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News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Benefits Of Wearable Technology In The Health Sector

Benefits Of Wearable Technology In The Health Sector | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

When most of us consider wearables, we include devices such as Bluetooth headsets. However, in the medical industry, we expect more from our wearables and only include devices that not only provide a specific function but will also store sensor data for later retrieval by healthcare professionals. This data is then analysed to aid medical diagnosis.

 

In a growing telehealth market, it is these sensor-based devices that will improve healthcare services for millions of patients worldwide. Existing forecasts indicate that the global telehealth spend will increase tenfold within five years, rising to $4.5 billion by 2018.

 

Like any new technology, early adoption figures are quite weak but luckily, in Australia, we are always eager to experiment with new innovations. In fact, a 2014 Kronos survey demonstrates that no less than 30 per cent of Australians already use wearable technology, twice that of our U.S. counterparts. In addition, more than 40 per cent use them for work-related tasks. This high adoption rate is encouraging for future increased use of wearables in the health and fitness areas.

 

For this adoption rate to continue, I believe we need our healthcare providers to embrace the use of wearables, as they are best positioned to encourage their patients of wearable benefits, with the most important being improved care monitoring and increased efficiency for early diagnosis of common ailments. When a medical professional recommends a product, people listen. There are several reasons for this but primarily these include:

 

A company with a commercial interest in the product is unlikely to achieve the same positive response level.


Patients trust their doctors to act in their best interest.
By using these technologies themselves, patients are encouraged to take a more proactive approach to their personal health.
Fitness plans were perhaps the first wearable that provided useful data for medical professionals and were primarily used by those in cardiovascular activities such as running and cycling. Like any product type, the features available vary by model and manufacturer but most are capable of acting as a pedometer and can also record pulse and heart rates. The data gathered by the device sensors is then transmitted to your smartphone using Bluetooth or possibly ANT+ for cycling enthusiasts with bicycle computers. This data is often useful to doctors as it can aid diagnostics, surpassing the original plans for the device as a general fitness monitor.

 

Wearables that are specifically designed for the healthcare industry work in an identical manner. Senses are used to gather data, which is then transferred to another device for later analysis. Smartphones are most commonly used, with apps available for several platforms including Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android, but residential users can also use Wi-Fi to transfer data to the cloud or to another monitoring device.

 

In my opinion, as this technology grows, I believe real-time reporting will be possible, where data is displayed on the health professional’s monitor as soon as new data is uploaded. The exact direction this technology will take requires valuable input from knowledgeable medical professionals. That is not to say that the existing range of devices for the medical industry is limited as this is far from the situation. There are several preventative care devices already on the market and these include:

 

Glucose meters that notify clinics of an emergency situation, ideal for remote monitoring of elderly diabetics
Remote monitoring devices that store information such as blood pressure, temperature, ECG data and more. These can save a vast amount of clinic time, allowing healthcare professionals to prioritize according to patient ailment and creating an environment where early diagnosis is certain for many common ailments.
There are several dedicated devices and applications for monitoring diets, all of which act as a virtual personal trainer who recommends a specific diet according to age and cardiovascular status.
The examples listed above are probably the most common but there are many other devices available that monitor specific conditions. All share the same properties, to gather information and to monitor patients in real-time, thereby improving doctor-patient interaction and the healthcare service provided.

 

The use of wearable technology is a win-win for both healthcare professionals and patients and can reduce individual patient costs while also eliminating unnecessary clinic visits for the patient. For example, if you have high blood pressure and are prescribed specific medication to alleviate the condition, you will no doubt have to make several trips to the clinic to verify that the prescribed treatment is actually working. However, with the use of wearable technology, this is no longer necessary, as the data gathered from the device is simply analysed without travelling to the clinic.

 

Australian healthcare professionals need to adopt wearable technology as soon as possible, given that the benefits surpass any possible costs or training headaches. It is a fact but careful selection of wearable devices and software apps can increase the efficiency of any medical practice, whether it is immediate access to patient data from anywhere, guided surgery, health monitoring tasks and more. Early adopters have already discovered that these solutions can reduce the frequency of clinic visits and related clinic hours per patients.

 

Individual patient costs are reduced substantially but this does not mean that clinics will lose revenue, it merely means that available clinic time is spent treating the seriously ill or patients that require emergency care.

 

Mobile devices, remote data access and analysis with the resulting ability to increase early patient diagnosis are the way of the future. It may take some effort to define the correct processes, workflows and procedures but it is clearly worth it. Can you really afford to ignore the benefits of wearable technology?

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The Promising Future For AI In Orthopedics

The Promising Future For AI In Orthopedics | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

In their most simple form, AI applications in healthcare consist of a collection of technologies that will enable machines to sense, comprehend, predict, act, and learn. The first application for AI-based machines, as discussed at the World Medical Innovation Forum (held in April 2018), is to execute healthcare administrator and clinical healthcare functions. Current technologies are limited because they are algorithm based. The future of AI will make the leap past algorithm-only tools to become indispensable instruments for patients, providers, physicians, and payers. AI has the potential to truly augment human activity.

 

Why This Is Important
The potential to drive improvements in quality, cost, and access has made AI a notable buzzword in healthcare. The AI health market is growing rapidly and is forecasted to reach $6.6 billion by 20211 (Table 1).

 

AI Applications in Orthopedics
AI has demonstrated high utility in classifying non-medical images. A study2 looked at the feasibility of using AI for skeletal radiographs. The study authors compared an AI program against the radiography gold standard for fractures. They also compared the performance of the AI program with two orthopedic surgeons who reviewed the same images. They found the AI program had an accuracy of at least 90 percent when identifying laterality, body part, and exam view. AI also performed comparably to the senior orthopedic surgeons’ image reviews. The study outcomes support the use of AI in orthopedic radiographs. While the current AI technology does not provide important features surgeons need, such as advanced measurements, classifications, and the ability to combine multiple exam views, these are technical details that can be worked out in future iterations for the orthopedic surgeon community.

 

AI in Computer-Assisted Navigation3
Orthopedic surgeons have had access to robotic technology to help them position screws, prostheses, or tunnels for some time, but AI enhanced applications are in development (Table 2). For example, one device utilizes infrared light to locate bones intraoperatively. Another technology uses a form of AI to mill the canal for a prosthesis based on CT scans. In total hip surgery, computer assistance in placing the cup of the prosthesis is reported to have the same accuracy as with traditional methods. In the realm of knee replacement surgery, AI-supplemented robotics technology assists to align prostheses. In spine surgery, AI-enhanced computer-assisted navigation helps surgeons avoid neurovascular structures, and place thoracic and lumbar pedicle screws accurately. It is reported that the incidence of poorly placed screws has reached 42 percent with conventional surgical techniques, according to some studies, but is as low as 10 percent with AI-based computer assistance.

 

We Have Needed a Tool Like AI for a Long Time
AI will change the way healthcare work is performed. AI will fill the gaps we all know are coming in the future, such as the labor shortage in healthcare (Table 3). Through AI, we will empower clinicians and give workers tools to increase their productivity. Healthcare institutions will need an AI-trained workforce and culture. Think of the value your products will bring with AI and the ability to gain clinician face-time and recognition as they use AI to enhance efficiency, quality, and outcomes.

 

The Medi-Vantage Perspective
In almost every strategy research project we manage, when we look at adjacent technologies in consumer markets, we see AI being utilized again and again. Our strategy research helps clients understand the opportunity to integrate AI technology into their product strategies. Someday, even the most common medical devices will have an AI component.

 

Maria Shepherd has more than 20 years of leadership experience in medical device/life-science marketing in both small startups and top-tier companies. After her industry career, including her role as vice president of marketing for Oridion Medical where she boosted the company valuation prior to its acquisition by Covidien/Medtronic, director of marketing for Philips Medical, and senior management roles at Boston Scientific Corp., she founded Medi-Vantage. Medi-Vantage provides marketing and business strategy as well as innovation research for the medical device industry. The firm quantitatively and qualitatively sizes and segments opportunities, evaluates new technologies, provides marketing services, and assesses prospective acquisitions. Shepherd has taught marketing and product development courses and is a member of the Aligo Medtech Investment Committee (www.msbiv.com). She can be reached at 855-343-3100, ext. 102, or at mshepherd@medi-vantage.com. Visit her website at www.medi-vantage.com.

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EMPOWR Porous And Complex Primary Knee Systems

EMPOWR Porous And Complex Primary Knee Systems | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

DJO, a provider of medical technologies designed to get and keep people moving, introduced the EMPOWR Porous Knee System and EMPOWR Complex Primary Knee System at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons (AAHKS). These new additions to the EMPOWR Knee Platform expand one of the industry’s most modern total knee replacement systems, which now offers primary, cementless primary, complex primary, and tibial revision solutions for surgeons and patients.

EMPOWR Porous Knee System is based on two decades of clinical experience and highly porous materials designed to enhance early implant fixation, while creating an ideal environment for both immediate and long-term biologic fixation.1 DJO’s surface coating technologies, including DJO’s proprietary, highly porous coating, P2 aids in bone apposition for superior in-growth performance.1 EMPOWR Porous’ bladed keel has a bone sparing geometry optimized for cementless application.2 The bladed keel of the asymmetric baseplate was developed to provide robust fixation, while the cruciform pegs provide initial component fixation and durable rotational stability.2

EMPOWR Complex Primary Knee System, with the EMPOWR Universal Tibial Baseplate and EMPOWR Varus Valgus Constraint (VVC) Tibial Insert expand the utility of the EMPOWR Knee Platform and provide a wider range of solutions for complex primary and revision knee arthroplasty. These new implant technologies are designed to provide an efficient and seamless transition from standard primary to revision knee procedures, with a minimal number of additional instruments and trays. The EMPOWR Universal Tibial baseplate maintains the EMPOWR System’s characteristic asymmetric footprint which maximizes cortical coverage and prevents component overhang to ensure long-term fixation without tissue irritation4. This baseplate also provides the ability to stem and augment when more supplementary fixation is required. The VVC insert is offered in e+ polyethene, formulated to reduce long-term wear3, while the insert is designed to provide the necessary support and stability in knees with supportive soft tissue deficiencies.

“DJO has a proven record of bringing high-quality products to market with incredible cadence—faster than any other implant company today,” said Dr. Eugene S. Krauss, an orthopedic surgeon with Northwell Health. “In 2018 alone, the EMPOWR Porous Knee and EMPOWR Complex Primary Knee launches have significantly expanded our ability to treat a wide variety of patients in our practices.”

“The efficiency of DJO’s instrument trays and the streamlined instrumentation enables my surgical team and I to perform up to 12 knee replacements in a single day, making the system well-suited for both hospital and ambulatory surgery center environments,” said Dr. Krauss.

Over the past decade, the science of highly porous metals, including DJO’s P2, has significantly advanced, helping to improve implant longevity and ultimately patient outcomes. These scientific advancements coupled with a younger, healthier patient population, have resulted in a resurgence of cementless knee arthroplasty. Therefore, the contemporary design of the EMPOWR Porous Knee, is certain to have a meaningful impact on the market.

“DJO Surgical’s strong growth over the past few years is a reflection of our commitment to developing products and solutions that help improve clinical outcomes and enhance patient experience,” said Jeffery A. McCaulley, Global President of DJO Surgical. “Our continued expansion of the EMPOWR Platform reflects the overwhelmingly positive reaction we’ve received from surgeons and patients since the first EMPOWR Knee System was launched here at AAHKS in 2015.”

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Professional Development Advice from Technology Leaders

Professional Development Advice from Technology Leaders | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

This edition of AppointmentPlus Radio brings together two industry leaders within the tech sector. Raymond Wiley, a general manager with Sun-Tec America, shares the story of how he landed his current position, as well as the philosophy that shapes his professional interactions. Dhruv Bhate, a senior technologist who works in 3D printing, offers insight into how reflection on your true values can lead to a meaningful work life. The two also discuss:

 

  • The importance of finding your professional “sweet spot”
  • How to understand, and communicate your professional value
  • Why defining what you do also mean defining what you don’t do
  • Plus: 5 must-have personal technology recommendations and 2 must-read books to overhaul your professional mindset

 

 

About Raymond and Dhruv: 

Raymond Wiley is the general manager at Sun-Tec America, LLC where he is responsible for the go-to-market strategies for Sun-Tec’s high precision lamination, labeling, and taping equipment portfolio for the Americas and European markets. He is the primary interface between the customer and the Sun-Tec design engineers located in Japan and is charged with overseeing the entire sales process through every phase of the project. Previously, Raymond spent 21 years at Motorola in the Semiconductor Products Sector serving in a variety of increasingly responsible positions including operations manager for the Small Signal and MEMS Sensor Businesses in Japan.

 

Dhruv Bhate is a Senior Technologist at Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) where he leads R&D efforts in Additive Manufacturing, with a focus on high-performance polymers and metals. Prior to joining PADT, Dhruv spent 7 years at Intel Corporation developing laser-based manufacturing processes. Dhruv has a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University and a Master’s from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he developed fracture models for ductile metal alloys and to simulate adhesion in MEMS.

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Medical Software On The Cloud

Medical Software On The Cloud | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

As more and more traditional companies leverage the benefits of the cloud, it’s no real surprise that the healthcare industry has embraced technology, with electronic health records now commonplace. We have provided a cloud-based solution for clinical and practice management software since 2012 and the adoption rate among Australian healthcare practices and clinics grows each year.

 

Cloud for Health allows users of popular clinical software packages (such as Medical Director and Best Practice) to access data from anywhere by simply using their web browsers on any internet-ready device. It allows users to concentrate on core activities without worry about servers, backup maintenance or essential security updates as we take care of all that under our service level agreement(SLA).

 

Other advantages include guaranteed data storage on Australian servers (also a legal requirement) and immediate access to an ideal solution for rural GPs that often need to travel long distances between clinics, allowing the easy use of mobile clinics, taking the practice on tour, so to speak.

 

Doctors located in the middle of the desert can access their clinic records remotely, simply by using a laptop and phone, tethering the laptop to a 3G or 4G connection if available. Alternatively, you can simply use a smartphone , netbook or other portable device with a browser. In times past, you would have needed to log in directly to your practice, with low speed often the result. Not so with the cloud, as maximum performance is always available.

 

As the whole process is browser-based, it’s no longer necessary to have a high-performance laptop for productive tasks. Even older laptops will work perfectly as long as an internet connection is available.

 

Not all healthcare professionals require mobility but cloud hosting has other advantages:

 

  • You no longer need a server and can eliminate associated hardware costs and maintenance issues.
  • Data backups are automated using redundant hard drives, preventing unexpected data loss
  • 24/7 maintenance and support is offered by reputable service providers
  • Software patches and security updates are handled by the service provider


Our aim as a service provide is to remove IT as a consideration for healthcare professionals and let them focus on patient care. Even in extreme situations where all hardware in the practice has failed (due to power loss, fire or water damage, for example) vital clinical data can still be accessed using a mobile phone. The benefit to business continuity is obvious.

 

The majority of clinical software is designed for use with Microsoft Windows, with Mac users often experiencing problems. However, by use of a Citrix Desktop Viewer, the platform does not matter as everything is viewed in a standard browser, regardless of whether the user is on Windows, Android, iOS or MacOS.

 

Coming from a family of doctors, I originally considered offering a free service to make the lives of healthcare professionals easier by allowing them to focus on patient care. However, I decided to implement a licence fee structure, given the variety of experts, hardware and hosting requirements necessary to provide a reliable service. It is true that ‘you get what you pay for’ and a free service would have compromised features and defeated my original goals.

 

The licence fee structure works well and is cost-effective, regardless of the size of the practice, given the backup protection and risk managements solutions that are immediately solved. In addition, we perform a full IT and business process audit to maximise the investment, ensuring that all systems are configured correctly.

 

While some are still reluctant to move to the cloud, due to perceive security issues, I believe these concerns to be ill-founded, especially when you consider that cloud service providers are held to a higher standard than traditional networks. We are subject to regular third party audits that we cannot avoid if we are to retain our IT and industry certification status. By achieving these standards, we publicly confirm that we exercise due diligence in security, data storage and internal disaster recover processes.

 

Therefore, we can offer a complete IT solution with confidence, whether it’s on the cloud, onsite or a combination of both. Eliminate your IT concerns and focus on your business. Contact us for further details.

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Advanced Software Offers Metal Artifact Reduction For Extremities

Advanced Software Offers Metal Artifact Reduction For Extremities | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Carestream Health will demonstrate new optional advanced metal artifact reduction software for its Carestream OnSight 3D Extremity System at the Radiological Society of North America tradeshow (Booth #6713). Carestream’s OnSight 3D Extremity system captures high-quality, low-dose 3D extremity exams. The company’s new metal artifact reduction software is pending FDA 510(k) Clearance.

“Carestream’s second generation of software takes our state-of-the-art original metal reduction software to a new level. It provides enhanced flexibility depending on the metal content present and reduces the visual distortion caused by screws, implants, rods and other metal objects to create improved visibility and diagnostic confidence,” said Helen Titus, Carestream’s worldwide marketing director for ultrasound & CT.

The optional software makes it easier for radiologists and orthopedic surgeons to accurately diagnose a patient’s condition and develop treatment plans. Image processing can be adjusted and optimized according to the amount of metal present.

The software uses information from the original scan to eliminate the need for additional imaging studies, which reduces costs and lowers radiation exposure for patients.

An intuitive touch screen interface allows technologists to adjust for either moderate or complex metal content. The metal artifact reduction software can be activated prior to the scan or it can be applied after the original reconstruction is complete. Both the original and corrected images are always available to view and compare.

The OnSight 3D Extremity System also assists surgeons in detecting occult and non-union bone fractures. Unlike traditional CT systems, this cone beam CT system has a large-area detector that captures a 3D image of the extremity in a single rotation, which takes only 25 seconds. A patient simply places the injured extremity into a donut-shaped opening in the system. Since the patient’s head and body are not confined, patients do not experience the claustrophobia that often occurs with traditional CT systems. Dose is significantly reduced because only the affected body part is imaged.

The compact extremity system can be installed in an exam room and plugs into a standard wall outlet.

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Robotic Arm Offers Self-Help Mobile Rehab For Stroke Patients 

Robotic Arm Offers Self-Help Mobile Rehab For Stroke Patients  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) recently developed a robotic arm to facilitate self-help and upper-limb mobile rehabilitation for stroke patients. The lightweight device enables the patients to engage in intensive and effective self-help rehabilitation exercise anywhere, anytime after they are discharged from the hospital. The robotic arm, called “mobile exo-neuro-musculo-skeleton,” is the first-of-its-kind integration of exoskeleton, soft robot, and exo-nerve stimulation technologies.

Stroke is the third leading cause of disability worldwide1. In Hong Kong, there are about 25,000 new incidences of stroke annually in recent years2. Research studies have proven that intensive, repeated and long-term rehabilitation training are critical for enhancing the physical mobility of stroke patients, thus helping to alleviate post-stroke symptoms such as disability. However, access to the outpatient rehabilitation service for stroke patients has been difficult. Due to the overwhelming demand for rehabilitation services, patients have to queue up for a long time to get a slot for rehabilitation training. As such, they can’t get timely support and routine rehabilitation exercises. Stroke patients also find it challenging to travel from home to outpatient clinics.

The “mobile exo-neuro-musculo-skeleton,” developed by Dr. Hu Xiao-ling and her research team in the Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME) of PolyU, features lightweight design (up to 300g for wearable upper limb components, which are fit for different functional training needs), low power demand (12V rechargeable battery supply for 4-hour continuous use), and sportswear features. The robotic arm thus provides a flexible, self-help, easy-to-use, mobile tool for patients to supplement their rehabilitation sessions at the clinic. The innovative training option can effectively enhance the rehabilitation progress.

 

Dr. Hu Xiaoling said development of the novel device was inspired by the feedback of many stroke patients who were discharged from the hospital. They faced problems in having regular and intensive rehabilitation training crucial for limb recovery. “We are confident that with our mobile exo-neuro-musculo-skeleton, stroke patients can conduct rehabilitation training anytime and anywhere, turning the training into part of their daily activities. We hope such flexible self-help training can well supplement traditional outpatient rehabilitation services, helping stroke patients achieve a much better rehabilitation progress.” Her team anticipated that the robotic arm could be commercialized in two years.

The BME innovation integrates exoskeleton and soft robot structural designs—the two technologies commonly adopted in existing upper-limb rehabilitation training devices for stroke patients as well as the PolyU-patented exo-nerve stimulation technology.

Integration of Exoskeleton, Soft Robot, and Exo-Nerve Stimulation Technologies
The working principle of both exoskeleton and soft robot designs is to provide external mechanical forces driven by voluntary muscle signals to assist the patient’s desired joint movement. Conventional exoskeleton structure is mainly constructed by orthotic materials such as metal and plastic, simulating external bones of the patient. Although it is compact, it is heavy and uncomfortable to wear. The soft robot, made of air-filled or liquid-filled pipes to simulate one’s external muscles, is light in weight but very bulky in size. Both types of structures demand high electrical power for driving motors or pumps, thus it is not convenient for patients to use them outside hospitals or rehabilitation centers. Combining the advantages of both structural designs, the BME innovative robotic arm is light in weight, compact in size, fast in response and demands minimal power supply, therefore it is suitable for use in both indoor and outdoor environment.

 

The robotic arm is unique in performing outstanding rehabilitation effect by further integrating the external mechanical force design with the PolyU-patented Neuro-muscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) technology. Upon detecting the electromyography signals at the user’s muscles, the device will respond by applying NMES to contract the muscles, as well as exerting external mechanical forces to assist the joint’s desired voluntary movement. Research studies found that the combination of muscle strength triggered by NMES and external mechanical forces is 40 percent more effective for stroke rehabilitation than applying external mechanical forces alone.

Rehabilitation Effect Proven in Trials
An initial trial of the robotic arm on 10 stroke patients indicated better muscle coordination, wrist and finger functions, and lower muscle spasticity of all after they have completed 20 two-hour training sessions. Further clinical trials will be carried out in collaboration with hospitals and clinics.

The robotic arm consists of components for wrist/hand, elbow, and fingers which can be worn separately or together for different functional training needs. The sportswear design, using washable fabric with ultraviolet protection and good ventilation, also makes the robotic arm a comfortable wear for the patients.

The device also has a value-added feature of connecting to a mobile application (APP) where users can use the APP interface to control their own training. The APP also records real-time training data for better monitoring of the rehabilitation progress by both healthcare practitioners and the patients themselves. It can also serve as a social network platform for stroke patients to communicate online with each other for mutual support.

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