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News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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The dangers of autocomplete passwords

The dangers of autocomplete passwords | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Hackers have found a new way to track you online. Aside from using advertisements and suggestions, they can now use autocomplete passwords to track you down. Feeling insecure? Here are some ways to keep you out of harm’s way.

Why auto-fill passwords are so dangerous

As of December 2018, there are 4.1 billion internet users in the world. This means users have to create dozens of passwords, either to protect their account or simply to meet the password-creation requirements of the platform they’re using. Unfortunately, only 20% of US internet users have different passwords for their multiple online accounts. 


Certain web browsers have integrated a mechanism that enables usernames and passwords to be automatically entered into a web form. On the other hand, password manager applications have made it easy to access login credentials. But these aren’t completely safe.


Tricking a browser or password manager into giving up this saved information is incredibly simple. All a hacker needs to do is place an invisible form on a compromised webpage to collect users’ login information.

Using auto-fill to track users

For over a decade, there’s been a password security tug-of-war between hackers and cybersecurity professionals. Little do many people know that shrewd digital marketers also use password auto-fill to track user activity.

 

Digital marketing groups AdThink and OnAudience have been placing these invisible login forms on websites to track the sites that users visit. They’ve made no attempts to steal passwords, but security professionals said it wouldn’t have been hard for them to do. AdThink and OnAudience simply tracked people based on the usernames in hidden auto-fill forms and sold the information they gathered to advertisers.

One simple security tip for today

A quick and effective way to improve your account security is to turn off auto-fill in your web browser. Here’s how to do it:

  • If you’re using Chrome – Open the Settings window, click Advanced, and select the appropriate settings under Manage Passwords.
  • If you’re using Firefox – Open the Options window, click Privacy, and under the History heading, select “Firefox will: Use custom settings for history.” In the new window, disable “Remember search and form history.”
  • If you’re using Safari – Open the Preferences window, select the Auto-fill tab, and turn off all the features related to usernames and passwords.

This is just one small thing you can do to keep your accounts and the information they contain safe. 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Information Technology in Today’s Veterinary Practice -

Information Technology in Today’s Veterinary Practice - | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

5 Common challenges of the traditional veterinary practice

  • Paper record keeping, appointment scheduling, service reminder distribution
  • Increased labor cost due to inefficiency
  • Difficulty in accurately managing inventory and accounting
  • Lack of advertisement avenues and initiatives
  • No connection with necessary modern medical equipment, associated practices, or specialty practices

We will now discuss the advantages of moving to a cloud based practice management system.

Why should a practice utilize cloud based technology?

Accuracy of records, reporting, and scheduling

In a paper record practice, patient files can be difficult to locate, reference, and store. Staff may be frequently disorganized, and it may slow the process of patient care. Your staff will likely spend more time shuffling paperwork than providing medical attention.

With a cloud based practice, patient files are easily accessible, updated real-time, and require no physical space for storage. The ability to schedule appointments is streamlined and accurate, reducing client wait-time and cancelled visits.

Increasing client compliance

In a paper record practice, staff is responsible for tracking services due which may lead to missing service reminders or sending redundant communications. But with a cloud based practice, the system does the work for you.  It allows you to send reminders in a variety of ways; postcards, emails, and text messages.

Reducing costs of operation

In a paper record practice, the cost is obvious. The physical storage demands are large and those costs will only continue to grow over time.  The inefficiencies in finding records, tracking service due dates, and communicating with the client is large and are frequently error prone. And in an installed system, you have to worry about the cost of purchasing equipment and updating that equipment.

 

With a cloud based practice, no servers or backups are required which frees up the staff and resources to allow them to provide better patient care. Cloud based systems usually have a low upfront cost with a reasonable monthly subscription price. The monthly price includes the system, automatic updates, support, and training.

Staff productivity and satisfaction

Let’s be honest, most veterinary clinic staff members joined this industry to spend time with animals and to help provide quality care. Managing paper records or an installed system isn’t something they bought into. However, they can leverage their system to help with the quality of care.

 

With a cloud based practice, staff can become more efficient giving them more time to do what they love which is being with the patient and providing that care. A happier staff normally translates to higher revenue.

Client interaction and communication

For a paper record practice, client interaction is limited to office visits, phone calls, and direct mailings. But with a cloud based practice, you get all those plus the ability to email, text message, client portal (pet portal), and social media.

Business growth and expansion

The record keeping process with which you run your practice shouldn’t prevent growth. Using paper records will take a toll on resources and will stifle growth.  An installed system will require more upkeep as hardware becomes outdated.  It is also very common to start with a hardware setup to support your clinic, but then grow out of that hardware setup. This would require new hardware and servers.

With a cloud based practice, servers are managed by the software vendor and are set up to grow with the business.

Medical technology and cross practice connectivity

For a paper record practice, there is no option to seamlessly pull in lab results, radiographs, or specialists’ reports – they must all be stored separately.  Coordinating this with a multi-location practice is near impossible.

With an install system, you can at least connect your software to external devices like lab analyzers and x-ray equipment. However, you can’t easily connect multi-location practices.

With a cloud based system, you can do both and do both well. In a multi-location practice, you can easily access one or more clinics from the same computer or device. You can also share clients and patients across locations reducing double entry. In most cases, you can run reports that show a group practice view which is near impossible with paper or installed systems.

Eddie Heinz is the CEO of eVetPractice.com, a leading provider of veterinary practice management software. Founded in 2011, the company’s clientele spans more than 40 states within the United States, as well as Canada and Australia.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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In Situ Cured Silicone Could Enable Personalized Implants

In Situ Cured Silicone Could Enable Personalized Implants | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Medical-grade silicone is a highly valued, versatile biomaterial widely used for medical implants. Often associated with applications such as cardiovascular pacemakers, cochlear implants, hydrocephalus shunts, implantable infusion pumps, and even intraocular lenses, silicones began to be used for a broad range of orthopedic medical applications beginning in the 1960s. The idea of replacing the small joints of the hand with silicone implants was first introduced by Swanson about 50 years ago.1 Since then, medical-grade silicone elastomer implants have become common in the replacement of diseased small joints. Typically, silicone elastomers are used to fabricate components of devices or entire devices, which are then assembled, packaged, and sterilized prior to implantation via surgery. Now, new dispensing technology serves as a means to provide an alternate method of surgical implantation, where uncured pre-sterilized silicone can be provided as a part of the surgical kit and cured in situ during the orthopedic procedure.

 

Benefits and Innovation
Silicone provides a diverse range of characteristics that make it useful, with properties ranging from very sticky to very slippery, and from soft and pliable to stiff or rigid. Consequently, it is very attractive for different medical uses, such as molded parts or lubricious coatings for medical devices; soft silicone adhesives for wound care; soft tissue implants; and even high-modulus tubing.

 

Device manufacturers often choose silicone for its established pedigree of biocompatibility, unique physical properties, and its ability to be altered at the polymer level. This ability to let manufacturers custom-modify material properties to satisfy specific medical device requirements has given silicone a reputation as a high-technology biomaterial that invites innovation.

 

Innovation in silicones, however, is expanding beyond the properties of the biomaterial itself. A new development in sterilizable dispensing systems allows sterile, uncured silicone elastomers to be considered for therapeutic use in orthopedic and other applications where pre-formed silicone implants are traditionally used. By enabling the silicone to be cured to its final form in situ within the specific area in the body receiving the implant, new approaches to orthopedic device design, fabrication, and implantation have the potential to be developed.

 

Medical-Grade Silicones: Value for Implantable Devices
To explore the value of in situ cured silicone elastomers in orthopedic applications, it’s helpful to examine some key traits and performance considerations that make silicone particularly appealing for implants.

 

Biocompatibility: Medical-grade silicones have been proven to be chemically stable for use in long-term implantable devices, with results demonstrating that biocompatible silicones are not harmful to living tissue.

 

The biomaterials supply crisis of the early 1990s presented a significant testing and documentation challenge for medical device manufacturers. There was a need to provide exhaustive safety data to obtain the regulatory approval required to market their products. Silicone especially, as the primary material from which breast implants are made, received intense evaluation. As a result, more than two decades of laboratory and clinical research and experience with silicone-containing medical devices of all types has produced thousands of peer-reviewed articles, as well as carefully considered regulatory decisions. These findings validate the safety and biocompatibility of implantable devices manufactured with silicone.

 

Customization: Silicone-based implanted orthopedic devices have multiple therapeutic applications, whether for finger joints or even spinal repair. Depending upon how it is used, each device has unique physical property requirements, such as firmness, cushioning ability, or flexibility. The advantage of silicone is its ability to be highly customized, so the desired properties such as elasticity, fatigue resistance, and durometer can be formulated for the appropriate functionality in a device.

 

Durability: Cured silicone retains its properties over long periods of time. This is especially useful in applications such as finger joint replacement, where the elasticity of the moving joint is a key characteristic. In long-term implantable applications, whatever balance of elasticity or firmness the device manufacturer specifies needs to be sustained over the life of the implant.

 

Curability: To fully leverage the properties of silicone, the material must be cured to activate these properties and make the material chemically stable. A widely used method for curing silicone is platinum-catalyzed addition cure. With this method, a platinum-based catalyst is included in the silicone formulation to activate crosslinking. Depending upon the final application, the silicone can cure to be relatively flexible or very hard. Platinum-catalyzed, addition cure chemistry is frequently chosen for implanted medical devices because there are no catalyzation byproducts; all formulation components are chemically bonded in the polymer matrix. Another benefit is the platinum catalyzation allows for flexibility in controlling the cure rate over a wide range of time and temperature.

 

Benefits of In Situ Cured Silicones in Orthopedics
The distinctive features of silicone offer tremendous potential value for therapeutic orthopedic applications. For example, they can create a seal, fill a void, provide cushioning, or enable flexibility. These types of applications can perform best when they fit the anatomy of a patient.

 

Until recently, silicone orthopedic devices were typically produced, cured, and sterilized prior to surgical implantation. However, the advent of silicone that can be cured in situ at the site of the implant is appealing for several reasons. In situ curing of medical-grade silicones in the body, rather than fabricating the device outside the body and implanting it, increases the ability to customize the fit of implanted orthopedic devices, since it is more of a “real-time” implant. In fact, research has already been conducted on the use of in situ-cured silicones in spinal applications. In vertebral repair, for example, it is conceivable that in situ-cured silicone could enable a custom-fit device. Using in situ-cured silicone implants also opens possibilities for less invasive implantation procedures. In addition, customization of in situ-cured silicone enables the material properties to be “tuned” in accordance with specific therapeutic requirements. For example, viscosity can be defined to make in situ implantation and curing easier to accomplish. The cure time can be tuned, so that the silicone cures in situ at body temperature. Moreover, the final physical properties of the material can be precisely defined to provide the desired performance, such as a specific level of hardness, if the orthopedic application is to support; or softness, if the orthopedic device is meant to cushion.

 

Sterilizing Silicone for Implants
As the industry reviews the potential for versatility and usefulness of in situ-cured silicone materials for orthopedic implants, another key factor to consider is sterilization. In order to be implanted, devices pre-fabricated with medical-grade silicones must be sterilized—so an efficient and fully verifiable sterilization solution is necessary.

 

The traditional method for producing silicone orthopedic devices uses a multi-step process. Although methods vary between manufacturers, most implants are molded from liquid silicone, which is then cured. This cured, molded part is typically placed along with other devices used for a specific therapeutic application into a single package or tray, which is then sealed and sterilized before it is delivered for use with a patient.

 

A number of processes can be used to sterilize uncured silicone. However, these processes have had challenges in the past with sterilization of platinum-catalyzed, addition cure silicones in their uncured state.

 

  • Gamma and electron-beam irradiation: May cause premature cure
  • Dry heat and autoclave: May be detrimental for heat- or moisture-sensitive formulation ingredients and packaging components

 

Exposing the silicone to ethylene oxide (EtO) gas is a widely used and effective sterilization method when used with compatible packaging to allow for ingress and egress of the sterilant gas. The implant is typically packaged along with the other components in the orthopedic surgical kit and sterilized as a single unit.

This process works for implants that are fabricated and cured prior to implantation. However, a technical challenge often faced by silicone manufacturers is how to package uncured silicones, so they can be sterilized then later used for in situ-cured therapeutic treatments.

 

New Packaging Enables Sterilization
Designed specifically to allow sterilization of uncured medical grade silicones, a new innovation in silicone dispensing systems makes in situ-cured silicone implants for orthopedics possible.

This novel, patented system2 features a dual-cartridge prefilled dispensing system. One cartridge contains the uncured silicone while the other contains the catalyzing agent. Each cartridge has a gas-permeable plunger seal that allows EtO sterilant gas to permeate through the plunger seal to sterilize the contents of the cartridge.


Key features of the packaging system include:

  • Disposable syringes that are available in a variety of sizes—5.0, 10, 25, 50, and 75 mL—which offers choices to help match the needs for the specific quantity of material required
  • One-step sterilization of both the material in the cartridge and the packaging
  • Easily adaptable to a variety of injection technologies
  • Engineered for use in complete surgical kits

 

Testing of this two-part dispensing system demonstrated that, after sterilization, the uncured silicones were fully sterilized, and there was no residual EtO remaining in the material. Equally important, there was minimal change to key silicone physical properties, such as rheology, durometer, modulus, work time, and cure rate.

 

Thus, the highly valued material properties of silicone—and the increased versatility and custom-fit capabilities offered by in situ curing of silicone—are now more viable through a dispensing system that can be efficiently and effectively sterilized prior to the orthopedic procedure.

 

The development of a new patented dual-cartridge prefilled silicone dispensing system makes in situ silicone curing a practical reality, offering the orthopedic community the potential to explore new therapeutic approaches that provide better outcomes to meet the implant needs of patients.

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Healthcare Cloud Security And Data Protection 

Healthcare Cloud Security And Data Protection  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

a report from Gemalto indicated that it is no surprise that security breaches are frequently happening in the healthcare industry. Their Data Breach info-graphic shows out of the total data breaches 34% was reported in healthcare while 31% government files were breached, followed by 15% breaches taking place in technology firm records. What is the reason for the healthcare industry being the main target? The answer partially is money. A report from Security Week notes that hackers and thieves make $363 on an average per medical file. Here is why physician practices, medical providers and enterprises should use cloud based security to ensure safety of patient data.

 

1. Low Cost – Cloud based data storage offers more security and it is less expensive than trying to protect data in your office with motion activated cameras and armed security guards.

 

2. More Protection – Cloud based companies work in association with global web security firms to give multiple layer of protection to your data.

 

3. Greater Vigilance – Cloud based security offers immediate and continuous threat detection which works round the clock. This is not an option seen in most medical practices because they have to employ staff and resources to ensure 24/7 security.

While opting for cloud based security, vendors give healthcare providers the best security measures available in the industry without any initial investment. It is better used cloud based security resources while giving patient care to avoid data breach.

 

 
 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:

Contact Details :
inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com/tdr

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