IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Is Cloud Storage Right For Your Business? 

Is Cloud Storage Right For Your Business?  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Is Cloud Storage Right For Your Business? Some Pros and Cons to Consider

 

Due to the rising bandwidth requirements and shift toward wireless systems, the enterprise network equipment market is projected to hit $30.6 billion by 2020. Cloud equipment is becoming an increasingly popular investment for many small and mid-sized companies. Before you determine whether or not cloud equipment is the right investment for your business, it’s important to know the facts. Here are just a few basic pros and cons of cloud storage options.

PRO: Accessibility

First, cloud storage comes in many different platforms, one popular option being Meraki equipment. Professional Meraki support is also available to ensure adequate storage and data protection. Furthermore, cloud storage offers optimal accessibility — users can seamlessly view and upload data from anywhere with an Internet connection. This also means that time zones won’t be an issue.

CON: Potential Privacy Risks

Redundant data centers provide almost complete (99.99%) reliability, including local network functions still working if the Meraki dashboard went down. While the majority of cloud providers offer nothing but virtually 100% reliable service, there are some providers that may take improper measures and leave your data vulnerable. Our Meraki specialists offer expert Meraki support, ensuring your data is as protected as possible at all times, so this should never be an issue with our services.

PRO: Reduced Operating Costs

About 82% of companies surveyed said that they saved money by moving to the cloud, and it’s likely that yours will too. This is a direct result of the nature of cloud technology.

“Cloud storage for your business will come at little or no cost for a small or medium-sized organization. This will reduce your annual operating costs and even more savings because it does not depend on internal power to store information remotely,” writes Amy Pritchett on CompareTheCloud.

CON: Potential for Complexity

Finally, it may be challenging to get all employees properly trained on new cloud services and technology for your business. But with some time, anyone can learn and use it effectively.

When all is said and done, 80% of cloud adopters saw improvements within six months of moving to the cloud. Being able to weigh the pros and cons of this innovative technology can help you make the best decisions for your business.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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6 Reasons Why NOT Having Your Server In-house is a Good Idea

6 Reasons Why NOT Having Your Server In-house is a Good Idea | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Benefits of having cloud based laboratory information system.

The myths surrounding data storage on Cloud are many. Most of us have preconceived notions regarding data safety and security, data vulnerability, storage, data retrieval& transfer, etc. However, what we fail to remember is that data storage on Cloud is extremely reliable and robust with most banks and financial institutions using it seamlessly. Therefore, it is about time that the healthcare fraternity embraces Cloud wholeheartedly to explore and take complete advantage of this cutting edge technology solution.

 

Today, we take a peek into the most evident advantages of having your Laboratory Information System on Cloud and what makes it one of the smartest business choices you will ever make:

1. No Hassle in data Accessibility

In this age of evidence-based medicine, data accessibility is of paramount importance as far as effective patient care is concerned. Cloud-based LIS makes data accessibility much easier as compared to the LIS, which is located in on-site servers. Since the data is stored on the Cloud, information from multiple centers can be accessed from anywhere, anytime. Cloud-based LIS makes it easy for data to be accessed from any location or any device through secure logins thereby speeding up the whole process of pathological deductions and decisions leading to faster report turn around.

2. Your Data Remains Ultra Safe

One of the major concerns in a laboratory information system is the security of the patient data that is generated on a daily basis and stored on the servers. Cloud-based LIS takes care of this perfectly. The data in the Cloud-based LIS is stored in encrypted form that has high security levels and cannot be accessed in usable form by anyone other than authorized personnel with access rights. With practically no server downtime as compared to the on-site servers, Cloud-based LIS relieves the user of any operational problems and data security issues that result from server downtime.

3. Reduced IT Requirements

A Cloud-based LIS means that the servers are off-site and all the costs associated with the hardware installation and the associated maintenance is nullified. The easy accessibility associated with Cloud based LIS also makes it simple to add users, centers, sections, services etc. to the master log. This means you don’t have to go hunting for the in-house IT team; and anyone who has the login with administrator rights can do it easily. You effectively save additional manpower cost spent on maintaining a big IT team to maintain the server, add/ edit the master logs and related activities.

4. Staggered Investments

Cloud-based LIS gives the laboratory owner the option of not buying a large server at the onset and thereby blocking up money. It takes away the risk of projecting the growth of the lab correctly and buying a server that will be able to scale and handle the data and operations load of that projected growth. Cloud-based LIS means the server space can be hired as and when the growth happens. There is no prior commitment and no blocked investment. Investment on server space only needs to happen when the need arises and that too, only as an added amount in the form of simple monthly utility fees.

5. Cost Effective

The most obvious reason why Cloud-based Laboratory Information System is a smart business choice is due to its cost effectiveness. As the servers are off-site, it requires no hardware installation and the resultant licensing fees, maintenance costs and the software updates that will keep happening life-long for the software can be cut out immediately. There is no cost of hardware either and only monthly utility fees is what you need to pay.

6. Practically Zero Maintenance

With no server within your premises you don’t need to worry about the safety of the server room, temperature maintenance, pest control, server downtime, software updates and other such factors. Fixed amounts as monthly utility fee will take care of all this for you.

Having a Cloud based LIS can smoothen your operations to a large extent. It makes automation a cost effective option and also leaves you with more time to focus on the core operations, and taking care of your patients.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Healthcare Cloud Security And Data Protection 

Healthcare Cloud Security And Data Protection  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

a report from Gemalto indicated that it is no surprise that security breaches are frequently happening in the healthcare industry. Their Data Breach info-graphic shows out of the total data breaches 34% was reported in healthcare while 31% government files were breached, followed by 15% breaches taking place in technology firm records. What is the reason for the healthcare industry being the main target? The answer partially is money. A report from Security Week notes that hackers and thieves make $363 on an average per medical file. Here is why physician practices, medical providers and enterprises should use cloud based security to ensure safety of patient data.

 

1. Low Cost – Cloud based data storage offers more security and it is less expensive than trying to protect data in your office with motion activated cameras and armed security guards.

 

2. More Protection – Cloud based companies work in association with global web security firms to give multiple layer of protection to your data.

 

3. Greater Vigilance – Cloud based security offers immediate and continuous threat detection which works round the clock. This is not an option seen in most medical practices because they have to employ staff and resources to ensure 24/7 security.

While opting for cloud based security, vendors give healthcare providers the best security measures available in the industry without any initial investment. It is better used cloud based security resources while giving patient care to avoid data breach.

 

 
 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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Design Of A Mobile Health Clinic

Design Of A Mobile Health Clinic | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

A mobile clinic allows the health provider or health business to deliver its services from multiple locations. Simply put, you go to the patient, they don’t come to you.


The concept of mobile and virtual health clinics has grown rapidly and both are now key business models for health businesses in Australia.

 

Mobile health clinics have certainly grown in both numbers and services offered, as you now have clinicians and health practitioners flying into towns to hold a clinic or even doing a roadshow-like journey through rural and remote areas.

 

Mobile health clinics are also increasing in metropolitan areas where health practitioners or health businesses are going into the corporate, government and educational sectors to offer their services to the staff of those organizations.

 

Simply put, doctors, allied health professionals, and community workers are now becoming more mobile and as such, are having a bigger reach.

 

Most health practitioners agree that the biggest challenge in a mobile health clinic is to be mobile. In order words, the ability to access all the necessary clinical and business tools and offer the same service as an in-house health clinic is the greatest challenge.

Below are some tips on how to design a mobile health clinic (from an IT perspective).

 

Know what tools you need to complete your tasks in a mobile environment, this includes:

  • The clinical software applications you currently use (MD, BP, Genie, Pathology)
  • The billing applications you currently use (BP Management, eClaims)
  • The communication/messaging applications you currently use (Argus, Healthlink)
  • The administrative tools you currently use (Outlook, calendar)

Ask your current eHealth IT consultant to perform some research on

  • Cloud solutions specific to the health industry
  • Remote desktop solutions
  • Remote access solutions

 

At REND Tech, our Cloud for Health solution allows mobile, virtual and FIFO businesses to access their complete clinical IT environment from anywhere (home, office, mobile office), at any time and using their preferred device (iPads, tablets, laptops).

Before agreeing on a solution/vendor, ensure that

  • You have thoroughly tested the solution and it meets your requirements
  • Your data and applications are hosted in Australia
  • Your data, applications and complete IT environment are backed up daily
  • You are happy with the security levels provided
  • There is ongoing IT support and maintenance to ensure that your solution is always available.
  • You have tested the solution using wireless, networked and 3G/4G connections

 

By following the steps above, you should be well and truly on your way to having an excellent IT foundation for your mobile health clinic.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Breathe new life into your old PC

Breathe new life into your old PC | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Don’t be so quick to dump that old computer! Despite being slow, clunky, and prone to crashes, your old desktop or laptop might just be perfectly usable — after a few light upgrades that will breathe new life into it and enable you to use it for other computing needs.

 

As mentioned, you have to make a few upgrades on your old PC. You may want to try a lighter OS, for example. Keep in mind that the latest version of Windows or MacOS won’t work optimally without a fast processor, so a Linux-based OS, which comes in a variety of options called “distros,” would be a better option. It will make your computer feel brand new without exhausting its hardware.

 

Popular distros options such as Ubuntu, elementary OS, and PinguyOS can be easily installed. Plus, they have similar interfaces to Windows and come with a boatload of software packages. The best part is they require a minimum of 4GB of RAM, so you won’t have to invest much at all.

 

Once you’ve upgraded your old PC, you can start using it as a NAS server, a dedicated privacy computer, or a digital media hosting platform.

Make a NAS server

Network-attached storage (NAS) is a server for your home or small business network that lets you store files that need to be shared with all the computers on the network. If your old PC has at least 8GB of RAM, you can use it as your own NAS.

 

Simply download FreeNAS, a software accessible on Windows, MacOS, or Linux, that enables you to create a shared backup of your computers. FreeNAS has access permissions and allows you to stream media to a mobile OS, like iOS and Android.

 

But if you’d rather convert your PC into a private cloud for remote access and data backup, Tonido is a great alternative. Compatible with Mac, Windows, and Linux, this free private cloud server turns your computer into a storage website, letting you access files from anywhere on any device.

 

Tonido offers up to 2GB of file syncing across computers, and there are even Tonido apps for iOS and Android.

Secure your online privacy

Install The Amnesic Incognito Live System (TAILS) on your old computer and enjoy your very own dedicated privacy PC.

TAILS routes all your internet traffic and requests through TOR Project, a software that makes it difficult for anyone to track you online. All of this Linux-based software’s integrated applications like a web browser, Office suite, and email software are pre-configured for robust security and privacy protection.

Kick your media up a notch

Looking for a way to listen to music and podcasts or watch videos on other PCs or mobile devices? Server software like Kodi can help.

 

Kodi brings all your digital media together into one user-friendly package so you can use your old PC as an audio and video hosting platform. From there, you can play files on other devices via the internet. There are remote control apps for both iOS and Android, and even an app for Kodi playback on Amazon Fire TV.

 

Kodi works on any Windows, MacOS, and Linux computer, and even on even rooted Android and jailbroken iOS devices.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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How To Reduce Healthcare Consumers' Anger ?

How To Reduce Healthcare Consumers' Anger ? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

However, I am not angry at my doctor, my insurance company, the government, or with "the computer." I'm exasperated with the so-called professionals who installed the computer system in my doctor's office. Unfortunately, the incident I'm about to describe isn't one-off.

 

American healthcare's reliance on information technology is an unprecedented and relatively recent change. To make sure that this change is not only "meaningful" but transformative, means it must be done right. Sometimes, more often than necessary, it isn't. Healthcare IT professionals are frequently at fault, and I'd like to recommend how we can do better.

 

A few weeks ago, I called my physician's office and requested that it send a drug refill to my mail order pharmacy, because I would run out before my next office visit. Soon the office called to say that my doctor had sent the order. Great! I would have my prescription in a couple of weeks. Worry free, I could continue my road warrior job traveling to hospitals to help them make sense of the rapidly changing health IT environment. Or so I thought.

By the day before Thanksgiving, I still had no drugs. I was about to run out.

 

I went to my pharmacy's web site and learned -- ouch! -- that it had never received a prescription. Of course, I could not contact my doctor because of the holiday, not even by the following Monday; the staff had been given an extra day off to enjoy their leftover turkey.

 

"Worry free" time was over. On Tuesday, the office receptionist instantly discovered the issue. "Oh! I see what happened. We just changed computer systems and some people's pharmacies didn't get converted right. Your prescription went to the wrong mail order pharmacy." After various back-and-forths, guess what else she uncovered? The new system had reverted me to a three year old address.

 

Now I was angry and still am. This isn't personal. Of course, I "fixed" the immediate problem, forking over an extra $25 co-pay after a few days of heightened cholesterol. No, my anger is about professionalism, or lack thereof, in my chosen field – healthcare IT.

 

As an IT professional, I KNOW this should never have happened. The fault is not with the physician's office, the mail order pharmacy, nor even with the physician's parent health system -- because converting all their physicians to an EHR platform shared with the hospital was a very good idea. No, my finger is pointing at the implementation project manager for a software vendor that I won't name, and a project manager at a consulting firm that I can't name either. One or more of these people bungled their jobs in at least one of these ways:

 

  • Deciding to convert data from the old system to the new system and not doing it right.
  • Neglecting to review the results of the conversion before loading it into the new system.
  • Not having a valid testing/quality methodology to catch the mix-up, or more likely just not making sure it was properly applied.
  • Deciding to go live before the time was right. The project manager perhaps didn't know this, and so failed at his/her job. Worse, perhaps he knew of the conversion issues and didn't have the backbone to call them out and fix them before a go-live that would potentially put patients' health at risk.

IT vendors and consultants must be trusted partners in hospitals' solutions, not perpetrators of needless mistakes and risk. This is healthcare, not Macy's. When we get IT wrong, people can die!

Over my 20+ year career, I've seen a lot happen in healthcare IT. Most of it has been good, but some of it was scary, like the folly described above. When it's scary, it's usually also needlessly expensive. Those expenses eventually roll back to consumers. Hmmm…aren't ever-increasing costs a central element to consumers' anger with our healthcare system? Aside from their frequent frustration with scenarios such as my Thanksgiving experience?

 

Healthcare IT professionals can do better and should. Those who are passionate about their work care whether prescriptions get filled, diagnoses are correctly recorded, and the right healthcare is delivered. They do not see themselves as technicians, but as accountable care-delivery partners with physicians and clinicians. But many consultants and project managers don't go that additional mile or two of accountability -- one that should never be considered "extra." Let me share some principles I've learned that everyone in healthcare IT can benefit from if they really want to contribute to better US healthcare.

 

1. In healthcare IT, be careful with the Pareto principle. There's not a project I've been on where design decisions about how to get an 80% bang for our 20% buck weren't considered. This happens, especially in workflow design, where the healthcare environment is so complex you just can't get to the 100% level.   But you cannot take the same shortcuts with data. If the healthcare data isn't right, bad things happen:

 

  • Physicians rely on inaccurate (and missing) data to make clinical decisions that can injure or kill. There are many reasons for morbidity and mortality in healthcare. Information technology shouldn't be one of them.
  • Incorrect bills that exasperate patients and payers get submitted, which take time and money to fix. If too many of those bad bills get to CMS, it won't be heaven that breaks loose.
  • Items get missed. For example, charges go AWOL, causing the hospital not to be reimbursed. CFOs want to know why their revenue has dropped…CEOs and Boards want to know a lot more.

2. Eliminate unwarranted data conversion costs. Hospitals often spend ten to 100 times what it would have cost to get it right the first time. I'm working with a hospital now that experienced a flawed patient records conversion from their previous billing system. This blunder has required the hospital to maintain their previous billing platform for six years, just to have a place to look up that data. They've paid hardware and software costs, spent immeasurable IT hours just keeping the old platform running, and wasted easily as many billing hours sorting out master patient index issues. Maintenance of this legacy mess is not sustainable. Doing the right thing now – switching to a new platform and converting exactly no patient data is going to be painful, especially when reregistering patients for the first time. The hospital is wisely making this move, after immense unnecessary spending.

 

3. Watch for what you can't see. It's as important as what you can, but a lot harder to verify. It's much easier to find a duplicate charge -- even the payers will be nice enough to point these out – than a missing charge. Once you find the latter, you have to go looking for others like it, and you're likely to discover far more than you feared. A while back, during a random quality audit, my team discovered one account that appeared to be incorrectly adjusted. While the account was in the right queue to be worked, no one had noticed the problem because the payer's incorrect adjustment put the account at zero balance. Because work queries were set to ignore $0 balance accounts, this issue would not have been found were it not for the random audit.

 

4. Outliers are the most critical data. That account I mentioned previously? Once we looked further, we found almost 7,000 accounts over two years that had the same issue. We could have fixed about 90% of them with a query. It was the 10% outliers that hurt. The billing team had to touch all of the affected accounts to correct the write-offs, and refund several hundred patients who were mistakenly billed a balance after the primary payer's error rolled to the secondary payer. Assumptions that all the cases fit a certain pattern lead to dangerous shortcuts.

 

5. It doesn't matter how good your systems are if your processes are poor. I can't count the times I've been called to fix a system issue that actually was a data issue, and that the precipitating problem was the process set up to maintain the data needed by the system. Some examples:

  • Security issues where employees who were terminated had their accounts removed, but physician accounts were left active, because physicians weren't "employees."
  • Hours spent researching why something isn't working, only to learn that the test and production systems (their lookup data) were different, because no one was maintaining the test system.
  • Issues where a queue of missed charges piled up (unseen, of course) because apharmacy interface required a perfect match between the pharmacy system and the charge master, and no one was working the interface rejects list.

6. Finally, it's just as important to push for no-live as for go-live. No question, this is a difficult scenario. You're putting in a new system. You've worked nights and weekends and equally pushed your team in order to make the go-live date. Now, you have to walk into a formal go/no-go decision meeting, complete with all the hospital's executives champing at the bit. As the project manager, you are responsible for making sure that the no-go option really is an option. Remember my previous points: bad data = big costs, and in healthcare if we don't get it right, people can die. Letting a system go live before it's ready is as close to malpractice as letting a patient go home who isn't ready. I've made the no-go decision twice. I even lost my job one of those times. No one died, and the company is still in business. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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