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OpenDNS trials system that quickly detects computer crime

OpenDNS trials system that quickly detects computer crime | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

A security system undergoing testing by a San-Francisco-based company aims to speed up the detection of websites and domains used for cybercrime.

The technology is being developed by OpenDNS, which specializes in performing DNS (Domain Name System) lookups. The DNS translates domain names such as idg.com into an IP address that can be called into a browser

OpenDNS offers a secure DNS service for ISPs and organizations that blocks requests from Web browsers to sites that may be associated with cybercrime or spoof a company such as PayPal.

The company, which was founded in 2005, has grown so much that its systems respond to some 71 billion DNS requests per day. That’s just 2 percent of global DNS traffic but is enough of a sample to pick up on many cybercrime campaigns.

The new system, called Natural Language Processing rank (NLPRank) looks at a range of metrics around a particular domain name or website to figure out if it’s suspicious.

It scores a domain name to figure out if it’s likely fraudulent by comparing it to a corpus of suspicious names or phrases. For example, g00gle.com—with zeros substituting for the letter “o”—would raise a red flag.

Many cybercriminal groups have surprisingly predictable patterns when registering domains names for their campaigns, a type of malicious vernacular that OpenDNS is indexing. Bogus domain names use company names, or phrases like “Java update,” “billinginfo” or “security-info” to try to appear legitimate.

But there’s a chance that NLPRank could trigger a false positive, flagging a variation of a domain that is legitimate, said Andrew Hay, director of security research at OpenDNS.

To prevent false positives, the system also checks to see if a particular domain is running on the same network, known as its ASN (autonomous system number), that the company or organization usually uses. NLPRank also looks at the HTML composition of a new domain. If it differs from that of the real organization, it can be a sign of fraud.

NLPRank is still being refined to make sure the false positive rate is as low as possible. But there have been encouraging signs that the system has already spotted malware campaigns seen by other security companies, Hay said.

Earlier this month, Kaspersky Lab released a report on a gang that stole upwards of US$1 billion from banks in 25 countries. The group infiltrated banks by gaining the login credentials to key systems through emails containing malicious code, which were opened by employees.

Hay said Kaspersky approached OpenDNS before the report was published to see if it had information on domains associated with the attacks. NLPRank was already blocking some of the suspicious domains, even though OpenDNS didn’t know more details about the attacks.

“We caught these things well back,” Hay said.

In some cases, NLPRank could allow a domain to be blocked even before one is actively used. After cybercriminals register a domain, they’ll often visit it once to make sure it’s accessible. It may then go dormant for a few days before it is incorporated in a campaign, Hay said.

If a fraudster is connected to an ISP that uses OpenDNS’s service, just a single DNS query for that new domain would allow OpenDNS to analyze and potentially block it before it is used for crime.

“As soon as we see that little bump on the wire, we can block it and monitor to see what’s going on,” Hay said. “It’s almost an early warning system for fraudulent activity.”



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Cybercriminal gang plunders up to $1 billion from banks over two years

Cybercriminal gang plunders up to $1 billion from banks over two years | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

A still-active cybercriminal gang has stolen up to a $1 billion from banks in at least 25 countries over the last two years, infiltrating networks with malware and spying on employees’ computers to facilitate large wire transfers, Kaspersky Lab said Sunday.

The computer security vendor, which said it will release a report Monday on its findings, said the gang penetrated deeply into the banks’ networks, taking time to learn about internal procedures to make their fraudulent activity less suspicious.

In some cases, the gang learned about wire transfer systems by watching administrators’ computers over video.

“In this way the cybercriminals got to know every last detail of the bank clerks’ work and were able to mimic staff activity in order to transfer money and cash out,” Kaspersky said in a news release.

The group, called Carbanak after the malware the gang installed on computers, attempted to attack up to 100 banks and e-payment systems since 2013 in 30 countries. The gang members are suspected to be from Russia, Ukraine, other parts of Europe and China.

Some of the financial institutions affected are in Australia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Iceland, India, Ireland, Morocco, Nepal, Norway, Poland, Pakistan, Romania, Russia, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Ukraine, the U.K., the U.S.

None of the banks or financial institutions have been named. Kaspersky said in a news release on that Interpol and Europol are involved in the investigation.

Each theft took between two and four months, Kaspersky said. Bank computers would be infected with malware through spear-phishing attacks, which involves sending targeted emails with malicious attachments or links to select employees.

Spear-phishing emails are crafted in a way to make it likely a recipient will open an attachment or click a link that appears innocuous but installs malicious software on a computer.

As much as $10 million was stolen in a raid at a time, Kaspersky said. Funds were transferred using online banking or e-payment systems to the gang’s own accounts or to other banks in the U.S. and China.

In other instances, the attackers had deep control within a bank’s accounting systems, inflating account balances in order to mask thefts. For example, Kaspersky said that an account with $1,000 would be raised to $10,000, with $9,000 transferred to the cybercriminals.

ATMs were also targeted, Kaspersky said. The gang commanded the machines to dispense money at a certain time, with accomplices ready to pick up the disgorged cash.


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Cybercrime Affects More Than 431 Million Adult Victims Globally

Cybercrime Affects More Than 431 Million Adult Victims Globally | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Cybercrime affects more than 431 million adult victims around the world. Since the internet has become such an integral part of governments, businesses, and the lives of millions of people, cyberspace has become an ideal place, allowing criminals to remain anonymous while they prey on victims.

The most common forms of cybercrime are offences related to identity, such as malware, hacking, and phishing. Criminals use these methods of cybercrime to steal money and credit card information. Additionally, cybercriminals use the internet for crimes related to child pornography, abuse material, and intellectual and copyright property.

As technology advances, criminals are finding it much easier to perform a cybercrime; advanced techniques and skills to perpetrate threats are no longer required. For instance, software that allows criminals to override passwords and locate access points of computers are easily purchased online. Unfortunately, the ability to find cyber criminals is becoming more difficult.


Cybercrime is a rapidly growing business, exceeding $3 trillion a year. Victims and perpetrators are located anywhere in the world. The effects of cybercrime are seen across societies, stressing the need for a pressing and strong international response.

However, many countries do not have the capacity or regulations to combat cybercrime. A global effort is required to make available firmer regulations and improved protection because cyber criminals hide within legal loopholes in countries with less stringent regulation.

Criminals perpetrate a cybercrime by taking advantage of a country’s weak security measures. Additionally, the lack of cooperation between developing and developed countries can also result in safe havens for individuals and groups who carry out a cybercrime.

The United Nations is actively involved in fighting cybercrime. The organization set up the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) following the 12th Crime Congress to study cybercrime. The UNODC is a global leader in the fight against illicit drugs and international crime.

Cybercrime affects one million victims every single day. More than 431 million people are affected by cybercrime, that’s 14 adult victims every second.

In addition, there are up to 80 million automated hacking attacks every day. The most common and fastest growing forms of consumer fraud on the Internet are identity-related offences, especially through the misuse of credit card information.

Learning online protection methods is one of the simplest means of defense from becoming victim to a cybercrime. When purchasing products online, always be aware of the trustworthiness of the websites.

Avoid using public computers for anything that requires a credit card payment. By all means, be sure online purchases and banking are facilitated with a fully legitimate and safe business.

Computers should have up-to-date security software; choose strong passwords, and do not open suspicious emails or special offers that ask for personal information, which are often in the form of sales, contests, or fake banks.

Internet-related crime, like any other crime, should be reported to appropriate law enforcement investigative authorities at the local, state, federal, or international levels, depending on the scope of the crime.


Via Paulo Félix
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purushothamwebsoftex's curator insight, February 24, 2015 3:05 AM

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Survey shows cyber crime on the rise

Survey shows cyber crime on the rise | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

An estimated 40% of Irish internet users have received emails or phone calls trying to get access to their computer or personal details such as their banking information.

That is according to the latest Eurobarometer poll on the experience of cybercrime.

Nearly a third of Irish internet users have discovered malicious software on their device, but just over half of them have installed anti-virus software.

This compares with an EU average of 61% who have taken this precaution.

16% of Irish internet users - the third highest in the EU - say they have had experience of their social media or email account being hacked compared to an EU average of 12%.

Among the top concerns of Irish people are the misuse of personal data, security of online payments and online purchases.

While Irish people are more aware of cybercrime than the EU average, half of users do not take basic precautions such as changing their passwords every 12 months.

And while internet access in Ireland has never been higher at 80%, Ireland is behind Sweden (96%) the Netherlands (95%) and Denmark (94%).

Lowest access was in Romania (54%), Portugal (55%), and Greece (58%).


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HK Khan's curator insight, February 18, 2015 2:38 AM

We Gives Latest News Of Hacking, Updates Of Cyber Crimes, Computer Technology News, Reviews and Full Version Softwares, Drivers For Laptops