IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Making your clinic & staff more efficient

Making your clinic & staff more efficient | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Data collection on staff activity allows managers and leaders to determine how their team is spending their time and which activities take up the most of their working day. This post will help make your clinic and staff more efficient.

 

Data collection tools give you a clear picture of how your staff spends their time at work and how they can become more productive.

 

This is important in health businesses, as you are able to determine where your front desk and administration staff are spending their time.

 

I will use one of our clients as an example, they have two clinics and the managers found that there was always a workload on the weekend staff for scanning and administration. The staff that worked during the week were never able to complete the scanning, filing and other administrative tasks during their working day, resulting in a backlog of weekend staff.

 

By using the activity tracking software, they found out that the weekday staff was spending all of their time on the clinical software booking appointments and taking calls. This confirmed that the workload during the week was too much for the staff and allowed the client to justify hiring a new front desk staff member to complete the scanning and filing during the week.

 

You can use the data to:

  • Challenge your staff to spend an hour less a day on emails and use this hour to work on a project
  • Determine the average time staff spend on social media whilst they are in the office and raise alarms if, for example, a staff member has spent more than two hours on Facebook
  • Set yourself some goals, for example, spend less time on administration and more time using the clinical software.

 

A product that we use and is RescueTime. It is installed on all the devices in the workplace and it gives both staff and management a report of their efficiency, productivity, and areas of concern.

 

We use this software to determine processes in our workflow that need to improve and find out how productive we are compared to other staff members.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Tablet Computers For Healthcare Professionals

Tablet Computers For Healthcare Professionals | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Considering where I work and what I do, my clinical colleagues often ask me for advice when they are shopping for a new computer. Most doctors and nurses are going to be happiest with some kind of mobile solution.

 

After all, doctors, nurses and other clinicians are always on the move. A desktop just doesn’t cut it for most of us who work in healthcare.

 

Tablet computers and convertible devices that can function as tablets, laptops and (when docked) even desktops, are becoming increasingly popular in clinical settings.

 

But all such devices aren’t created equal, especially when you consider the privacy, security and connectivity needs of enterprise healthcare environments. That’s something that has become all too clear for clinicians who in recent years have purchased one of the most popular consumer tablet devices on the market and brought it into work, only to find that it just didn’t deliver what’s needed in that setting.

 

Fortunately, there are now many good choices in tablet devices that will measure up when used in clinical settings. They are available from a  wide variety of manufacturers and come in screen sizes and at price points that are a good match for clinical use.

 

For starters, we’ve come up with some key criteria to help define what we believe works best in healthcare and what you should consider before buying a new device. These are also considerations that IT professionals must consider when purchasing devices to deploy in clinical settings. I like to call this “clinical grade”. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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Every internet-connected device is a potential privacy risk

Every internet-connected device is a potential privacy risk | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Samsung has caused controversy with the revelation its voice-recognition system enables internet TVs to collect sounds and send them to a third party, including any sensitive information you might happen to talk about in front of the box.

While this warning is alarming for the privacy-conscious, it's a microcosm of a much larger threat that many in the consumer security business have been warning against  and which you can expect to hear more often.

Devices that require personal input and the collection of personal data to function — be it via voice, camera, location or otherwise — have been a part of our lives for years, and are only increasing.

Here is a list of some of the household and personal items snooping on you:

Smartphones

A small box that can collect location data, detect motion, store audio and video plus keeps track of your online activities, your phone provides a way for most of your apps and services to "listen in" on you in one way or another, not to mention a microphone which researchers have manipulated to spy .


You can easily control when a Samsung Smart will and will not collect voice data, the company says.

Apple's Siri, for example, functions almost identically to Samsung's voice recognition.

These services rely on a dedicated voice-recognition service somewhere in the cloud to take your complex requests and queries, translate them into understandable text, and send them back to your phone or TV.

While they may not be actively listening 24 hours a day, at the very least they are monitoring the microphone's feed in expectation of a command.

Video game consoles

Microsoft's Xbox One and its attached Kinect sensor works the same way, but adds video to the mix as well. Kinect keeps track of the people in a room so it can detect who's present and load their preferences accordingly, or zoom and pan the camera to make sure everybody is in frame during a Skype call.

Microsoft faced backlash in 2013 for its zealous attitude toward collecting data from Kinect (which eventually forced it to dial back its plans) and, coincidentally in the same year, LG landed in some strife for a voice-activated TV that was found to send voice recordings online.


The Smarter Wi-Fi Coffee Machine. It knows when you wake up or when you're likely to get home so it can greet you with sweet caffeine. Photo: Smarter

Coffee machines and airconditioners

A device that "listens" before using the internet to provide us with a service is not a new idea. The trigger for controversy, it seems, is the revelation that a device could do that without us explicitly telling it to. Yet this is the cornerstone of many devices and services we use every day (including web browsers, social media, smart public transport cards, Google Now etc) and will continue to be so as we move towards the all-connected "internet of things". 

A connected coffee-maker, for example, collates data about when you're home so it knows when to make coffee. Ditto for connected airconditioners. Both devices are soon to be (or already are) on the market, and necessarily "listen in" on your life and activities, collecting data on you so they can do their job. LG already has an voice-command airconditioner that literally "listens in", cooling the room if you yell out that it's too hot.


Your phone provides data on your movements, purchases, preferences, searches, and communications to countless apps and services. Photo: Reuters

Is this form of data collection really so scary considering the reams of information we already gladly hand over to the companies that provide our email, maps or ride-share services? Are we really concerned about Samsung's microphones in our house and fine with the microphone, GPS and camera we take around in our pocket literally every day?

A common piece of advice when it comes to the internet is "if you don't want the whole world to hear about it, don't say it online". Increasingly, we not only have to apply this test to emails and facebook messages but to the data we allow our appliances and devices to collect as well. If it's connected to the internet, assume this data is being transmitted online.

Some privacy-minded folks advocate active avoidance, keeping the use of these devices to a minimum, disabling settings or placing a piece of sticky tape over your device's data-collecting apparatus.

Others take pride in their old-school Nokia phones, dumb TVs and ability to "stay off the grid".

But most of us give up information about ourselves constantly because it gives us access to incredible conveniences and technology, and we can't have our cake and eat it too.

Yes, companies like Samsung and Apple and Microsoft must be transparent about what they do with our data, and to whom they give it. But if the last year or so of data breaches, wide-scale hacks and government snooping has taught us anything, it's that no data stored or transmitted online is safe from prying eyes.

In the end we have no absolute control over where our data goes.

The best we can do is be informed about what data our devices are collecting, and if you really don't want something transmitted online, take Samsung's advice and don't say it where an internet-connected TV can hear you.



Via Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry, Gust MEES, Oksana Borukh, Paulo Félix
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A Wireless Doctor In Your Pocket 

A Wireless Doctor In Your Pocket  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

A combination of disposable wireless sensors and smartphones is about to make health care more personal, immediate, and affordable. New solutions are emerging that harvest real-time health data and respond with on-the-spot warnings or suggestions. This technology will not only produce better outcomes, it will help extend the benefits of modern health care to people in developing countries and keep consumers everywhere better informed about the latest health products and practices.

The disposable wireless sensors being developed and commercialized by Gentag, Inc. are a good example. The sensors are intended for use by consumers and come packaged as either skin patches or specimen dipsticks. Gentag believes there is a huge global market for sensors that can be mass-produced, are easy to use, and work with popular smartphones and tablet computers.

Unlike telemedicine, which was conceived to conquer distance, Gentag’s technology is mainly about immediacy. Consumers can use skin patches and dipsticks at their convenience in their homes and workplaces. Smartphone apps provide instant feedback and can automatically forward results to caregivers. Problems can be spotted in their earliest, most treatable stages and therapy can begin at once.

Disposable sensors offer significant savings over traditional solutions. Most of the sensor designs lend themselves to high-volume mass production. They work with smartphones that consumers already have or are expected to have in the near future. And disposable wireless sensors avoid the costs associated with traveling to and using outpatient labs.

Gentag’s skin patch sensors typically consist of printable chemical strips and near field communications (NFC) chips. The chemical strips can test and measure parameters such as body temperature, skin moisture, and (with the aid of microneedles) blood glucose. NFC makes collecting the results as simple as a waving a mobile phone over the skin patch. (NFC sensors don’t require batteries because the phone provides the power.) Using NFC to read a sensor also helps avoid human error. Dipstick sensors can test specimens such as urine for pregnancy, prostate cancer, and other conditions.

The disposable wireless sensor-smartphone combination can be used to manage serious medical conditions. A smartphone app for managing diabetes can collect blood glucose readings from a skin patch containing microneedles and send commands to an implanted insulin pump. The app can determine when insulin is needed and whether a delivered dose was sufficient. The app can also take into account time of day, food consumed, and the patient’s past responses. Gentag hopes that skin patches with microneedles will free children with Type 1 diabetes from having to stick themselves several times per day.

Gentag’s dipstick sensor technology can detect very specific medical conditions. Monoclonal antibodies are used to produce biomarkers for particular pathogens, allergens, cancers, and drug toxicity. There are potentially thousands of biomarkers that can be detected. The urine test for prostate cancer mentioned above uses biomarkers.

Disposable wireless sensors offer additional benefits to makers of consumer health products. Manufacturers can deliver increased value by bundling disposable wireless sensors that help customers use their products more effectively and efficiently. When customers download the free apps that are required to use the disposable sensors, they identify themselves and establish direct communications with the manufacturers.

This is a big deal, because until now non-prescription consumer health products were nearly always purchased anonymously. Free smartphone apps can be used to gather demographic data, to gauge customer satisfaction, and to learn more about how customers use specific products. The apps can also be used to deliver electronic coupons, new product announcements, and health tips. Most manufacturers are likely to conclude that it’s worth the cost of giving away disposable sensors and smartphone apps to learn about and communicate directly with their end users.

There is another intriguing potential benefit of disposable wireless sensors. Modern medicine is highly information-driven, but most physiological data is collected when patients visit a doctor or emergency room. With Gentag’s technology, data can be gathered from people as they go about their daily activities. Large scale tracking of physiological data could help health care providers detect epidemics earlier and more accurately identify the warning signs for specific medical problems. Disposable wireless sensors and smartphones should also make clinical trials easier for both participants and researchers.

Technology is often blamed for the high cost of health care. However, technology has proved essential to driving down costs in industry after industry. By diagnosing health problems earlier and enabling patients to manage medical conditions at home, disposable wireless sensors and smartphones will help produce better outcomes at lower cost. It’s a bit like having a doctor in your pocket.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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Mobile Clinic delivers pediatric care to medical provider shortage areas with telemedicine

Mobile Clinic delivers pediatric care to medical provider shortage areas with telemedicine | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Telemedicine Technology gives providers flexibility and mobility when delivering care, which creates new opportunities to reach neighborhoods and patients that may otherwise lack sufficient access to adequate healthcare.

 

Some communities in the U.S.struggle with food security and other basic necessities, which makes prioritizing healthcare difficult for public officials. Likewise, there may simply not be proper infrastructure or facilities available to deliver high-quality treatment in extremely impoverished or remote areas of the country. Other factors, like natural disasters, for example, could complicate or inhibit treatment. 

 

In Miami-Dade County, The University of Miami Pediatric Mobile Clinic relies on AMD's telemedicine technology to help them greatly improve access to treatment in areas that need it most.

Here are just a few of the challenges that the University of Miami set out to solve:

 

  • Provide primary care services to over 3,000 uninsured pediatric patients each year
  • Increase patient compliance rate for follow-up appointments, care plans and healthy lifestyles
  • Address additional medical needs beyond primary care services including education and support.

The UMPMC was indeed able to bring treatment to individuals and families that otherwise were not getting adequate healthcare. Here are just a few of the results:

 

  • Provided 2,000 clinical encounters and 3,000 immunizations administered
  • Removed the barriers for follow-up appointments,
  • Offered quick on-the-spot access to remote specialists

By bringing patients in contact with specialists and other clinical professionals, the UMPMC achieved a 90 percent patient compliance rate in follow-up appointments, up from just 30 percent prior to this initiative.

 

Humble origins


In 1992, the University of Miami had a unique and powerful response to the immense challenge of reaching individuals and families that had been displaced by Hurricane Andrew. In response, the Pediatric Mobile Clinic was born. Ever since, the UMPMC has been able to offer immunizations and physicals as well as urgent care or mental health support to the uninsured and disenfranchised.

 

The idea of a mobile health center was no unique to the University of Miami. In the late 1980's, Dr. Irwin Redlener and singer/songwriter Paul Simon founded the New York Children's Health Project, an effort to treat the homeless and needy. Through a donation from Simon, a mobile medical unit was used to provide pediatric care to those who otherwise could not access adequate healthcare.

 

The perfect partnership


With the help of AMD's Portable TeleClinic, UMPMC is able to treat nearly 3,000 children each year. The telemedicine system allows the mobile clinic's healthcare staff to consult with necessary physicians and medical specialists. The mobile care center a converted bus that has the clinical capacity of a traditional doctor's office can be brought directly to neighborhoods or communities where care is needed most. Anything from primary care services and chronic disease management to dermatology and cardiac care is provided through the UMPMC.

 

Pediatrician Lisa Gwynn, the director of the Pediatric Mobile Clinic and associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, highlights why this program is so valuable.

 

"Our uninsured patients were faced with too many barriers to get to their specialist appointments because it meant they needed to travel long distances and would incur additional costs, so most of them were simply not showing up," she said. "By bringing the remote specialists to our mobile unit via AMD's telemedicine technology, we brought our compliance rate up significantly from 30 to 90 percent, and more importantly our patients are benefiting from all-inclusive care."

 

The UMPMC is using the Portable TeleClinic system as a fully functional exam station By leveraging specialty medical devices, real-time data aggregation software and video conferencing not only can doctors reach new patients, but they are provided with the resources to improve outcomes. In the year 2014, the UMPMC completed 2,000 clinical encounters, which included nearly 200 mental health visits and administered 3,000 immunizations.

For the staff working in the mobile clinic, these telemedicine tools make it possible to work with medical professionals throughout the University of Miami and beyond. Consultation or a second opinion can be accessed with video conferencing. Likewise, examination cameras, electronic stethoscopes and a 12-lead ECG are integrated in a way that allows for sharing patient data and live medical video, all in real-time.

 

"Working with such an established telemedicine partner such as AMD Global Telemedicine, and leveraging their technology has allowed us to have many of the same cutting-edge services as a traditional hospital or medical practice. Through telemedicine, the UMPMC staff can easily and effectively communicate with colleagues and peers as needed," said Dr. Gwynn.

 

Essential services


The UMPMC offers care to uninsured patients, and according to Dr. Gwynn, many of these individuals have never been examined by a doctor. For that reason, not only are general check-ups essential, but access to specialty care is also a critical component of their telemedicine program.

 

Leveraging AMD's Portable TeleClinic and the integrated telemedicine technology has helped UMPMC extend beyond the reach of primary care to 15 specialty services offered today, including: dermatology, cardiology, endocrinology, nutrition, hematology. school physicals, management of chronic/acute illnesses, prescriptions, and many more.

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