications makes a world of difference in the overall functionality of any environment. When security, efficiency and organization are priorities, these five updates can help ensure that hospitals get the most out of their technology.

 
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7 Must-Have Features For Your Medical Clinic Website

7 Must-Have Features For Your Medical Clinic Website | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

In 2016, we are all plagued with an overabundance of information. For most of us, we want to find out only specifically what we need to know, and ignore the rest.

This is especially true for patients who are searching for a doctor online. According to the Pew Research Center, 80% of Internet users look for health information online, including 44% who search for physicians or health professionals.

 

When a patient visits your medical clinic website, they really want three things:

 

-To find out the important details they need to visit
-To feel in control of their experience
-To get a sense of who you are, and see if they trust you

With this in mind, here are 7 essentials you need to have an engaging, attractive medical website:

 

1. Patient Forms 



Make it easy for patients to schedule appointments, register and access important forms before they arrive at your office. Placing the registration form under a “New Patient” tab will make it easy to find.

 

2. News and Updates

Refreshing your site with recent news and updates will help build an online presence and allow patients to feel comfortable that their doctor is up to date on current issues. It will also help your practice rank higher in search engines, making it easier to find.

 

3. Contact Information

Prominently display contact information on every page, preferably in the top right corner, or at the bottom of the screen in the footer. Ensure also that you have entered your details onto Google Maps so that your clinic is showing up in location searches.

 

4. Patient Resources 



Providing patients with valuable content on popular health topics and link to trusted resources to give your patients the most up-to-date facts available. If there is a recent topic that is concerning people, you can also provide some general tips on these. This will help you build trust with your patients and show you as an up-to-date expert.

 

5. Services, Insurances, Payment Options

Most visitors will be interested what services you provide or insurances you accept. Making this information easy to find by having tabs at the top of the screen listing ‘Services’ and ‘Insurance’. You can also note whether there are special financial arrangements available, and whether you take cash.

 

6. Mobile Friendly Interface

According to an article by Search Engine Land, more searches now occur on mobile devices than any other platform. For this reason, your website should be viewable on all mobile browsers. Most website templates these days offer a mobile view, so this is not usually an issue, but is very important that your website is easy to navigate on a cellphone as it is on a computer screen.

 

7. Social media links and plugins. 



In a recent article by Forbes it was shown that Facebook now drives more online traffic than google searches. By having clearly displayed links to web site to your clinic’s Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn and YouTube channel if you have any or all of these.

 

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A Wireless Doctor In Your Pocket 

A Wireless Doctor In Your Pocket  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

A combination of disposable wireless sensors and smartphones is about to make health care more personal, immediate, and affordable. New solutions are emerging that harvest real-time health data and respond with on-the-spot warnings or suggestions. This technology will not only produce better outcomes, it will help extend the benefits of modern health care to people in developing countries and keep consumers everywhere better informed about the latest health products and practices.

The disposable wireless sensors being developed and commercialized by Gentag, Inc. are a good example. The sensors are intended for use by consumers and come packaged as either skin patches or specimen dipsticks. Gentag believes there is a huge global market for sensors that can be mass-produced, are easy to use, and work with popular smartphones and tablet computers.

Unlike telemedicine, which was conceived to conquer distance, Gentag’s technology is mainly about immediacy. Consumers can use skin patches and dipsticks at their convenience in their homes and workplaces. Smartphone apps provide instant feedback and can automatically forward results to caregivers. Problems can be spotted in their earliest, most treatable stages and therapy can begin at once.

Disposable sensors offer significant savings over traditional solutions. Most of the sensor designs lend themselves to high-volume mass production. They work with smartphones that consumers already have or are expected to have in the near future. And disposable wireless sensors avoid the costs associated with traveling to and using outpatient labs.

Gentag’s skin patch sensors typically consist of printable chemical strips and near field communications (NFC) chips. The chemical strips can test and measure parameters such as body temperature, skin moisture, and (with the aid of microneedles) blood glucose. NFC makes collecting the results as simple as a waving a mobile phone over the skin patch. (NFC sensors don’t require batteries because the phone provides the power.) Using NFC to read a sensor also helps avoid human error. Dipstick sensors can test specimens such as urine for pregnancy, prostate cancer, and other conditions.

The disposable wireless sensor-smartphone combination can be used to manage serious medical conditions. A smartphone app for managing diabetes can collect blood glucose readings from a skin patch containing microneedles and send commands to an implanted insulin pump. The app can determine when insulin is needed and whether a delivered dose was sufficient. The app can also take into account time of day, food consumed, and the patient’s past responses. Gentag hopes that skin patches with microneedles will free children with Type 1 diabetes from having to stick themselves several times per day.

Gentag’s dipstick sensor technology can detect very specific medical conditions. Monoclonal antibodies are used to produce biomarkers for particular pathogens, allergens, cancers, and drug toxicity. There are potentially thousands of biomarkers that can be detected. The urine test for prostate cancer mentioned above uses biomarkers.

Disposable wireless sensors offer additional benefits to makers of consumer health products. Manufacturers can deliver increased value by bundling disposable wireless sensors that help customers use their products more effectively and efficiently. When customers download the free apps that are required to use the disposable sensors, they identify themselves and establish direct communications with the manufacturers.

This is a big deal, because until now non-prescription consumer health products were nearly always purchased anonymously. Free smartphone apps can be used to gather demographic data, to gauge customer satisfaction, and to learn more about how customers use specific products. The apps can also be used to deliver electronic coupons, new product announcements, and health tips. Most manufacturers are likely to conclude that it’s worth the cost of giving away disposable sensors and smartphone apps to learn about and communicate directly with their end users.

There is another intriguing potential benefit of disposable wireless sensors. Modern medicine is highly information-driven, but most physiological data is collected when patients visit a doctor or emergency room. With Gentag’s technology, data can be gathered from people as they go about their daily activities. Large scale tracking of physiological data could help health care providers detect epidemics earlier and more accurately identify the warning signs for specific medical problems. Disposable wireless sensors and smartphones should also make clinical trials easier for both participants and researchers.

Technology is often blamed for the high cost of health care. However, technology has proved essential to driving down costs in industry after industry. By diagnosing health problems earlier and enabling patients to manage medical conditions at home, disposable wireless sensors and smartphones will help produce better outcomes at lower cost. It’s a bit like having a doctor in your pocket.

 

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How To Reduce Healthcare Consumers' Anger ?

How To Reduce Healthcare Consumers' Anger ? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

However, I am not angry at my doctor, my insurance company, the government, or with "the computer." I'm exasperated with the so-called professionals who installed the computer system in my doctor's office. Unfortunately, the incident I'm about to describe isn't one-off.

 

American healthcare's reliance on information technology is an unprecedented and relatively recent change. To make sure that this change is not only "meaningful" but transformative, means it must be done right. Sometimes, more often than necessary, it isn't. Healthcare IT professionals are frequently at fault, and I'd like to recommend how we can do better.

 

A few weeks ago, I called my physician's office and requested that it send a drug refill to my mail order pharmacy, because I would run out before my next office visit. Soon the office called to say that my doctor had sent the order. Great! I would have my prescription in a couple of weeks. Worry free, I could continue my road warrior job traveling to hospitals to help them make sense of the rapidly changing health IT environment. Or so I thought.

By the day before Thanksgiving, I still had no drugs. I was about to run out.

 

I went to my pharmacy's web site and learned -- ouch! -- that it had never received a prescription. Of course, I could not contact my doctor because of the holiday, not even by the following Monday; the staff had been given an extra day off to enjoy their leftover turkey.

 

"Worry free" time was over. On Tuesday, the office receptionist instantly discovered the issue. "Oh! I see what happened. We just changed computer systems and some people's pharmacies didn't get converted right. Your prescription went to the wrong mail order pharmacy." After various back-and-forths, guess what else she uncovered? The new system had reverted me to a three year old address.

 

Now I was angry and still am. This isn't personal. Of course, I "fixed" the immediate problem, forking over an extra $25 co-pay after a few days of heightened cholesterol. No, my anger is about professionalism, or lack thereof, in my chosen field – healthcare IT.

 

As an IT professional, I KNOW this should never have happened. The fault is not with the physician's office, the mail order pharmacy, nor even with the physician's parent health system -- because converting all their physicians to an EHR platform shared with the hospital was a very good idea. No, my finger is pointing at the implementation project manager for a software vendor that I won't name, and a project manager at a consulting firm that I can't name either. One or more of these people bungled their jobs in at least one of these ways:

 

  • Deciding to convert data from the old system to the new system and not doing it right.
  • Neglecting to review the results of the conversion before loading it into the new system.
  • Not having a valid testing/quality methodology to catch the mix-up, or more likely just not making sure it was properly applied.
  • Deciding to go live before the time was right. The project manager perhaps didn't know this, and so failed at his/her job. Worse, perhaps he knew of the conversion issues and didn't have the backbone to call them out and fix them before a go-live that would potentially put patients' health at risk.

IT vendors and consultants must be trusted partners in hospitals' solutions, not perpetrators of needless mistakes and risk. This is healthcare, not Macy's. When we get IT wrong, people can die!

Over my 20+ year career, I've seen a lot happen in healthcare IT. Most of it has been good, but some of it was scary, like the folly described above. When it's scary, it's usually also needlessly expensive. Those expenses eventually roll back to consumers. Hmmm…aren't ever-increasing costs a central element to consumers' anger with our healthcare system? Aside from their frequent frustration with scenarios such as my Thanksgiving experience?

 

Healthcare IT professionals can do better and should. Those who are passionate about their work care whether prescriptions get filled, diagnoses are correctly recorded, and the right healthcare is delivered. They do not see themselves as technicians, but as accountable care-delivery partners with physicians and clinicians. But many consultants and project managers don't go that additional mile or two of accountability -- one that should never be considered "extra." Let me share some principles I've learned that everyone in healthcare IT can benefit from if they really want to contribute to better US healthcare.

 

1. In healthcare IT, be careful with the Pareto principle. There's not a project I've been on where design decisions about how to get an 80% bang for our 20% buck weren't considered. This happens, especially in workflow design, where the healthcare environment is so complex you just can't get to the 100% level.   But you cannot take the same shortcuts with data. If the healthcare data isn't right, bad things happen:

 

  • Physicians rely on inaccurate (and missing) data to make clinical decisions that can injure or kill. There are many reasons for morbidity and mortality in healthcare. Information technology shouldn't be one of them.
  • Incorrect bills that exasperate patients and payers get submitted, which take time and money to fix. If too many of those bad bills get to CMS, it won't be heaven that breaks loose.
  • Items get missed. For example, charges go AWOL, causing the hospital not to be reimbursed. CFOs want to know why their revenue has dropped…CEOs and Boards want to know a lot more.

2. Eliminate unwarranted data conversion costs. Hospitals often spend ten to 100 times what it would have cost to get it right the first time. I'm working with a hospital now that experienced a flawed patient records conversion from their previous billing system. This blunder has required the hospital to maintain their previous billing platform for six years, just to have a place to look up that data. They've paid hardware and software costs, spent immeasurable IT hours just keeping the old platform running, and wasted easily as many billing hours sorting out master patient index issues. Maintenance of this legacy mess is not sustainable. Doing the right thing now – switching to a new platform and converting exactly no patient data is going to be painful, especially when reregistering patients for the first time. The hospital is wisely making this move, after immense unnecessary spending.

 

3. Watch for what you can't see. It's as important as what you can, but a lot harder to verify. It's much easier to find a duplicate charge -- even the payers will be nice enough to point these out – than a missing charge. Once you find the latter, you have to go looking for others like it, and you're likely to discover far more than you feared. A while back, during a random quality audit, my team discovered one account that appeared to be incorrectly adjusted. While the account was in the right queue to be worked, no one had noticed the problem because the payer's incorrect adjustment put the account at zero balance. Because work queries were set to ignore $0 balance accounts, this issue would not have been found were it not for the random audit.

 

4. Outliers are the most critical data. That account I mentioned previously? Once we looked further, we found almost 7,000 accounts over two years that had the same issue. We could have fixed about 90% of them with a query. It was the 10% outliers that hurt. The billing team had to touch all of the affected accounts to correct the write-offs, and refund several hundred patients who were mistakenly billed a balance after the primary payer's error rolled to the secondary payer. Assumptions that all the cases fit a certain pattern lead to dangerous shortcuts.

 

5. It doesn't matter how good your systems are if your processes are poor. I can't count the times I've been called to fix a system issue that actually was a data issue, and that the precipitating problem was the process set up to maintain the data needed by the system. Some examples:

  • Security issues where employees who were terminated had their accounts removed, but physician accounts were left active, because physicians weren't "employees."
  • Hours spent researching why something isn't working, only to learn that the test and production systems (their lookup data) were different, because no one was maintaining the test system.
  • Issues where a queue of missed charges piled up (unseen, of course) because apharmacy interface required a perfect match between the pharmacy system and the charge master, and no one was working the interface rejects list.

6. Finally, it's just as important to push for no-live as for go-live. No question, this is a difficult scenario. You're putting in a new system. You've worked nights and weekends and equally pushed your team in order to make the go-live date. Now, you have to walk into a formal go/no-go decision meeting, complete with all the hospital's executives champing at the bit. As the project manager, you are responsible for making sure that the no-go option really is an option. Remember my previous points: bad data = big costs, and in healthcare if we don't get it right, people can die. Letting a system go live before it's ready is as close to malpractice as letting a patient go home who isn't ready. I've made the no-go decision twice. I even lost my job one of those times. No one died, and the company is still in business. 

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9 Ways Digital Marketing Affects The Outcome Of Healthcare Campaigns

9 Ways Digital Marketing Affects The Outcome Of Healthcare Campaigns | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

While digital marketing has become a mainstay in many different industries, healthcare has been hesitant to adopt digital strategies. But now that more and more medical professionals are seeing the advantages of digital healthcare marketing, many see that it’s high time to embrace a more digital direction.

 

To show healthcare marketers the value of diving into digital marketing,HealthworksCollective.com treated them to these nine key reasons.

 

1. Reduces Cost per Patient Acquisition (CPA)


Did you know that digital outreach can slash overall costs by as much as 50%, down to $149 per patient? Compare this to the cost of TV media, which averages $348 per patient. In addition, digital marketing consistently reduces total marketing spend and increases ROI in practically every industry.

 

2. Targets Patients with Certain Conditions


Digital marketing lets physicians target patients in a variety of ways, including by their condition, gender, age, and zip code. And BIA Kelsey research shows that 97% of consumers use the Internet for local shopping. By optimizing search terms in real time, physicians can yield better results and ROI.

 

3. It’s Modern Medicine


According to McKinsey research, 75% of people want to use digital healthcare services. With patients spending more time online and using mobile resources on a daily basis, digital is the modern way for physicians to practice medicine.

 

4. Brings Better Decisions with Better Data


While traditional marketing methods tend to be hard to track, digital strategies are rather easy to monitor and measure, thanks to a wealth of data-driven technologies. This data allows physicians to make more effective and efficient marketing decisions.

 

5. Helps Brands Stand Out in Search Engines


Marketing Land reports that around 20% of Google searches are health related and more than 70% of these searches result in a first-page click. But ensuring that your brand appears on the first page demands savvy SEO strategies and well-placed paid advertising campaigns targeted to your audience.

 

6. Allows for Personalized Marketing Messages


Digital marketing allows for personally targeting people, rather than sending a general message to the mass media audience. This lets physicians target prospective patients with just the right message, in the right context, at the right time.

 

7. Improves Patient Retention


Having a digital presence makes it faster and easier for patients to locate and reach a physician’s website, digital patient portals, and important information. Patients appreciate this convenience when taking control of their healthcare. In addition, patients also value a physician’s social media presence. In fact, PwC research showed that 41% of patients said that social media engagement will determine their choice of physician and medical treatment facility.

 

8. Increases Patient Referrals


More and more physicians are finding that digital marketing strategies help increase their number of prospective patients, as well as lower the cost of connecting and engaging with them. Plus, digital options make it easy for patients to access and engage physicians, which increases their satisfaction and frequency of referral.

 

9. Enhances the Patient Experience

 

Along with easing and expediting patient access, digital marketing improves the patient experience at every step and stage of their journey. Digital tracking systems make it simple to send regular appointment reminders, as well as respond to patient needs with relevant blog articles, and enhance their overall experience with patient satisfaction surveys.

 

By using digital healthcare marketing strategies, physicians can treat both their patients and their practice to a superior level of care.

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7 Key Focus Areas of Mobile Healthcare Applications

7 Key Focus Areas of Mobile Healthcare Applications | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

We live in a perennially mobile world, managing almost every life activity (from work to shopping) “on the go” – thanks to the “smart” phones that have become such an integral part of lives. The healthcare ecosystem is certainly not lagging behind in embracing mobile technology.

The very term “mhealth” is proof of mobile technology’s relevance in healthcare. Mobile healthcare applications have exploded the care landscape because of their ability to simplify access to care and deliver a superior care experience from both the care providers’ and the patients’ point of view.

Here are 7 key focus areas of mobile healthcare applications that are gaining tremendous attention in today’s care landscape.

1. Easy access to care

Mobile apps have simplified the burdensome task of choosing a care provider, booking appointments, and follow-up sessions with the clinic or hospital. This has drastically reduced waiting times at the doctor’s office and increased the efficiency of the entire care process. With SMS reminders, prepaid options, and 24/7 call options, these apps also provide patients with options of rating care providers, thereby delivering a transparent care ecosystem.

2. Easy interaction between care providers

One of the primary source of delays in the care process is the long waiting period and the never-ending back and forth between multiple care points – doctors, labs, imaging system, second opinions, insurance companies, and pharmacies, for example. Mobile apps create a strong network of care providers who interact productively through apps, guaranteeing a secure and professional platform that enables informed and timely decision-making.

3. Medical record maintenance

Trusted app that effortlessly maintain medical records and patient history have always been on top of the care landscape’s list of priorities. These apps are simple interfaces that facilitate easy recording of diagnosis, examination, medication, and treatment regimens with zero need for multiple sources of data entry and minimal version issues.

4. Remote patient engagement

Delivering a positive patient experience is no longer restricted to focusing just on treatment and diagnostic modalities. It involves providing the patient with complete support – right from easy access to care even from remote. There are many examples of remote patient engagement:

  • Video-call options with patients
  • Engaging in healthcare awareness drives
  • e-Prescription and remote monitoring of medication compliance
  • Remote treatment of patients in remote locations and elderly patients by mapping their vital body parameters and alerting care providers in case of deviations

5. Chronic condition care support

Smartphone apps have become critical support systems in delivering care for chronic conditions such as diabetes. Many apps help patients to efficiently manage their blood sugar levels, maintain a nutrition diary, and transform their lifestyle to avoid the complications of diabetes.

6. Wellness support

Care is no longer associated with the absence of any disease or disorder – it’s also about the wellness of the body and mind. Hence, wellness-related apps are exponentially increasing in popularity, from simple apps that measure the number of steps walked over a specified period and heart rate to apps that track exercise, diet, and sleep. Customized dashboards deliver a clear overview of the health condition of the patient.

7. Continued learning for care providers

Staying up-to-date in today’s care ecosystem requires that the care providers stay on top of every innovation, new disease and condition, novel medical device, ongoing research, and pharmaceutical discovery. Apps that consolidate specialty-specific data and references from across the medical world are hugely popular. Given the nature of the care providers, this service too needs to deliver a 24/7 access to any location – and mobility perfectly fits this bill.
Conclusion – anytime, anywhere care
mHealth is fast becoming synonymous with delivering smart care anytime from anywhere – a super-efficient means of enabling health and wellness. The challenge is to cut through the excessive clutter of mhealth apps and find your right fit and to ensure that your healthcare solution includes mobility-first features. Today’s care world is certainly on its way to fit right in your pocket! So how ready are you to go the mhealth way?

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Cloud Computing Supports Telemedicine Growth

Cloud Computing Supports Telemedicine Growth | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Today’s healthcare professionals enjoy convenient access to a multitude of tools that would have amazed previous generations. Unfortunately, lack of awareness or access to technical experts means that many practices are unable or unwilling to take advantage of the latest technological advances, advances that increase efficiency, security and productivity. Others are intimidated by the technical jargon often associated with eHealth. All that is needed to eliminate all these issues is a partnership with a provider that specialises in the health industry, rather than deal with IT companies that are themselves unwilling to recommend healthcare-specific solutions that they are unfamiliar with.

 

Providers of healthcare solutions are familiar with the inner workings of practices and clinics and can easily review existing processes and recommend solutions that will integrate technology in the best possible manner. They will also support any new technological solutions, leaving medical professionals more time for patient care, which will ultimately provide substantial benefits that aid early diagnosis and prolong lives.

 

Providers without healthcare knowledge will recommend solutions that they are familiar with, ones that are normally selected by traditional commercial enterprises. Such solutions are generally unsuitable for healthcare clinics and practices and often require expensive customisation, assuming that they can even be customised sufficiently to meet existing regulations.
Smaller clinics and practices do not have an on-site IT team and often eliminate IT requirements by automating server maintenance, data backups and archiving using a cloud solution. In such a scenario, it is the provider that is responsible for all of these activities.

 

Telemedicine allows easier collaboration and involves the use of mobile or other internet-enabled devices. Advantages include instant videoconferencing, remote consults, immediate access to electronic health records and the elimination of geographical issues, where patients are unable to visit the practice or clinic in person. These collaborative features are used between medical teams in multiple locations, between mobile clinics and their headquarters and of course can be used by any medical professional on the move.

 

When cloud services are used, connectivity is possible from anywhere a broadband signal is present, whether to a PC or portable device. This is ideal for patients in remote are rural areas and eliminates the time and expense necessary to consult with a specialist in the traditional manner. With videoconferencing, for example, no travel is required yet an excellent service is provided by the healthcare professional involved. Even follow-ups are possible online. Security concerns are also eliminated as a travelling professional accesses data remotely and never stores it on their own personal devices.

 

There are additional cloud benefits for healthcare professionals and these include:


• Scalability – you pay for the amount of space you use and it can be increased on demand


• Automatic updates – the provider’s IT team install security patches promptly


• Disaster recovery – automated regular backups take place and are restored when active data is lost


• Redundancy – multiple broadband connections are available. When one fails, another takes over


• Flexibility – if additional bandwidth is needed, it is readily available. This is not possible with traditional networks


• Works from anywhere – an internet-ready device, a 3G or broadband connection and you are good to go


• Collaboration – depending on requirements, there are specific software applications available to aid collaboration between team members and patients


• Document management – a single document repository allows secure and controlled access to confidential information


• Security – the use of the cloud ensures data is never stored in portable devices, given that thousands are lost or stolen every year

 

• Green-tech – the carbon footprint for each practice or clinic is substantially reduced, with cloud servers using less power per client due to virtualisation technology


• Cost savings – every clinic and practice uses the latest in hardware and software technology but without the initial investment. Ongoing IT maintenance costs are also dramatically reduced

 

When it comes to telemedicine, in addition to data management and document control features, there are software applications available that maximise patient turnover per clinic, improve patient care and even improve follow-up treatment and remote monitoring processes.

 

With benefits of this magnitude and with evolving regulations to embrace technological advances in eHealth, clinics need to install a telemedicine solution sooner rather than later or give competitive advantage to those that adopt now. This is especially true if patients and colleagues are in other geographical areas. In fact, government services are already active for eligible aged-care homes and to patients of Aboriginal Medical Services throughout Australia.

 

 

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Tips To Help Ensure A Successful Surgeon Design Team

Tips To Help Ensure A Successful Surgeon Design Team | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Design surgeons and surgeon design times have been at the core of the significant advances that have occurred in the medical device market in the last few decades. Working with surgeon design teams is inspirational, mentally demanding, and exciting.

 

Let’s assume a new opportunity has been identified that will improve your organization’s financial position. The marketing team has studied the market space—that is, classified at least three types of current and potentially new innovative strategies this opportunity should incorporate (as was described in the March/April 2018 issue of ODT, “Innovation and the Development Engineer”).

 

Once a complete financial plan, which includes cost to develop/introduce, and a sales/marketing plan have both been vetted and approved by the organization’s senior staff, it is time to move ahead to develop the surgeon design team.

 

I have had experience with two different types of surgeon design teams. The first—a “Hub and Spoke” model—was utilized in situations where aligning with a given group of surgeons or an institution would alienate others from using the product once it was released. The second is the more traditional surgeon design team with a group of surgeons selected to work on a project from beginning to end.

 

The Hub and Spoke model concept relies on one or two core key opinion leading (KOL) surgeons to serve as the hub of the wheel. Different surgeons or groups of surgeons meet independently with the KOL surgeon and the development engineering lead at a series of low-key meetings held at various time points to obtain feedback on different aspects of the design. There is a significant amount of reliance placed upon the KOL surgeon as the amount of involvement of the non-KOL surgeons is substantially less than in a traditional surgeon design team model. In this model, the non-KOL surgeons are assisting with validating the market assessments and need requirements, as well as providing market acceptance feedback of the new product later in the process. It is the responsibility of the KOL surgeon and the development staff to turn that information into a viable product.

 

With the more common traditional surgeon design team, assembling a good design team is critical to the success of the endeavor. The product development team needs to work closely with the marketing department in the selection and assembly of the surgeon design team. The selection process is very much like picking players for a team sport. The desire is to pick the most talented team, with personalities that mesh with each other while becoming aligned to win in the same way.

 

The training and clinical experience of the surgeons, the number of surgeons on the team, and their geographic locations are just a few of the important factors to be considered. The surgeon’s CV is a great reference as are their publications to discover where and by whom they were trained, as well as if they have any won any awards or honors. This process helps an organizer begin to understand a surgeon’s philosophy so as to determine if it matches with the objectives of the project. If these elements do not seem to align, it is best to move on. Further, there are other important considerations—is this the first design team the surgeon has been a part of or is it just the most recent? Has he or she been a part of prior design projects, and if so, what has been the success of those products? You need to fully understand the motivation of a surgeon to be a member of a design team.

 

It is critical the surgeons understand the commitment they will need to make to be part of the design team, as there will be meetings and other activities that will take them away from their clinical practice and surgery. Provide an understanding of the duration of the project and the time periods where their involvement will be greater than other periods as the project progresses. For example, one design project required great commitment from the surgeons as it met approximately every two to three weeks and for full weekends. As a result of the commitment from the surgeons and support of the company, a very large implant/instrument project was conceived and introduced in 18 months. Conversely, projects without full commitment from all surgeons has resulted in the opposite effect, significantly delaying the project, and doubling the anticipated time to market. Therefore, if the surgeon is not willing to commit the time, they are not a good candidate.

 

I have had the opportunity to work with a wide group of surgeons from around the world on numerous design teams. All were excellent surgeons, but their interests and how they assisted the design teams varied greatly. There were some true innovators and designers who would design or create their own drawings of new and innovative products. When the product was introduced, they were willing to stand behind the new concept until it was clinically proven, even in the face of being questioned by traditionalists. Others were known for performing clinical studies or understanding the issues surgeons were facing. Still others offered their strengths in addressing the surgical technique. It is crucial to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the members of the design team.

 

Regarding the project itself, it is vital to have the project well-scoped. The scope needs to be flexible in nature but, at the same time, there need to be boundaries in place to avoid creep and to ensure the end results fulfill the original unmet market requirement. What is the new product or service expected to perform and what is it not going to address? What shouldn’t be addressed is, many times, more important than determining what needs to be. Ensure everyone understands the project’s clinical scope, the financial objectives, and the other innovative aspects desired. In order to keep the team focused and grounded as time progresses, it is often necessary to reflect back upon the scope to avoid derailing and delaying the project.

 

Having the development engineer/staff gain the respect of the surgeon design team is also important. The engineer must have a wide base of knowledge to keep multiple elements of the development project within his or her view. As the process progresses, certain elements of the product are being locked down that impact the long-term commercial success, design attributes, manufacturability, inventory costs, marketing/sales, user experience, and clinical outcomes. Throughout the project, subject matter experts (e.g., the surgeons, manufacturing engineers, etc.) will provide input and support, but the development engineer is ultimately the one who must sift through all the information and recommendations to decide which to accept, modify, or reject. As such, the development engineer must be a jack-of-all-trades. Leading a development program should not be handled as if it is a democracy, but rather, as a benevolent dictatorship. The leader must listen, assess the situation, make a decision, and move on. Attempting to satisfy all parties will only cause delays.

 

There are techniques that can be used to help sort through the issues to attempt to make the best decisions. One technique is to note how many times the same concern is raised. If the issue is repeated by numerous surgeons and/or other advisors, it likely requires further exploration. If it is rarely stated or only by one surgeon, it may be safe to consider it a much lower priority. If the factor significantly impacts cost, however, determine how significantly it could impact the marketability of the product.

 

If a new, creative solution is conceived by a surgeon that seems to have originated from out of left field, it should not be automatically dismissed. Instead, challenge the surgeon to “sell” the idea to the rest of the design team. If he or she cannot earn their acceptance, it may be best to move on. This does not mean the concept was not worthy, but perhaps it needs to be sidelined from the current program and examined independently on its own merits at a later time or for a future generation of the product. Some creative solutions may seem like an idea that makes sense, but ultimately, must be considered within the scope definition for the project.

 

When having a design meeting, it is important to know the outcome ahead of time. Since design meetings can sometimes become confrontational, first addressing key topics individually with surgeons to understand their concerns and issues will provide a means to be better prepared for the full meeting and make it more productive. If there are controversial issues to be addressed, have one of the surgeon designers present them, which can also assist in making the meeting more productive.

 

After the concept for the product design has been finalized, enroll a second group of surgeons not part of the original design team to objectively review the new product concept. This can help ensure market acceptance and help identify issues that may have been overlooked. All members of the design team are too close to the project to objectively review the new product. While this review occurs late in the design process, it is still early enough to allow for modifications to be made relativity inexpensively.

 

Surgeon design teams have been and will continue to be a critical element for the advancement of healthcare in the development of new and innovative medical devices. Leading surgeon design teams is a skill a development engineer needs to hone and refine. It involves technical knowledge, psychology, business acumen, and most importantly, strong leadership attributes.

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4 Industries That Find Blockchain Technology Useful

4 Industries That Find Blockchain Technology Useful | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

 

By 2024, the global blockchain market is expected to be worth $20 billion, and according to a recent study by IBM, one-third of C-level executives are considering adopting these technologies. Does that surprise you? Is your organization exploring blockchain or distributed ledger solutions?

 

Recent reports indicate that blockchain has the potential to reduce certain industries’ infrastructure costs by 30 percent. Additionally, there’s a $8-12 billion annual savings for certain industries that use blockchain technology. Let that sink in.

 

Companies of all industry types are using blockchain technology to help them improve transparency, traceability and trust; but here are four industry-specific benefits.

 

  1. Healthcare: Hospitals are now able to seamlessly access patient data shared between member hospitals and participating hospitals.
  2. Banking: Financial institutions are able to simplify and speed up the transfer of funds, while ensuring the identity of the user.
  3. Supply chain: Manufacturers can ensure the authenticity of goods and products with better transparency and accountability.
  4. Insurance: Companies can eliminate common sources of fraud, and use smart contracts to improve efficiency and improve customer experience.

 

With all of these sample use cases, blockchain helps companies increase efficiency and reduce friction. Sirius offers various services to help organizations define and develop their blockchain solution.

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Making your clinic & staff more efficient

Making your clinic & staff more efficient | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Data collection on staff activity allows managers and leaders to determine how their team is spending their time and which activities take up the most of their working day. This post will help make your clinic and staff more efficient.

 

Data collection tools give you a clear picture of how your staff spends their time at work and how they can become more productive.

 

This is important in health businesses, as you are able to determine where your front desk and administration staff are spending their time.

 

I will use one of our clients as an example, they have two clinics and the managers found that there was always a workload on the weekend staff for scanning and administration. The staff that worked during the week were never able to complete the scanning, filing and other administrative tasks during their working day, resulting in a backlog of weekend staff.

 

By using the activity tracking software, they found out that the weekday staff was spending all of their time on the clinical software booking appointments and taking calls. This confirmed that the workload during the week was too much for the staff and allowed the client to justify hiring a new front desk staff member to complete the scanning and filing during the week.

 

You can use the data to:

  • Challenge your staff to spend an hour less a day on emails and use this hour to work on a project
  • Determine the average time staff spend on social media whilst they are in the office and raise alarms if, for example, a staff member has spent more than two hours on Facebook
  • Set yourself some goals, for example, spend less time on administration and more time using the clinical software.

 

A product that we use and is RescueTime. It is installed on all the devices in the workplace and it gives both staff and management a report of their efficiency, productivity, and areas of concern.

 

We use this software to determine processes in our workflow that need to improve and find out how productive we are compared to other staff members.

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Simple Tips to Ensure Clinical Data Security

Simple Tips to Ensure Clinical Data Security | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

While we are aware of the importance of the integrity and security of clinical data, recent onsite surveys conducted by REND Tech showed that more than half of the health businesses in Sydney did not implement strong security policies to protect clinical data.

There are a number of steps that will help you increase the security policies around your clinical data. Below are our top five tips:

 

  • To stop unauthorized internal data access, the server must be protected by an administrator password known only to the management team.
  • To ensure that no viruses or malware products are downloaded on your workstations, all computers must be protected with a business grade antivirus product (not the free version of AVG). We recommend NOD32.
  • Management and IT staff should be the only people allowed to access the server. This includes providing server access to pathology companies, Medicare Local staff and so on. If access is required you need to authorize it first and then notify your IT team.
  • To avoid network hacking, change your router password from the generic password to an administrator password. – If you have a Windows XP machine then you need to consider changing it. Recent studies showed that they are six times more likely to be hacked.
  • Never install software on your business computers that have not been approved and authorized by your IT team. Work computers must host clinical and business applications only.
  • If you access your clinical data remotely then you need to ensure that the remote access application you use is secure and password protected. Never share those details with anyone, including your colleagues.

 

By following the processes above, you should be confident in the security of your clinical data. It is highly recommended that you arrange for a security audit every six months to ensure that all the relevant security policies are in place. Take the opportunity to rate your level of data security.

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How to build a strong business worthy password 

How to build a strong business worthy password  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

DO’s

- Use a passphrase instead of a password

o Using a sentence or phrase instead of just one word can be much easier for you and harder for others to guess e.g. allgoodcowsliketoeatgreengrass or if you want it shorter you can substitute it for, agcltegg

- Use abbreviations or purposely misspelled words

o Love to laugh > Luv2Laf

- Replace some letters with symbols or numbers eg. $ for S, 3 for E

o BEST BOSS > B3STB0$$

- Use punctuation! , -

- If you really have a bad memory maybe use:

o A list of password reminders instead of using the password itself e.g. your favorite place may help you remember tr0p1CALPAR1dice

o Passphrases as they can be much easier to remember rather than an acronym of some sort

o LastPass, KeePass, RoboForm, and password keep all passwords accessible and secure with one password

- a hard time figuring out a password? maybe the best option for you is:

o to use a random password generator! The generator will collect letters, numbers, and symbols for a completely randomized password, the catch with this one though is you may have to write this down somewhere for safe keeping as you may find it hard to remember. There are many free services online you can just search ‘password generator’

 

 

DON’Ts

- Consecutive numbers or letters e.g. abcde, qwerty, 1234,

- Including personal information such as a name or birth date

- Reuse the exact same password for everything

o Even the slightest change within the same password can count as a different password

- Use repeating characters e.g. aaaaa, ttt222, 666

- Make all the characters numbers, uppercase or lowercase letters

- Tell others what your password is

- Keep your password the same forever

- Use words found in the dictionary 

o These words can be much easier to guess and spell

 

Date posted: 2018-03-23 | posted by: ozdoc

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Latest Technologies Improving Patient Outcomes

Latest Technologies Improving Patient Outcomes | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

The Affordable Care Act has encouraged hospitals and other medical facilities to invest heavily in new technology that will improve patient outcomes and increase the number of lives saved on an annual basis. The best solution to produce a cost-effective, yet high quality experience has been to create technology that will prove to be more efficient in the near future. Through closely watching chemical reactions and choosing laboratory air stirrers of the highest quality, the improvement of healthcare technology has been based solely on evidence of what works and what is desired among the medical community. Based upon this assessment, below are three types of upcoming technology that will affect healthcare in a positive manner.

 

Mobile Stroke Units

Mobile stroke units have been highly invested in to provide critical medical care before ever arriving at the hospital. Mobile telemedicine enables staff members to perform blood tests, CT scans, and TPA tests on injured victims. Mobile stroke units are expected to save thousands of lives and radically improve patient outcomes.

 

New and Improved CT Scanners

 

Old CT scanners will soon be replaced by a new model of CT scanner that can capture a faster and clearer photo in one shot. Prior to this technology, many patients were often turned away for having heart beats that were too quick to take the CT scan. As of now, this CT scan can capture a photo of the heart in one shot. As a result, more people can benefit from the CT scan and more people can get an accurate reading on their health.

 

Cancer-Seeing Glasses

A new form of high-tech glasses has been designed to be worn by surgeons during an operation. This technology has been shown as helpful in identifying cancer within patients. The glasses are able to detect cancer cells based upon the blue glow that appears to the trained eye of the surgeon. Cancerous cells and healthy cells are normally difficult to distinguish. These high powered glasses increase the magnification and can spot cancerous cells at even an early stage. These glasses, if used in every hospital, could reduce both the time and money that is necessary to treat cancer and significantly improve patient outcomes.

As healthcare costs account for around one fifth of the United State’s annual GDP, technological investments have been deemed the best way to cut costs while improving the overall quality of healthcare. Investment in technology is predicted to be significant for the future as patients will be getting better in a faster amount of time. Within the next few years, healthcare technology will expand as long as investment and efficiency continue to flourish.

 

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How Your Clinic Can Get Benefit From An Online Scheduling Software 

How Your Clinic Can Get Benefit From An Online Scheduling Software  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Throughout the years, we have had numerous requests from our clinics for an option to have patients book their appointments online. We researched different ways in which we could do this. Originally, the plan was to link with a third party online booking software. We were unsuccessful in finding one that had all the options we were looking for, nor did they store their data in Canada. We then decided that the best course of action would be to write our own Online Scheduler.

 

Having the ability for your patients to book appointments online is beneficial for both the patient and the clinic.

 

The biggest benefit to your patients is that they can book their appointments at any time, from anywhere. No longer will they have to wait until working hours to try and reach someone at the clinic to book their appointment over the phone. Patients can book appointments from the comfort of their own home, office, or even from their mobile device.

 

Patients will be able to book their appointments directly from your website. They will fill in their name and contact information, and select the type of appointment they wish to book. They can then request an appointment date and time. The patient is never shown your schedule; they only have the option to request a date and time. If that particular slot is unavailable, the patient will be asked to select from available nearby appointment times, or to select a different day.

 

The Online Scheduler is completely configurable, and can be accessed through Clinic Essentials at any time. You can control when to allow your patients to book online as well as what type of appointment they have available to book. When the patient sends their request for a particular appointment, you will access it from the View Online Appointments button on the scheduler. You can then Accept or Decline the appointment, and send the patient an email notifying them their appointment has been accepted or declined.  The appointment will then be added to the Appointment Scheduler.

 

With your patients booking appointments online, you not only have increased traffic to your website, but you and your staff can focus on what is most important; patient care.

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Benefits Of E-Prescribing For Hospitals

Benefits Of E-Prescribing For Hospitals | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Many hospitals have switched to using e-prescribing for patient medications. If your hospital hasn’t gotten on board, this may be the time to change your prescribing practices. 

 

A recent blog post from healthcare tech vendor Medsphere discusses the benefits of e-prescribing.

 

The biggest: It keeps patients healthier. The World Health Organization estimates that around half of patients worldwide don’t take their medications as prescribed.

 

Not surprisingly, that has a negative effect on patient outcomes – contributing to readmissions and even death.

 

E-prescribing involves less patient legwork, which may make it more convenient for them to get their medications. When prescriptions are filled electronically, patients have 10% improved medication adherence, according to a study from e-prescribing provider Surescripts. Other research shows similar positive results.

 

Another big benefit to e-prescribing: It’s easier for pharmacists to read prescriptions. And that takes many risks out of prescribing medications, such as errors caused by misinterpreting a provider’s messy handwriting.

 

While some errors involving manual prescriptions are minor, others can significantly affect a patient’s condition. Research has shown that e-prescribing can cut down errors by over 60%, and it’s especially effective for avoiding serious errors that could cause patient harm.

 

Even better – the reduction in adverse patient drug events saves money in many ways. There’s a lower chance of readmission, which means hospitals aren’t using as many staff hours to treat patients. In fact, according to Surescripts, facilities can save anywhere from $100,000 per year for small hospitals to over $1 million each year for larger ones.

 

Besides lower costs, other benefits to e-prescribing include a more efficient workflow and better access to patient information through the system. Improved access can help hospitals spot drug-addicted patients who are “doctor shopping” so they can receive prescriptions for controlled substances.

Questions to ask

Typically, hospitals that send prescriptions electronically do so through their electronic health records (EHR) systems.

Whether your facility is looking to implement an EHR that sends e-prescriptions (which is a requirement for meeting meaningful use objectives), or it’s switching systems and needs different e-prescribing capabilities, here are several questions you need to consider, according to Medsphere:

 

  • Is the solution easy to use for providers? If the e-prescribing program isn’t user-friendly for clinicians, they’re likely to bypass the system and write prescriptions manually anyway. Plus it can slow down workflow and contribute to errors. Make sure you consider doctors’ needs when purchasing a solution.

 

  • What systems do the pharmacies we work with use? Compatibility issues can prevent prescriptions from being transmitted correctly. Double-check with the pharmacies where your hospital sends prescriptions most often and ask how they transmit information – and what network you should be using.

 

  • Is the network secure? You don’t want any sensitive patient protected health information to fall into the wrong hands while transmitting a prescription. So it’s smart to huddle with IT and your vendors to find out what technology is being used to encrypt and protect e-prescriptions when they’re being sent to pharmacies.

 

  • How do we introduce e-prescribing to patients? If you’re just starting to use an e-prescribing system, patients may not be familiar with the concept. Older patients may be especially upset if they don’t receive paper prescriptions. It may be a good idea to explain the details of e-prescribing to patients. And initially, clinicians may want to give them a printed document to take to the pharmacy when they pick up their medications.
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The Healthcare Internet Of Things: Becoming A Reality

The Healthcare Internet Of Things: Becoming A Reality | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Technology is becoming more sophisticated:

 

 As connectivity expands, new mobile devices and wearables – that offer far more sophisticated biometric, fitness and wellness tracking – are entering the market. For example, these more advanced technologies are tracking and reading muscle activity; utilizing spectrometers to measure nutrition in food; keeping tabs on electroencephalogram (EEG) levels; and measuring exposure to ultraviolet light. What is even more interesting, however, is the fact that consumer electronics, wearables and clinical devices are continuing to take on new physical forms – including digital tattoos, under-skin implants and smart contact lenses.

 

Additionally, devices are beginning to better communicate with one another, as we build out interoperable networks. This is the key principle behind the Internet of Things, in general. The possibilities for this growing interconnected network of devices are endless and include:

 

  • Connected refrigerators monitoring food input and output;
  • Connected thermostats that self-adjust temperatures to body heat metrics;
  • Televisions that can connect to real-time data dashboards breaking down your health and recommending consultations with your physician, dietician, therapist or personal trainer;
  • Light bulbs that automatically adjust the emission of UV light to stress levels and time of day.

As these innovative technologies collect a broader array of clinical and fitness data, the information gathered is becoming even more vital for health care companies.

 

Data is being integrated and converging to create a holistic picture. Devices passively capturing more data (biometric, activity, etc.) will continue to integrate together to give a comprehensive overview of a person’s health. In the future, when bringing together biometric data with detailed activity data that extends far beyond what wearables and devices currently offer, insights not previously thought possible will emerge.

 

For example, data from a car related to erratic driving combined with speech patterns from a smartphone can provide detailed insights on a person’s stress level. Taken a step further, analytics programs could integrate that data to help predict a manic episode in a person with mental health issues.

 

Technology partnerships are proliferating. Technology partnerships are vital to creating an interconnected world of devices and interoperability.  Companies are relying on specialized technology vendors to add increased capabilities to their products instead of building it all on their own. Case in point: Polo Ralph Lauren created a connected t-shirt. But the company did not build the sensor technology that already exists. Instead, they focused on their core competency, apparel, and partnered with a technology vendor to add the health tracking sensors.

 

Non-technical and consumer companies will continue to partner with technology companies to add health-focused capabilities to their product or services. We have seen these partnerships are regularly emerging with phone companies, sports teams and automotive companies. 

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Tablet Computers For Healthcare Professionals

Tablet Computers For Healthcare Professionals | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Considering where I work and what I do, my clinical colleagues often ask me for advice when they are shopping for a new computer. Most doctors and nurses are going to be happiest with some kind of mobile solution.

 

After all, doctors, nurses and other clinicians are always on the move. A desktop just doesn’t cut it for most of us who work in healthcare.

 

Tablet computers and convertible devices that can function as tablets, laptops and (when docked) even desktops, are becoming increasingly popular in clinical settings.

 

But all such devices aren’t created equal, especially when you consider the privacy, security and connectivity needs of enterprise healthcare environments. That’s something that has become all too clear for clinicians who in recent years have purchased one of the most popular consumer tablet devices on the market and brought it into work, only to find that it just didn’t deliver what’s needed in that setting.

 

Fortunately, there are now many good choices in tablet devices that will measure up when used in clinical settings. They are available from a  wide variety of manufacturers and come in screen sizes and at price points that are a good match for clinical use.

 

For starters, we’ve come up with some key criteria to help define what we believe works best in healthcare and what you should consider before buying a new device. These are also considerations that IT professionals must consider when purchasing devices to deploy in clinical settings. I like to call this “clinical grade”. 

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