IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Cloud performance tests reveal the impact of location

Cloud performance tests reveal the impact of location | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

If a cloud-based EHR isn’t fast enough to meet the needs of hospitals and other medical facilities, quality of care will suffer, clinicians and support staff will become frustrated, and provider organizations operating on thin margins will have wasted valuable IT dollars on inadequate technology.

 

Several industry trends make it clear that providers are increasingly confident cloud-based EHRs can deliver data and applications at sufficient speeds because vendors have dramatically reduced latency. Epic Systems, the largest EHR vendor in the U.S., began offering cloud services in 2014 to medical groups and small hospitals. The company said in 2016 that it has seen a big shift among its customers toward cloud-based systems. One of those customers is University of California San Diego Health, which announced in August 2017 that it is migrating its Epic EHR to the cloud.

 

Cerner has also revealed that a number of healthcare systems are moving onto its hosted cloud environment. Inspira Health Network, a nonprofit healthcare organization that serves communities across New Jersey, and Bay State, an integrated health system in western Massachusetts health system, have both moved to Cerner’s cloud hosting model.

 

Another EHR vendor, Athenahealth, offers only cloud-based EHR services to its network of 56 hospitals and 106,000 providers that serves more than 100 million patients. Ellenville Regional Hospital in upstate New York, reports that running its EHR on a single network gives staff in all departments real-time access to patient records.

 

For health systems that will select their own cloud host, after considering the cost of strategic planning and security, the success of a migration ultimately rests on performance. Can EHR data, applications and services be delivered fast enough to support the needs of clinicians? Cloud performance is generally measured by average latency which represents the delay between the time when a client computer requests data and the cloud platform responds.

 

Tests have shown that distance between the cloud provider and the enterprise can have a significant impact on latency with delays of as much as 50 percent when the cloud is at a great distance.

 

Cedexis tested services and found distance was a leading indicator of performance

 

Monitoring company Cedexis performed tests throughout the United States that quantify this. Tests were performed on all of the major cloud platform vendors. The determining factor in latency performance was distance from the test client system to the servers at the cloud data center, with a deterioration of as much as 50 percent seen over longer distances within the same region.

 

For example, tests performed in the northwest region recorded latency was as low as 63 ms. when the cloud was near; a latency of 92 ms. was recorded on a cloud system at a greater distance from the test location. A test on cloud platforms in the northeast found 66 ms. latency on the low end and 78 ms. on the high end.

 

A number of vendors offer cloud performance tests that are free to be used during an evaluation process. One example is

 

CloudHarmony who offers a free service that will test performance for many of the leading vendors at a variety of their geographic locations. The test, at Cloud Harmony Speed Test will provide results for DNS query, downlink and latency.

Integration challenges


Migrating an EHR system to the cloud rarely is an all-or-nothing process. Rather, many healthcare IT managers are moving incrementally, evaluating the success of each application migration, learning from mistakes, and carefully preparing the next move based on need and experience. For example, some may decide to first migrate back-office or HR applications, and eventually, migrate clinical apps and billing data at a later date. Providers certainly can choose a one-shot migration to the cloud, but they run the risk of network and system disruptions, loss of productivity, and bandwidth limitations.

 

After cloud migration goals are set, computing models are chosen, and a migration plan established, healthcare providers can begin choosing a CSP (or more than one). For providers with concerns about potential latency issues, selecting a CSP with a hosted location close to the provider’s facilities makes sense. The provider’s IT staff and the CSP can then begin the cloud migration. This process involves addressing several integration challenges.

 

Perhaps the primary challenge is to prevent disruptions to systems or services during or as a result of the migration that would impact clinical care, staff productivity, or IT processes. Other challenges include protecting and backing up migrated data and connecting to and integrating disparate systems.

 

Integration may involve linking cloud-based apps and data with non-cloud apps in legacy systems. “An illustrative scenario could involve a multi-hospital operation which chooses to retain on-premises EHR for inpatient operations but wants to leverage public cloud services for geographically distributed outpatient clinics,” according to the Cloud Standards Customer Council (CSCC).

 

The CSCC argues that a successful cloud EHR migration depends on security and network connectivity.

 

“Whether you are ensuring insurance coverage for the public, developing the next generation of cancer drugs, or providing critical care/tier I trauma services, the new emphasis is being put on providing network availability, performance and security,” CSCC writes. “Although creating a highly available network might be expensive, those costs can be offset by the capabilities provided to the organization.”

 

The vast majority of healthcare providers today have moved or are moving applications, infrastructure, or development platforms to the cloud because they recognize the performance benefits and cost savings. For a cloud migration to pay off, providers must develop a realistic migration strategy and goals, choose the appropriate cloud computing and services models, find one or more CSPs whose services, support, and pricing match their needs and ensure that their networks have the bandwidth capacity to handle cloud-based workloads.

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5 advantages of cloud computing and how they can benefit your practice

5 advantages of cloud computing and how they can benefit your practice | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

While the specialty may vary, practices of all sizes across Australia are turning to the cloud to run their business. With the launch of Clinic to Cloud (C2C) in early 2015, over 1200+ healthcare professionals, operating from hundreds of different practices are now computing with our cloud-based platform. With new clinicians joining C2C daily, benefits of the cloud services are now being widely recognized and accepted as the norm.

 

So if you’re looking to open a new practice for the first time or hoping to migrate your existing practice to the cloud, let’s look at 5 advantages of cloud computing and how your practice can benefit:

 1. Staying in touch

Cloud computing is storing and securely interacting with data over the internet, rather than your computer or local server. That puts connectivity and real-time data as the clearest advantage of working on the cloud. Yes, someone changed the WIFI password without telling you or the careless construction worker nearby didn’t check before drilling. However, one can argue that servers fail and files get lost. The internet is truly an essential resource, which is why it has become so readily accessible and available from multiple sources, smartphone, portable WIFI device, personal connection, net hubs at cafes, offices and even some commercial planes will essentially keep you connected.

 

What does this mean for the clinician? Not only that your data is stored in state of the art datacentres, as long as you are connected, but you can also run your practice.  Control you practice on-site, from home, hospital, on break at your favorite café or even on the flight to your next medical conference from a desktop or mobile device. Full connectivity anytime, anywhere – this is the cloud.

 

  1. Tools of the Trade

Smartphones, tablets, and ultrabooks are essential tools for any busy working professional. With top cloud services offering dedicated mobile apps, working on the go also means working with your indispensable devices. Like the stethoscope to the physician or the scalpel to the surgeon – The Clinic to Cloud App gives you the tools to stay conveniently connected with your practice whilst on the go. For time-poor clinicians, buying time during your super busy schedule comes from having your entire practice visible from your smartphone.

 

  1. That new software smell

Top cloud providers are regularly updating and improving their software. The moment updates are released, they are made available for the benefit of all customers. You would have noticed those design changes and new features on your social media account without you manually needing to install or upgrade anything. Simply log in and updates are there. Clinic to Cloud follows suit, we typically update every 3 to 4 weeks to better user outcomes and reduce practice costs. On release date, all our subscribers then benefit with the best part being at no extra cost. For the clinician - you are not wasting time having to update your practice software or pay for often expensive IT support to run updates. It’s cloud and it’s simple.

 

  1. Soft on the Wallet

Moving to the cloud can save you large capital expenditure, as you do not have to purchase expensive servers and other I.T hardware to host your data or run your software. Accessing your cloud application, in many cases, simply requires an internet capable device (smartphone, tablet, or computer) and an internet connection. Not to mention, local servers also have expensive on-going maintenance and repair costs and backup requirements as well. Clinic to Cloud does not require complex IT infrastructure and server equipment with messy cabling disrupting the feng shui of your practice. A modern desktop or laptop computer and you are on your way to the clouds.

 

  1. Security and Data

One of the concerns with Cloud is typically security and many are concerned about the safety of Cloud hosted software applications. Although we understand the feelings behind the concern, studies have shown that the cloud is safer than on-premise servers that are susceptible to virus and hardware failure and data loss daily. Cloud solutions can be compared to Airline travel; they remain the safest way to do business.  At Clinic to Cloud, we have taken additional security measures such as to Factor Authentication and high levels of encryption.

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Keep Your Appointments Afloat! 

Keep Your Appointments Afloat!  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Summer can be a busy time for sailing and boating businesses as people flock to the beach, bays, rivers and lakes for a fun day on the water. Online scheduling software from Appointment-Plus can be the perfect partner for operators looking to spend less time booking reservations and more time on the water with their customers.

 

Used by businesses coast to coast for scheduling sailing lessons and booking boat rental reservations, Appointment-Plus helps these operations automate and streamline their appointment-setting procedures with such functionality as online self-scheduling, which allows customers to view availability and book their lessons and reservations online, 24 hours a day; automated e-mail and text message reminders, which inform customers of their upcoming appointments and reservations; accurate recordkeeping and report-generating features; and e-marketing capabilities for sending current and past customers information on specials, discounts and other news.

 

“Sailing and boating businesses provide fantastic recreational opportunities for individuals and families throughout the nation,” says Jeff Fleming, marketing director at Appointment-Plus. “Our software helps automate and streamline the entire appointment- and reservation-scheduling process, allowing them to spend more time focused on their operations and their customers.”

 

A Software as a Service (SaaS) application, Appointment-Plus is Web-based and accessible from any Internet connection. This gives operators the ability to access their scheduling calendar from outside of their home or office. Additionally, Appointment-Plus does not require a Web site, expensive hardware or time-consuming installations to use. Pricing starts at $39 per month with no long-term contracts and free set-up assistance with a dedicated coach.

 

Businesses that utilize the online self-scheduling feature can expect a significant drop in the number of phone calls from customers looking to book appointments and check availability. This functionality is especially beneficial if the operator does not have an office or receptionist and routinely takes phone calls at the dock or on the water while giving lessons.

 

“Just think of the convenience of allowing your customers to schedule their lessons or reserve their watercraft at any hour of the day and at their own convenience,” Fleming adds. “Plus, you’ll spend less time answering the phone call and returning messages.”

 

Appointment-Plus supplies almost 4,000 clients throughout the United States, Canada and 10 other countries the tools they need to schedule customer and patient appointment times, book rooms, accept registrations and many other services. Geared primarily toward small businesses such as doctors’ offices, spas, health clubs and massage therapists, users of the service also include Fortune 500 companies; colleges and universities; healthcare agencies and facilities; federal and local government; and freight and delivery companies.

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Making your clinic & staff more efficient

Making your clinic & staff more efficient | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Data collection on staff activity allows managers and leaders to determine how their team is spending their time and which activities take up the most of their working day. This post will help make your clinic and staff more efficient.

 

Data collection tools give you a clear picture of how your staff spends their time at work and how they can become more productive.

 

This is important in health businesses, as you are able to determine where your front desk and administration staff are spending their time.

 

I will use one of our clients as an example, they have two clinics and the managers found that there was always a workload on the weekend staff for scanning and administration. The staff that worked during the week were never able to complete the scanning, filing and other administrative tasks during their working day, resulting in a backlog of weekend staff.

 

By using the activity tracking software, they found out that the weekday staff was spending all of their time on the clinical software booking appointments and taking calls. This confirmed that the workload during the week was too much for the staff and allowed the client to justify hiring a new front desk staff member to complete the scanning and filing during the week.

 

You can use the data to:

  • Challenge your staff to spend an hour less a day on emails and use this hour to work on a project
  • Determine the average time staff spend on social media whilst they are in the office and raise alarms if, for example, a staff member has spent more than two hours on Facebook
  • Set yourself some goals, for example, spend less time on administration and more time using the clinical software.

 

A product that we use and is RescueTime. It is installed on all the devices in the workplace and it gives both staff and management a report of their efficiency, productivity, and areas of concern.

 

We use this software to determine processes in our workflow that need to improve and find out how productive we are compared to other staff members.

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Tablet Computers For Healthcare Professionals

Tablet Computers For Healthcare Professionals | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Considering where I work and what I do, my clinical colleagues often ask me for advice when they are shopping for a new computer. Most doctors and nurses are going to be happiest with some kind of mobile solution.

 

After all, doctors, nurses and other clinicians are always on the move. A desktop just doesn’t cut it for most of us who work in healthcare.

 

Tablet computers and convertible devices that can function as tablets, laptops and (when docked) even desktops, are becoming increasingly popular in clinical settings.

 

But all such devices aren’t created equal, especially when you consider the privacy, security and connectivity needs of enterprise healthcare environments. That’s something that has become all too clear for clinicians who in recent years have purchased one of the most popular consumer tablet devices on the market and brought it into work, only to find that it just didn’t deliver what’s needed in that setting.

 

Fortunately, there are now many good choices in tablet devices that will measure up when used in clinical settings. They are available from a  wide variety of manufacturers and come in screen sizes and at price points that are a good match for clinical use.

 

For starters, we’ve come up with some key criteria to help define what we believe works best in healthcare and what you should consider before buying a new device. These are also considerations that IT professionals must consider when purchasing devices to deploy in clinical settings. I like to call this “clinical grade”. 

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Every internet-connected device is a potential privacy risk

Every internet-connected device is a potential privacy risk | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Samsung has caused controversy with the revelation its voice-recognition system enables internet TVs to collect sounds and send them to a third party, including any sensitive information you might happen to talk about in front of the box.

While this warning is alarming for the privacy-conscious, it's a microcosm of a much larger threat that many in the consumer security business have been warning against  and which you can expect to hear more often.

Devices that require personal input and the collection of personal data to function — be it via voice, camera, location or otherwise — have been a part of our lives for years, and are only increasing.

Here is a list of some of the household and personal items snooping on you:

Smartphones

A small box that can collect location data, detect motion, store audio and video plus keeps track of your online activities, your phone provides a way for most of your apps and services to "listen in" on you in one way or another, not to mention a microphone which researchers have manipulated to spy .


You can easily control when a Samsung Smart will and will not collect voice data, the company says.

Apple's Siri, for example, functions almost identically to Samsung's voice recognition.

These services rely on a dedicated voice-recognition service somewhere in the cloud to take your complex requests and queries, translate them into understandable text, and send them back to your phone or TV.

While they may not be actively listening 24 hours a day, at the very least they are monitoring the microphone's feed in expectation of a command.

Video game consoles

Microsoft's Xbox One and its attached Kinect sensor works the same way, but adds video to the mix as well. Kinect keeps track of the people in a room so it can detect who's present and load their preferences accordingly, or zoom and pan the camera to make sure everybody is in frame during a Skype call.

Microsoft faced backlash in 2013 for its zealous attitude toward collecting data from Kinect (which eventually forced it to dial back its plans) and, coincidentally in the same year, LG landed in some strife for a voice-activated TV that was found to send voice recordings online.


The Smarter Wi-Fi Coffee Machine. It knows when you wake up or when you're likely to get home so it can greet you with sweet caffeine. Photo: Smarter

Coffee machines and airconditioners

A device that "listens" before using the internet to provide us with a service is not a new idea. The trigger for controversy, it seems, is the revelation that a device could do that without us explicitly telling it to. Yet this is the cornerstone of many devices and services we use every day (including web browsers, social media, smart public transport cards, Google Now etc) and will continue to be so as we move towards the all-connected "internet of things". 

A connected coffee-maker, for example, collates data about when you're home so it knows when to make coffee. Ditto for connected airconditioners. Both devices are soon to be (or already are) on the market, and necessarily "listen in" on your life and activities, collecting data on you so they can do their job. LG already has an voice-command airconditioner that literally "listens in", cooling the room if you yell out that it's too hot.


Your phone provides data on your movements, purchases, preferences, searches, and communications to countless apps and services. Photo: Reuters

Is this form of data collection really so scary considering the reams of information we already gladly hand over to the companies that provide our email, maps or ride-share services? Are we really concerned about Samsung's microphones in our house and fine with the microphone, GPS and camera we take around in our pocket literally every day?

A common piece of advice when it comes to the internet is "if you don't want the whole world to hear about it, don't say it online". Increasingly, we not only have to apply this test to emails and facebook messages but to the data we allow our appliances and devices to collect as well. If it's connected to the internet, assume this data is being transmitted online.

Some privacy-minded folks advocate active avoidance, keeping the use of these devices to a minimum, disabling settings or placing a piece of sticky tape over your device's data-collecting apparatus.

Others take pride in their old-school Nokia phones, dumb TVs and ability to "stay off the grid".

But most of us give up information about ourselves constantly because it gives us access to incredible conveniences and technology, and we can't have our cake and eat it too.

Yes, companies like Samsung and Apple and Microsoft must be transparent about what they do with our data, and to whom they give it. But if the last year or so of data breaches, wide-scale hacks and government snooping has taught us anything, it's that no data stored or transmitted online is safe from prying eyes.

In the end we have no absolute control over where our data goes.

The best we can do is be informed about what data our devices are collecting, and if you really don't want something transmitted online, take Samsung's advice and don't say it where an internet-connected TV can hear you.



Via Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry, Gust MEES, Oksana Borukh, Paulo Félix
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Is it ok to store my clinic data in the cloud?

Is it ok to store my clinic data in the cloud? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

If like me you enjoyed gazing out of the window at school, watching the clouds go by during double maths this is for you. Everything seems to be in the cloud these days; music, pictures and all the app things I use to try and make my life a little easier. But as much as I enjoy gazing upwards what is it all really about? What does it mean for you and your clinic? Let’s start at the beginning.

What is the cloud?

In the simplest terms, the cloud means storing and accessing data and programs over the Internet instead of your computer’s hard drive. That’s probably almost as much as you need to know but please read on!

 

When you store data on or run programs from the hard drive, that’s called local storage. Everything you need is physically close to you, which means accessing your data can be fast and easy, for that one computer. But there are downsides. When information is only stored on your computer’s hard drive you are at risk from all of the usual dangers in life; coffee spills, loss of computer …. computer dying, I’m sure we all have stories along those lines. So what does it mean to have your information in the cloud?

 

Well, “The Cloud” is a buzzword that suggests everything is floating in the sky. But the reality is that the cloud is not floating above our heads, it is a physical infrastructure, its many computers all over the world. Unsurprisingly many people don’t take the time to wonder where their data actually goes or how it gets there they are just happy that it works.

What are the benefits to working in the cloud?

Working in the cloud can allow your clinic to be nimble, efficient and cost-effective. If your clinic quickly needs access to more resources, it can be scaled up quickly in the cloud. Also, if you experience any of the events mentioned above which would have a serious impact on your business your information will be safe as it’s not directly inside the damaged or lost computer. I hope that all makes sense now? Now for the really clever TM3 bit.

Cloud and Data storage

At Blue-Zinc we have a systems team who manage and develop the TM3 business cloud and as we are always trying to improve things we came up with the best possible solution available. The team has taken the flexibility of the cloud but rather than having your information roaming on random servers somewhere your data is stored in the UK (data centres certified with ISO 27001 and ISO 9001) on dedicated servers which Blue-Zinc own and the guys lovingly maintain and polish on your behalf. Security patches are regularly applied to our servers to ensure that any vulnerabilities are patched as soon as they’re identified. In addition, the SQL server database with encrypted VPN services gives users the highest levels of security available and all data is automatically backed up for you!

Feature-rich private practice software

So, with TM3, you have flexibility and safety all in one. It also means that you have access to our other cloud services Pronto, Online bookings and many more features which 10,000 practitioners worldwide enjoy on a daily basis. So, for now, my head might be in the clouds but at least I know where my data is!

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What is telemedicine involved and how much does it cost? 

What is telemedicine involved and how much does it cost?  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Now that the use of telemedicine is surging to an all-time high, organizations can easily get lost in implementing the technology just to stay on top of the latest and greatest, but it is easy to get lost in the vast amount of telemedicine technology and equipment options available.

 

If you are researching your telemedicine options, applying for a grant or just need to put your budget plans together, here are six key elements and associated costs for you to consider.

1. Medical Devices for Specialties

The specific medical devices you need may vary depending on the specialties you plan to serve with telemedicine. The good news is you don't need to have all the answers right away because many equipment providers have scalable and modular telemedicine systems. This means you can purchase just what you need to get started and then add additional devices later on as your program expands into additional specialties. 

 

The cost of medical devices for basic primary care services can range from $5,000-$10,000, and this would include devices such as an examination camera, ENT scope, and digital stethoscope.

2. Communication Platform and Video Conferencing Needs

How you plan to manage the patient-to-remote encounter is also a key component to consider for clinical telemedicine applications. Since you are communicating a patient's critical diagnostic data, the optimal choice is to do it securely and in real time. After all, the beauty of telemedicine is the functionality to have a live interaction between a patient and a remote specialist.

 

AMD Telemedicine recommends using a Web-based encounter management portal to communicate and aggregate medical device data and share it live with the remote physician. This is truly the best way to offer telemedicine services that are as close to an in-person visit as possible. For video conferencing, it is best to first evaluate any video conferencing investments your organization might have already made to see if these can be leveraged for your current application. Many times they integrate seamlessly with encounter management platforms.

 

Depending on your video conferencing needs, you can complement a Web-based telemedicine portal with either software- or hardware-based video conferencing. To go the software-based route can cost as little as $1,500 per patient site with no cost for the remote provider. The cost for hardware-based video conferencing can start around $10,000 per patient site and increases with the number of remote provider sites you need.

3. Packaging Design and Mobility

Telemedicine carts, cases, wall mounts, and other equipment are all just various ways to package the telemedicine hardware and software. Although there is a difference in how aesthetically pleasing they are (or are not), the main thing to keep in mind is whether this packaging will fulfill your intended use, not just now but also in the near future.

 

Ideally, you want a telemedicine cart or case that is modular and can be easily configured for additional medical specialties so it can evolve with your program. For some applications, such as school-based health centers or long-term care facilities, it is helpful to select a telemedicine system that is an all-in-one package. This helps streamline the purchasing, maintenance, and support for those that don't have a dedicated IT team for their telemedicine programs. All-in-one telemedicine systems that include the telemedicine software, primary care medical devices and the mobile cart/case can range from $20,000 to upward of $28,000.

4. Bandwidth and Internet Connection Recommendations

You may be pleased to know that you don't need to invest in a significant infrastructure overhaul to make telemedicine a reality for your clinic. Of course, your specific needs will vary depending on factors such as location and size or your organization, but the most important consideration is not how much bandwidth you need, but rather how reliable and consistent your bandwidth is.

 

The most common Internet connections are shared with others, which can cause the upload and download speeds to lag and be interrupted at busy times. So finding a reputable Internet service provider with a commitment to reliable service is the first step. If possible, purchase a business-grade service so you experience a more consistent bandwidth capability to ensure your real-time data is not interrupted or compromised in any way.

5. Training

You already staff your organization or practice with top-notch doctors and nurses, so the next step is to provide these health care professionals with the skills and knowledge they need to best make use of your new telemedicine technology in daily operations.

 

Fortunately, clinical telemedicine equipment training isn't a complicated need to meet, especially if your staff has any familiarity with basic medical devices and modern communication technology.

 

There are two types of training programs to ensure the long-term success of clinical telemedicine programs: user training for clinicians and nurses, and technical training and installation for the IT staff. Training programs like these can range from $200 to $2,000 per site depending on the complexity of equipment, the number of users and other factors. Additionally, the American Telemedicine Association is a fantastic resource for training and education.

6. Support

Finally, the increased reliance on network connectivity and Internet technology at your office means that you'll need to ensure that you have adequate IT staff support. This is likely more of a concern for smaller practices that may not have an in-house IT department. It's a good idea to talk to your telemedicine vendor to determine if it provides installation services, as well as what technical support options are available if you don't have an IT staff of your own.

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Doctors Software for Clinic Management  

Doctors Software for Clinic Management   | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Clinic business is extra complicated than ever, with Doctors Software for Clinic Management, you get easy solutions for each part of your routine work, from scheduling appointments to billing. We take care of your business by providing the perfect solution so you take care of your patients more efficiently. Doctors Software for Clinic Management was designed with the help of a medical doctor and clinic staff to make it a fit choice for your working environment. Our Doctor’s module is easy to use. Connection with Labs, Pharmacies and more, make your work easy and quick and it works the way you work.

 

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is an efficient and automatic way of dealing with health facility with options like Doctor’s appointments, administrative activities, patient’s treatment history, diagnostics information, and billing, etc. Doctor’s software for clinic management is good for a hospital with single/multiple locations. It was developed keeping in mind the small and medium-size polyclinics too, and the focus was especially on portability and ease of use. Doctors Software for Clinic Management covers most of the standard features often found in software made for clinics or hospitals.

 

Ease of use, manageability, multi-user functionality, the fast information retrieving in Doctors Software for Clinic Management are exemplary as compared to other such programs. Deciding to use Doctors Software program based on the cloud platform is very cost effective for the clinics. Doctors Sofware for Clinic Management is a good choice for the small as well as huge hospitals or clinic setup. It requires no much expenditure on equipment, hardware or trained IT staff. Those are the resources that a health facility, assisting an in-house IT setup to have to utilize, which are costly. This optimized Doctors Software for Clinic Management is updated, configured and maintained within the cloud through the skilled IT professionals. The users are, hence, free from the burden. It results in price saving and the staff pays attention to the main functions of the Clinic.

 

Easy to use, and Efficient

Doctors Software for Clinic Management gives rapid, simple and easy solutions for the Hospitals or Clinics to manage daily tasks. It allows for streamlining report generation, inventory management, patient management, employee’s attendance and other tasks. Doctors Software for Clinic Management smoothly integrates with your workflow. This cloud-based software program easily distinguishes scheduling for different physicians and a simple interface that consists of tabs for speedy switching across different features and functions. With these features, an easy to use patient portal, detailed reporting, and customizable workflow, Doctors Software for Clinic Management covers the various aspects of clinic management and administration.

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is very easy to use, and effective software program to control the management process of clinic or hospital. This Software Program is one of the best for individual Doctor Clinic or a hospital. In case you are looking for easy to apply and easy to keep software in your clinic or small health center, this software program is best for you. At a very affordable price, you not only get the software but also free training and support from our company.

A Product of EVision Techno Services

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is a Module of EVision’s Hospital Management System.

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A Wireless Doctor In Your Pocket 

A Wireless Doctor In Your Pocket  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

A combination of disposable wireless sensors and smartphones is about to make health care more personal, immediate, and affordable. New solutions are emerging that harvest real-time health data and respond with on-the-spot warnings or suggestions. This technology will not only produce better outcomes, it will help extend the benefits of modern health care to people in developing countries and keep consumers everywhere better informed about the latest health products and practices.

The disposable wireless sensors being developed and commercialized by Gentag, Inc. are a good example. The sensors are intended for use by consumers and come packaged as either skin patches or specimen dipsticks. Gentag believes there is a huge global market for sensors that can be mass-produced, are easy to use, and work with popular smartphones and tablet computers.

Unlike telemedicine, which was conceived to conquer distance, Gentag’s technology is mainly about immediacy. Consumers can use skin patches and dipsticks at their convenience in their homes and workplaces. Smartphone apps provide instant feedback and can automatically forward results to caregivers. Problems can be spotted in their earliest, most treatable stages and therapy can begin at once.

Disposable sensors offer significant savings over traditional solutions. Most of the sensor designs lend themselves to high-volume mass production. They work with smartphones that consumers already have or are expected to have in the near future. And disposable wireless sensors avoid the costs associated with traveling to and using outpatient labs.

Gentag’s skin patch sensors typically consist of printable chemical strips and near field communications (NFC) chips. The chemical strips can test and measure parameters such as body temperature, skin moisture, and (with the aid of microneedles) blood glucose. NFC makes collecting the results as simple as a waving a mobile phone over the skin patch. (NFC sensors don’t require batteries because the phone provides the power.) Using NFC to read a sensor also helps avoid human error. Dipstick sensors can test specimens such as urine for pregnancy, prostate cancer, and other conditions.

The disposable wireless sensor-smartphone combination can be used to manage serious medical conditions. A smartphone app for managing diabetes can collect blood glucose readings from a skin patch containing microneedles and send commands to an implanted insulin pump. The app can determine when insulin is needed and whether a delivered dose was sufficient. The app can also take into account time of day, food consumed, and the patient’s past responses. Gentag hopes that skin patches with microneedles will free children with Type 1 diabetes from having to stick themselves several times per day.

Gentag’s dipstick sensor technology can detect very specific medical conditions. Monoclonal antibodies are used to produce biomarkers for particular pathogens, allergens, cancers, and drug toxicity. There are potentially thousands of biomarkers that can be detected. The urine test for prostate cancer mentioned above uses biomarkers.

Disposable wireless sensors offer additional benefits to makers of consumer health products. Manufacturers can deliver increased value by bundling disposable wireless sensors that help customers use their products more effectively and efficiently. When customers download the free apps that are required to use the disposable sensors, they identify themselves and establish direct communications with the manufacturers.

This is a big deal, because until now non-prescription consumer health products were nearly always purchased anonymously. Free smartphone apps can be used to gather demographic data, to gauge customer satisfaction, and to learn more about how customers use specific products. The apps can also be used to deliver electronic coupons, new product announcements, and health tips. Most manufacturers are likely to conclude that it’s worth the cost of giving away disposable sensors and smartphone apps to learn about and communicate directly with their end users.

There is another intriguing potential benefit of disposable wireless sensors. Modern medicine is highly information-driven, but most physiological data is collected when patients visit a doctor or emergency room. With Gentag’s technology, data can be gathered from people as they go about their daily activities. Large scale tracking of physiological data could help health care providers detect epidemics earlier and more accurately identify the warning signs for specific medical problems. Disposable wireless sensors and smartphones should also make clinical trials easier for both participants and researchers.

Technology is often blamed for the high cost of health care. However, technology has proved essential to driving down costs in industry after industry. By diagnosing health problems earlier and enabling patients to manage medical conditions at home, disposable wireless sensors and smartphones will help produce better outcomes at lower cost. It’s a bit like having a doctor in your pocket.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

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Mobile Clinic delivers pediatric care to medical provider shortage areas with telemedicine

Mobile Clinic delivers pediatric care to medical provider shortage areas with telemedicine | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Telemedicine Technology gives providers flexibility and mobility when delivering care, which creates new opportunities to reach neighborhoods and patients that may otherwise lack sufficient access to adequate healthcare.

 

Some communities in the U.S.struggle with food security and other basic necessities, which makes prioritizing healthcare difficult for public officials. Likewise, there may simply not be proper infrastructure or facilities available to deliver high-quality treatment in extremely impoverished or remote areas of the country. Other factors, like natural disasters, for example, could complicate or inhibit treatment. 

 

In Miami-Dade County, The University of Miami Pediatric Mobile Clinic relies on AMD's telemedicine technology to help them greatly improve access to treatment in areas that need it most.

Here are just a few of the challenges that the University of Miami set out to solve:

 

  • Provide primary care services to over 3,000 uninsured pediatric patients each year
  • Increase patient compliance rate for follow-up appointments, care plans and healthy lifestyles
  • Address additional medical needs beyond primary care services including education and support.

The UMPMC was indeed able to bring treatment to individuals and families that otherwise were not getting adequate healthcare. Here are just a few of the results:

 

  • Provided 2,000 clinical encounters and 3,000 immunizations administered
  • Removed the barriers for follow-up appointments,
  • Offered quick on-the-spot access to remote specialists

By bringing patients in contact with specialists and other clinical professionals, the UMPMC achieved a 90 percent patient compliance rate in follow-up appointments, up from just 30 percent prior to this initiative.

 

Humble origins


In 1992, the University of Miami had a unique and powerful response to the immense challenge of reaching individuals and families that had been displaced by Hurricane Andrew. In response, the Pediatric Mobile Clinic was born. Ever since, the UMPMC has been able to offer immunizations and physicals as well as urgent care or mental health support to the uninsured and disenfranchised.

 

The idea of a mobile health center was no unique to the University of Miami. In the late 1980's, Dr. Irwin Redlener and singer/songwriter Paul Simon founded the New York Children's Health Project, an effort to treat the homeless and needy. Through a donation from Simon, a mobile medical unit was used to provide pediatric care to those who otherwise could not access adequate healthcare.

 

The perfect partnership


With the help of AMD's Portable TeleClinic, UMPMC is able to treat nearly 3,000 children each year. The telemedicine system allows the mobile clinic's healthcare staff to consult with necessary physicians and medical specialists. The mobile care center a converted bus that has the clinical capacity of a traditional doctor's office can be brought directly to neighborhoods or communities where care is needed most. Anything from primary care services and chronic disease management to dermatology and cardiac care is provided through the UMPMC.

 

Pediatrician Lisa Gwynn, the director of the Pediatric Mobile Clinic and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, highlights why this program is so valuable.

 

"Our uninsured patients were faced with too many barriers to get to their specialist appointments because it meant they needed to travel long distances and would incur additional costs, so most of them were simply not showing up," she said. "By bringing the remote specialists to our mobile unit via AMD's telemedicine technology, we brought our compliance rate up significantly from 30 to 90 percent, and more importantly our patients are benefiting from all-inclusive care."

 

The UMPMC is using the Portable TeleClinic system as a fully functional exam station By leveraging specialty medical devices, real-time data aggregation software and video conferencing not only can doctors reach new patients, but they are provided with the resources to improve outcomes. In the year 2014, the UMPMC completed 2,000 clinical encounters, which included nearly 200 mental health visits and administered 3,000 immunizations.

For the staff working in the mobile clinic, these telemedicine tools make it possible to work with medical professionals throughout the University of Miami and beyond. Consultation or a second opinion can be accessed with video conferencing. Likewise, examination cameras, electronic stethoscopes and a 12-lead ECG are integrated in a way that allows for sharing patient data and live medical video, all in real-time.

 

"Working with such an established telemedicine partner such as AMD Global Telemedicine, and leveraging their technology has allowed us to have many of the same cutting-edge services as a traditional hospital or medical practice. Through telemedicine, the UMPMC staff can easily and effectively communicate with colleagues and peers as needed," said Dr. Gwynn.

 

Essential services


The UMPMC offers care to uninsured patients, and according to Dr. Gwynn, many of these individuals have never been examined by a doctor. For that reason, not only are general check-ups essential, but access to specialty care is also a critical component of their telemedicine program.

 

Leveraging AMD's Portable TeleClinic and the integrated telemedicine technology has helped UMPMC extend beyond the reach of primary care to 15 specialty services offered today, including: dermatology, cardiology, endocrinology, nutrition, hematology. school physicals, management of chronic/acute illnesses, prescriptions, and many more.

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