IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Is it ok to store my clinic data in the cloud?

Is it ok to store my clinic data in the cloud? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

If like me you enjoyed gazing out of the window at school, watching the clouds go by during double maths this is for you. Everything seems to be in the cloud these days; music, pictures and all the app things I use to try and make my life a little easier. But as much as I enjoy gazing upwards what is it all really about? What does it mean for you and your clinic? Let’s start at the beginning.

What is the cloud?

In the simplest terms, the cloud means storing and accessing data and programs over the Internet instead of your computer’s hard drive. That’s probably almost as much as you need to know but please read on!

 

When you store data on or run programs from the hard drive, that’s called local storage. Everything you need is physically close to you, which means accessing your data can be fast and easy, for that one computer. But there are downsides. When information is only stored on your computer’s hard drive you are at risk from all of the usual dangers in life; coffee spills, loss of computer …. computer dying, I’m sure we all have stories along those lines. So what does it mean to have your information in the cloud?

 

Well, “The Cloud” is a buzzword that suggests everything is floating in the sky. But the reality is that the cloud is not floating above our heads, it is a physical infrastructure, its many computers all over the world. Unsurprisingly many people don’t take the time to wonder where their data actually goes or how it gets there they are just happy that it works.

What are the benefits to working in the cloud?

Working in the cloud can allow your clinic to be nimble, efficient and cost-effective. If your clinic quickly needs access to more resources, it can be scaled up quickly in the cloud. Also, if you experience any of the events mentioned above which would have a serious impact on your business your information will be safe as it’s not directly inside the damaged or lost computer. I hope that all makes sense now? Now for the really clever TM3 bit.

Cloud and Data storage

At Blue-Zinc we have a systems team who manage and develop the TM3 business cloud and as we are always trying to improve things we came up with the best possible solution available. The team has taken the flexibility of the cloud but rather than having your information roaming on random servers somewhere your data is stored in the UK (data centres certified with ISO 27001 and ISO 9001) on dedicated servers which Blue-Zinc own and the guys lovingly maintain and polish on your behalf. Security patches are regularly applied to our servers to ensure that any vulnerabilities are patched as soon as they’re identified. In addition, the SQL server database with encrypted VPN services gives users the highest levels of security available and all data is automatically backed up for you!

Feature-rich private practice software

So, with TM3, you have flexibility and safety all in one. It also means that you have access to our other cloud services Pronto, Online bookings and many more features which 10,000 practitioners worldwide enjoy on a daily basis. So, for now, my head might be in the clouds but at least I know where my data is!

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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What is telemedicine involved and how much does it cost? 

What is telemedicine involved and how much does it cost?  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Now that the use of telemedicine is surging to an all-time high, organizations can easily get lost in implementing the technology just to stay on top of the latest and greatest, but it is easy to get lost in the vast amount of telemedicine technology and equipment options available.

 

If you are researching your telemedicine options, applying for a grant or just need to put your budget plans together, here are six key elements and associated costs for you to consider.

1. Medical Devices for Specialties

The specific medical devices you need may vary depending on the specialties you plan to serve with telemedicine. The good news is you don't need to have all the answers right away because many equipment providers have scalable and modular telemedicine systems. This means you can purchase just what you need to get started and then add additional devices later on as your program expands into additional specialties. 

 

The cost of medical devices for basic primary care services can range from $5,000-$10,000, and this would include devices such as an examination camera, ENT scope, and digital stethoscope.

2. Communication Platform and Video Conferencing Needs

How you plan to manage the patient-to-remote encounter is also a key component to consider for clinical telemedicine applications. Since you are communicating a patient's critical diagnostic data, the optimal choice is to do it securely and in real time. After all, the beauty of telemedicine is the functionality to have a live interaction between a patient and a remote specialist.

 

AMD Telemedicine recommends using a Web-based encounter management portal to communicate and aggregate medical device data and share it live with the remote physician. This is truly the best way to offer telemedicine services that are as close to an in-person visit as possible. For video conferencing, it is best to first evaluate any video conferencing investments your organization might have already made to see if these can be leveraged for your current application. Many times they integrate seamlessly with encounter management platforms.

 

Depending on your video conferencing needs, you can complement a Web-based telemedicine portal with either software- or hardware-based video conferencing. To go the software-based route can cost as little as $1,500 per patient site with no cost for the remote provider. The cost for hardware-based video conferencing can start around $10,000 per patient site and increases with the number of remote provider sites you need.

3. Packaging Design and Mobility

Telemedicine carts, cases, wall mounts, and other equipment are all just various ways to package the telemedicine hardware and software. Although there is a difference in how aesthetically pleasing they are (or are not), the main thing to keep in mind is whether this packaging will fulfill your intended use, not just now but also in the near future.

 

Ideally, you want a telemedicine cart or case that is modular and can be easily configured for additional medical specialties so it can evolve with your program. For some applications, such as school-based health centers or long-term care facilities, it is helpful to select a telemedicine system that is an all-in-one package. This helps streamline the purchasing, maintenance, and support for those that don't have a dedicated IT team for their telemedicine programs. All-in-one telemedicine systems that include the telemedicine software, primary care medical devices and the mobile cart/case can range from $20,000 to upward of $28,000.

4. Bandwidth and Internet Connection Recommendations

You may be pleased to know that you don't need to invest in a significant infrastructure overhaul to make telemedicine a reality for your clinic. Of course, your specific needs will vary depending on factors such as location and size or your organization, but the most important consideration is not how much bandwidth you need, but rather how reliable and consistent your bandwidth is.

 

The most common Internet connections are shared with others, which can cause the upload and download speeds to lag and be interrupted at busy times. So finding a reputable Internet service provider with a commitment to reliable service is the first step. If possible, purchase a business-grade service so you experience a more consistent bandwidth capability to ensure your real-time data is not interrupted or compromised in any way.

5. Training

You already staff your organization or practice with top-notch doctors and nurses, so the next step is to provide these health care professionals with the skills and knowledge they need to best make use of your new telemedicine technology in daily operations.

 

Fortunately, clinical telemedicine equipment training isn't a complicated need to meet, especially if your staff has any familiarity with basic medical devices and modern communication technology.

 

There are two types of training programs to ensure the long-term success of clinical telemedicine programs: user training for clinicians and nurses, and technical training and installation for the IT staff. Training programs like these can range from $200 to $2,000 per site depending on the complexity of equipment, the number of users and other factors. Additionally, the American Telemedicine Association is a fantastic resource for training and education.

6. Support

Finally, the increased reliance on network connectivity and Internet technology at your office means that you'll need to ensure that you have adequate IT staff support. This is likely more of a concern for smaller practices that may not have an in-house IT department. It's a good idea to talk to your telemedicine vendor to determine if it provides installation services, as well as what technical support options are available if you don't have an IT staff of your own.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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Professional Development Advice from Technology Leaders

Professional Development Advice from Technology Leaders | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

This edition of AppointmentPlus Radio brings together two industry leaders within the tech sector. Raymond Wiley, a general manager with Sun-Tec America, shares the story of how he landed his current position, as well as the philosophy that shapes his professional interactions. Dhruv Bhate, a senior technologist who works in 3D printing, offers insight into how reflection on your true values can lead to a meaningful work life. The two also discuss:

 

  • The importance of finding your professional “sweet spot”
  • How to understand, and communicate your professional value
  • Why defining what you do also mean defining what you don’t do
  • Plus: 5 must-have personal technology recommendations and 2 must-read books to overhaul your professional mindset

 

 

About Raymond and Dhruv: 

Raymond Wiley is the general manager at Sun-Tec America, LLC where he is responsible for the go-to-market strategies for Sun-Tec’s high precision lamination, labeling, and taping equipment portfolio for the Americas and European markets. He is the primary interface between the customer and the Sun-Tec design engineers located in Japan and is charged with overseeing the entire sales process through every phase of the project. Previously, Raymond spent 21 years at Motorola in the Semiconductor Products Sector serving in a variety of increasingly responsible positions including operations manager for the Small Signal and MEMS Sensor Businesses in Japan.

 

Dhruv Bhate is a Senior Technologist at Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies, Inc. (PADT) where he leads R&D efforts in Additive Manufacturing, with a focus on high-performance polymers and metals. Prior to joining PADT, Dhruv spent 7 years at Intel Corporation developing laser-based manufacturing processes. Dhruv has a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Purdue University and a Master’s from the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he developed fracture models for ductile metal alloys and to simulate adhesion in MEMS.

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Online Scheduling Software Is Revolutionizing the Wellness Industry

Online Scheduling Software Is Revolutionizing the Wellness Industry | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Appointment-Plus, the industry leader in online customer self-scheduling software, announced several major additions to its growing wellness and health screening client base. Major program providers such as Lifecare, Inc., which serves more than 4.5 million individuals, have quickly implemented Appointment-Plus web-based scheduling software to solve many of the thorny scheduling issues often associated with corporate wellness and health screening programs. Appointment-Plus seamlessly manages these large appointment volumes by allowing corporate employees and healthcare members to self-schedule via a secure Internet portal.

 

In addition to Lifecare, Appointment-Plus was also recently selected to be the online scheduling solution utilized by Self-Insured Schools of California (SISC), a health insurance group of over 300 school districts in the California education system. SISC will use Appointment-Plus software to allow thousands of school district employees and dependents to schedule health screenings across the State of California. With the integration of both the online self-scheduling software and the call center services offered by Appointment-Plus, SISC will maintain a comprehensive scheduling solution that meets all aspects of the employee and dependent scheduling process.

 

The appointment-plus software offers wellness providers the ability to customize the system to meet very specific scheduling needs, including the option to private label both the member scheduling view and the administrative view of the system. In addition, Appointment-Plus offers an enterprise solution if required for large projects. The enterprise solution allows wellness providers a web services toolkit to interface Appointment-Plus information with other systems.

 

Because Appointment-Plus operates on a software as a service (SaaS) model, wellness providers can implement the system with virtually no up-front or capital costs. In addition, because the member self-scheduling process eliminates much of the traditional manual scheduling process, using Appointment-Plus is a cost-saving measure for programs. Appointment-Plus accounts are scalable to allow scheduling across multiple client-companies and client-locations. With its robust reporting functionality, Appointment-Plus also effectively manages wellness project information needs.

 

“The flexibility and functionality of the Appointment-Plus system have been a key factor in its success for wellness providers,” said Jeff Fleming, Director of Business Development for Appointment-Plus, “Wellness providers, their clients, and their members really appreciate the simplicity of member self-scheduling and the corresponding business efficiency.”

 

Appointment-Plus is a technology firm that specializes in the development of web-based scheduling and appointment software for a wide variety of applications and industries. Appointment-Plus software clients include Fortune 500 companies such as Pepsi and Comcast, federal and local government, universities and schools, and small/medium sized businesses worldwide. In 2007, Microsoft Corp. selected Appointment-Plus software as its referral source for all appointment manager software clients.

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Making your clinic & staff more efficient

Making your clinic & staff more efficient | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Data collection on staff activity allows managers and leaders to determine how their team is spending their time and which activities take up the most of their working day. This post will help make your clinic and staff more efficient.

 

Data collection tools give you a clear picture of how your staff spends their time at work and how they can become more productive.

 

This is important in health businesses, as you are able to determine where your front desk and administration staff are spending their time.

 

I will use one of our clients as an example, they have two clinics and the managers found that there was always a workload on the weekend staff for scanning and administration. The staff that worked during the week were never able to complete the scanning, filing and other administrative tasks during their working day, resulting in a backlog of weekend staff.

 

By using the activity tracking software, they found out that the weekday staff was spending all of their time on the clinical software booking appointments and taking calls. This confirmed that the workload during the week was too much for the staff and allowed the client to justify hiring a new front desk staff member to complete the scanning and filing during the week.

 

You can use the data to:

  • Challenge your staff to spend an hour less a day on emails and use this hour to work on a project
  • Determine the average time staff spend on social media whilst they are in the office and raise alarms if, for example, a staff member has spent more than two hours on Facebook
  • Set yourself some goals, for example, spend less time on administration and more time using the clinical software.

 

A product that we use and is RescueTime. It is installed on all the devices in the workplace and it gives both staff and management a report of their efficiency, productivity, and areas of concern.

 

We use this software to determine processes in our workflow that need to improve and find out how productive we are compared to other staff members.

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Protecting Your Personal Data Stored In The Cloud

Protecting Your Personal Data Stored In The Cloud | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

IT professionals, healthcare executives, and clinicians in hospitals, health systems and clinics around the world are expressing great interest in moving more of their organizations’ IT applications and services to the public cloud. The concept of having a more flexible, scalable, cost-effective means to provide information communications technologies for their business both today and well into the future is very appealing. However, in order to make such a move, these same organizations must be extremely confident that any cloud service provider they do business with maintains the highest possible standards for data privacy and security.

 

This week, Microsoft announced a major milestone. Microsoft is the first major cloud provider to adopt the world’s first international standard for cloud privacy. That standard is known as ISO/IEC 27018. It was  developed  by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) to establish a uniform, international approach to protecting the privacy for personal data stored in the cloud.  That Microsoft meets the new ISO/IEC 20718 standard for Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics CRM Online has been independently verified by the British Standards Institute (BSI). Similarly, Bureau Veritas has done the same for Microsoft Intune.

 

ISO 27018 assures enterprise customers that privacy will be protected in several distinct ways. Adherence to the standard means that enterprise customers are in control of their data according to the instructions that they provide Microsoft as their customer. It means that they will know what is happening with their data at all times. In addition, the standard provides a number of important security safeguards. It also affirms Microsoft’s longstanding commitment not to use enterprise customer data for advertising purposes. The standard also requires that law enforcement requests for disclosure of personally identifiable data must be disclosed to an enterprise customer unless this disclosure is prohibited by law. Microsoft has already adhered to this approach (and more), and adoption of the new standard reinforces this commitment.

 

For health organizations, Microsoft has also been a model for meeting the information privacy requirements of HIPAA and for signing Business Associates Agreements with health customers who use the company’s public cloud resources. All of this should give healthcare customers who entrust Microsoft with their data the highest levels of confidence.

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Philippe Thuaud's curator insight, July 12, 2016 10:20 PM
A new ISO/IEC 27018 standard for cloud privacy. Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics CRM meets the requirement and has adopted this new standard
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How To Reduce Healthcare Consumers' Anger ?

How To Reduce Healthcare Consumers' Anger ? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

However, I am not angry at my doctor, my insurance company, the government, or with "the computer." I'm exasperated with the so-called professionals who installed the computer system in my doctor's office. Unfortunately, the incident I'm about to describe isn't one-off.

 

American healthcare's reliance on information technology is an unprecedented and relatively recent change. To make sure that this change is not only "meaningful" but transformative, means it must be done right. Sometimes, more often than necessary, it isn't. Healthcare IT professionals are frequently at fault, and I'd like to recommend how we can do better.

 

A few weeks ago, I called my physician's office and requested that it send a drug refill to my mail order pharmacy, because I would run out before my next office visit. Soon the office called to say that my doctor had sent the order. Great! I would have my prescription in a couple of weeks. Worry free, I could continue my road warrior job traveling to hospitals to help them make sense of the rapidly changing health IT environment. Or so I thought.

By the day before Thanksgiving, I still had no drugs. I was about to run out.

 

I went to my pharmacy's web site and learned -- ouch! -- that it had never received a prescription. Of course, I could not contact my doctor because of the holiday, not even by the following Monday; the staff had been given an extra day off to enjoy their leftover turkey.

 

"Worry free" time was over. On Tuesday, the office receptionist instantly discovered the issue. "Oh! I see what happened. We just changed computer systems and some people's pharmacies didn't get converted right. Your prescription went to the wrong mail order pharmacy." After various back-and-forths, guess what else she uncovered? The new system had reverted me to a three year old address.

 

Now I was angry and still am. This isn't personal. Of course, I "fixed" the immediate problem, forking over an extra $25 co-pay after a few days of heightened cholesterol. No, my anger is about professionalism, or lack thereof, in my chosen field – healthcare IT.

 

As an IT professional, I KNOW this should never have happened. The fault is not with the physician's office, the mail order pharmacy, nor even with the physician's parent health system -- because converting all their physicians to an EHR platform shared with the hospital was a very good idea. No, my finger is pointing at the implementation project manager for a software vendor that I won't name, and a project manager at a consulting firm that I can't name either. One or more of these people bungled their jobs in at least one of these ways:

 

  • Deciding to convert data from the old system to the new system and not doing it right.
  • Neglecting to review the results of the conversion before loading it into the new system.
  • Not having a valid testing/quality methodology to catch the mix-up, or more likely just not making sure it was properly applied.
  • Deciding to go live before the time was right. The project manager perhaps didn't know this, and so failed at his/her job. Worse, perhaps he knew of the conversion issues and didn't have the backbone to call them out and fix them before a go-live that would potentially put patients' health at risk.

IT vendors and consultants must be trusted partners in hospitals' solutions, not perpetrators of needless mistakes and risk. This is healthcare, not Macy's. When we get IT wrong, people can die!

Over my 20+ year career, I've seen a lot happen in healthcare IT. Most of it has been good, but some of it was scary, like the folly described above. When it's scary, it's usually also needlessly expensive. Those expenses eventually roll back to consumers. Hmmm…aren't ever-increasing costs a central element to consumers' anger with our healthcare system? Aside from their frequent frustration with scenarios such as my Thanksgiving experience?

 

Healthcare IT professionals can do better and should. Those who are passionate about their work care whether prescriptions get filled, diagnoses are correctly recorded, and the right healthcare is delivered. They do not see themselves as technicians, but as accountable care-delivery partners with physicians and clinicians. But many consultants and project managers don't go that additional mile or two of accountability -- one that should never be considered "extra." Let me share some principles I've learned that everyone in healthcare IT can benefit from if they really want to contribute to better US healthcare.

 

1. In healthcare IT, be careful with the Pareto principle. There's not a project I've been on where design decisions about how to get an 80% bang for our 20% buck weren't considered. This happens, especially in workflow design, where the healthcare environment is so complex you just can't get to the 100% level.   But you cannot take the same shortcuts with data. If the healthcare data isn't right, bad things happen:

 

  • Physicians rely on inaccurate (and missing) data to make clinical decisions that can injure or kill. There are many reasons for morbidity and mortality in healthcare. Information technology shouldn't be one of them.
  • Incorrect bills that exasperate patients and payers get submitted, which take time and money to fix. If too many of those bad bills get to CMS, it won't be heaven that breaks loose.
  • Items get missed. For example, charges go AWOL, causing the hospital not to be reimbursed. CFOs want to know why their revenue has dropped…CEOs and Boards want to know a lot more.

2. Eliminate unwarranted data conversion costs. Hospitals often spend ten to 100 times what it would have cost to get it right the first time. I'm working with a hospital now that experienced a flawed patient records conversion from their previous billing system. This blunder has required the hospital to maintain their previous billing platform for six years, just to have a place to look up that data. They've paid hardware and software costs, spent immeasurable IT hours just keeping the old platform running, and wasted easily as many billing hours sorting out master patient index issues. Maintenance of this legacy mess is not sustainable. Doing the right thing now – switching to a new platform and converting exactly no patient data is going to be painful, especially when reregistering patients for the first time. The hospital is wisely making this move, after immense unnecessary spending.

 

3. Watch for what you can't see. It's as important as what you can, but a lot harder to verify. It's much easier to find a duplicate charge -- even the payers will be nice enough to point these out – than a missing charge. Once you find the latter, you have to go looking for others like it, and you're likely to discover far more than you feared. A while back, during a random quality audit, my team discovered one account that appeared to be incorrectly adjusted. While the account was in the right queue to be worked, no one had noticed the problem because the payer's incorrect adjustment put the account at zero balance. Because work queries were set to ignore $0 balance accounts, this issue would not have been found were it not for the random audit.

 

4. Outliers are the most critical data. That account I mentioned previously? Once we looked further, we found almost 7,000 accounts over two years that had the same issue. We could have fixed about 90% of them with a query. It was the 10% outliers that hurt. The billing team had to touch all of the affected accounts to correct the write-offs, and refund several hundred patients who were mistakenly billed a balance after the primary payer's error rolled to the secondary payer. Assumptions that all the cases fit a certain pattern lead to dangerous shortcuts.

 

5. It doesn't matter how good your systems are if your processes are poor. I can't count the times I've been called to fix a system issue that actually was a data issue, and that the precipitating problem was the process set up to maintain the data needed by the system. Some examples:

  • Security issues where employees who were terminated had their accounts removed, but physician accounts were left active, because physicians weren't "employees."
  • Hours spent researching why something isn't working, only to learn that the test and production systems (their lookup data) were different, because no one was maintaining the test system.
  • Issues where a queue of missed charges piled up (unseen, of course) because apharmacy interface required a perfect match between the pharmacy system and the charge master, and no one was working the interface rejects list.

6. Finally, it's just as important to push for no-live as for go-live. No question, this is a difficult scenario. You're putting in a new system. You've worked nights and weekends and equally pushed your team in order to make the go-live date. Now, you have to walk into a formal go/no-go decision meeting, complete with all the hospital's executives champing at the bit. As the project manager, you are responsible for making sure that the no-go option really is an option. Remember my previous points: bad data = big costs, and in healthcare if we don't get it right, people can die. Letting a system go live before it's ready is as close to malpractice as letting a patient go home who isn't ready. I've made the no-go decision twice. I even lost my job one of those times. No one died, and the company is still in business. 

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The IT Benefits Of Cloud-Based EHR Systems

The IT Benefits Of Cloud-Based EHR Systems | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

With cloud-based EHR systems, practices benefit from economy of scale. Many providers use the same system to minimize or eliminate redundant costs.

 

When choosing an electronic health record (EHR) system, providers have the choice of hosting the software on their own network (client-server) or an EHR system where the software is hosted on a remote server accessed through the Internet (cloud-based). While both systems have advantages over paper records, cloud-based EHR systems offer significant benefits to small practices over the client-server model. Let’s examine some of the IT advantages cloud-based EHRs bring to the table.

REDUCED STARTUP COSTS

The cost of setting up a client-server EHR is a significant hurdle to a small practice.  The startup costs can range upward of $40,000 just for a single practice. With cloud-based EHR systems, practices benefit from economy of scale. Since many providers use the same system, redundant costs are minimized or eliminated.

LOWER INFRASTRUCTURE AND IT COSTS

Client-server EHRs require the practice to purchase or lease expensive hardware. Practices must hire IT staff or pay for the services of IT personnel to set up, test, maintain and upgrade the hardware and software.

With a cloud-based EHR, all of the costs of running the system are covered by the EHR vendor or hosting company. There are no hardware, network or maintenance costs to the practice over the typical equipment setup required to run a medical care business.

COST PREDICTABILITY

The costs of a client-server system can lead to unpredictable costs. If the server crashes or an upgrade goes wrong, the practice’s emergency fund takes a hit, or worse. Cloud-based EHR systems have consistent costs that allows the practice owner to feel confident in their financial projections. The practice simply pays a monthly or quarterly access fee, much like the fee for phone or Internet.

SIMPLER IMPLEMENTATION AND SCALABILITY

The process of setting up and testing a client-server EHR is more complex than cloud-based systems, and scaling up as your practice grows usually requires additional equipment or licensing costs. Under a cloud-based EHR the practice personnel access the system through a secure web site or client software installed on their computers. Gaining capacity is simply a matter of contacting the EHR vendor and adding more users.

BETTER PATIENT DATA SECURITY

If your practice currently relies on paper records for storing patient data, imagine what could happen if you had a fire, flood or other disaster. Insurance covers new equipment, but patient data is irreplaceable. While practices with client-server EHRs generally have off-site backups, the data is vulnerable during transport and the practice must pay extra for storage costs. Cloud-based EHR records are transferred using secure encryption and backed up in multiple locations automatically at no extra cost.

 

While it might make sense for a large medical institution with a network and IT staff already in place to adopt the client-server model, we believe new practices and small health care providers looking to move away from paper records or change EHR systems will receive the greatest benefit in going with a cloud-based solution.

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The Doctor Must Evolve With Technology 

The Doctor Must Evolve With Technology  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

The Doctor may say “I’m not a techie” but no one has to be a techie to try a technology. The eyes of a doctor are strong enough to discover the most deadly disease in a human being, and then why not try the eyes on discovering technology too. A small idea of a technology is enough to improvise your career, along with your knowledge. Being a doctor, using the best medical technology in your hospital/clinic makes your work easier and well-organized. With technology you can get the clear images of patient’s body, his health condition, refer his health records, conduct a surgery, do a video conferencing, etc.

 

With the internet connection available worldwide, dependency on technology has become a must even in the medical field. The concept of ‘Online doctors’ have revolutionized the medical industry which has improved the business opportunities in the medical field to a great extent. Each day a new concept is introduced, the world takes less time to adopt it.

 

People are moving more towards technology as each day passes leading to a situation where people look for the best medical technology for their treatments. From the Doctor’s side, technology can help you bring up your patient care and from the patient’s side, it’s the eye for painless and quick treatments for which they are ready to spend money. Gone are the days where you waste your time at home after a surgery which stresses you to ‘evolve’ with technology.

 

Days are not far where the gap between technology and medicine will be filled. The advent of technology will make the connection stronger in such a way that both will move hand-in-hand and the power of technology will create further revolutions in the medical industry. If you are an early bird you gain more expertise to meet the challenges in the future.

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Wearable Health Devices For Stress Management.

Wearable Health Devices For Stress Management. | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Designed by a team at Washington University, Mindset is a stress management app being piloted in medical students.

 

With the rise of wearable health devices and health apps has come interest in figuring out ways to integrate all these data streams into meaningful signals that can be used to improve health. For example, one group is working on using wearables to help people quit smoking.

 

Stress affects all of us and for many people causes a lot of distress. A new health app is trying to use wearable health monitors to monitor for physiologic signals of stress so that users can manage their stress more effectively.

 

Mindset was developed by a group of medical and engineering students at Washington University of St. Louis. Created to help veterans and others manage stress on their own, Mindset incorporates principles of biofeedback into an Android and iOS health app, created with an advisory board of psychiatrists and psychologists. It’s currently in beta release form, with plans to incorporate functionality for data sharing with clinicians as it develops.

 

So how does Mindset work? In short, users must wear a supported activity monitor device while also keeping their phone in proximity. Once the phone notes signs of the user experiencing stress, primarily through heart rate monitoring, it will provide an alert.

 

Users can then select from a visually appealing menu of options over what they are feeling at the time, and then take steps to reduce their symptoms. Various exercises are included, with gamification of stress management provided through points obtained for heart rate reduction and so on. The developers have built the app with the belief that making people more aware of their emotions is a key step in self-management of stress.

 

On the surface, it sounds fantastic, but is this really something that clinicians could recommend to their patients? The developers have mentioned including a monthly subscription fee, and having actual clinical evidence that this app works is imperative before even considering a medical treatment app.

 

Mindset is undergoing investigational testing, currently on medical students, both with and without the device, with self-reported stress levels being analyzed. Adding more robust measurements, and clinically significant outcomes measurements are important

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Mobile healthcare technology makes NIH list of 14 goals for the next 5 years

Mobile healthcare technology makes NIH list of 14 goals for the next 5 years | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

The National Institutes of Health revealed its roster of ambitious goals for the next five years and many of them are either focused on reliant upon technologies.

 

 

Calling these "extraordinary opportunities that demand exceptional attention," NIH created them as part of its overall objectives to advance biomedical research, foster innovation and enhance scientific stewardship.

 

 

Here are the 14 goals:

 

  1. Apply precision medicine to cancer treatments
  2. Usher a vaccine for multiple flu strains through clinical trials
  3. Support research to develop interventions that promote health in populations disparities
  4. Harness pharmacogenomics in clinical settings will to improve outcomes
  5. Trial HIV vaccine in The Republic of South Africa in 2016
  6. Demonstrate via clinical trials that at least 6 interventions believed clinically viable actually do not work
  7. Revolutionize drug screening and optimization with radical approach to structural biology
  8. Support research into FDA-approved therapies for 12 or more rare diseases
  9. Provide rigorous evidence that mobile technologies can enhance health and prevent disease
  10. Support the development of a wearable biosensor that tracks blood-alcohol levels in real-time to prevent related injury and disease
  11. Support technologies that reverse paralysis and restore functions for spinal cord injuries
  12. Back the work to create vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus
  13. Research artificial pancreas for better management of diabetes
  14. Become the model agency for applying the scientific method to itself for supporting biomedical research

 

"Much remains to be done," said NIsco.lt/...H Director Francis S. Collins, in a statement. "This strategic plan will guide our efforts to turn scientific discoveries into better health, while upholding our responsibility to be wise stewards of the resources provided by the American people."

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3 Ways Technology Can Help Treat Patients as Consumers

3 Ways Technology Can Help Treat Patients as Consumers | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Smarter. Faster. More connected. On demand. These are the global trends that are redefining and revolutionizing every industry – and healthcare is just getting started. Today, consumers can choose to comparison shop, read reviews, crowd source recommendations for just about everything, instantly. And as consumers increasingly bear the burden of their healthcare costs, patients are starting to approach their healthcare decisions in the same way. Hence, it is critical for healthcare systems to proactively manage both the patient experience and their expectations, to increase patient loyalty, sustain the provider’s brand reputation and prevent new entrants into healthcare from siphoning patients away.

 

 

Technology can play a key role in meeting the needs of both patients/consumers and healthcare system organizations. Here are a few vital areas.

 

 

1. Transparency

 

Consumer expectations are on the rise and patients are paying more attention to their healthcare costs. As of January 2015, 19.7 million Americans had high-deductible health plans making them responsible for the first $2,000 to $5,000 of their healthcare spending. Even for those not participating in high-deductible plans, out-of-pocket costs rose substantially. From 2009 to 2015, on average, deductibles rose from $680 to $1,200. It is important to note that the business of healthcare is not exactly like other markets. While financial responsibility may encourage individuals to be more discerning about services that are optional or variably priced, it may also provide an impediment to care when needed. Regardless, it is a reality, and one of the current strategies to provide some level of health insurance coverage to everyone.

 

 

Moreover, transparent marketplaces in other industries— from Airbnb to Uber—are changing consumer expectations, at a time when health systems are under increasing competition for patient loyalty. CMS, along with consumer and employer demands are elevating the need for pricing that is clear, complete and accessible. Some health systems are responding by playing offense; many are investing to meet expectations.

 

 

One common patient pain point is the bill paying experience. According to a Consumer Reports National Research Center survey, in the last two years, nearly one third of Americans with private health insurance were surprised when their insurer paid less than expected, leaving a larger-than-expected bill for the patient. As described by one family, “We just wish that a doctor's office would give us a reliable statement at the time of service; we would rather be told to bring $1,000 or know up front that we can't afford this procedure. End of story.”

 

 

2. Real-time insights

 

In nearly every industry, there is a common challenge: “big data” is not enough to sort through the swirl of uncertainty and complexity in today’s modern society. To quote the Harvard sociologist, E. O. Wilson: “We are drowning in information, while starving for wisdom. The world henceforth will be run by synthesizers, people able to put together the right information at the right time, think critically about it, and make important choices wisely.” In healthcare, the deployment of technology and willingness of patients to engage in their care has led to a proliferation of data. The challenge; however, is in the synthesis – how do you glean actionable insights? In addition, are there ways to harness data previously unavailable from “non-clinical” sources?

 

 

In response, many health systems are revamping their online presence, as consumer-facing physician search and rating websites proliferate. Technology can also drive powerful results to improve patient experience and satisfaction. With real-time insights, providers can know how patients feel about their experience before they leave the hospital or doctor’s office. Patients can also offer perspective into health systems’ strengths and opportunity areas that can help provider organizations build patient loyalty and acquisition strategies.

 

 

One example where technology is offering new insights to improve patient experience is Binary Fountain. Binary Fountain offers a “social listening” tool that continuously monitors reviews, feedback, and mentions from the web and social media and integrates these insights with CAHPS data, point of care surveys, and other sources of patient feedback.  The solution offers a single platform where health systems can distill actionable insights to inform their operational decisions and patient experience strategies. The solution both enables health systems to address patients' needs and to take control of managing their brand.

 

 

3. Virtual access

 

Healthcare consumers increasingly seek out convenient and immediate access to care for common conditions. A 2014 survey of 3,873 patients conducted by the Advisory Board showed the number one priority for patients, when selecting a primary care clinic, was convenience. Over 70% rated I can walk in without an appointment and I’m guaranteed to be seen within 30 minutes as the attribute they sought most when seeking care. In 2013, Cisco performed an international study of attitudes regarding virtual care and found that 76% of individuals would prefer virtual care over a visit to an in-person provider, and showed while 19% of respondents preferred to visit a provider in-person, 23% preferred a consultation or visit by phone.

 

 

Seeking convenient access to care, patients have turned to non-traditional healthcare providers such as retail clinics and direct-to-consumer telehealth providers. As a result, health systems are losing both loyal patients and downstream referrals. However, offering convenient access requires a significant change in provider organization scheduling, workflow, clinic hours and staffing without disrupting clinic workflows or leading to physician burnout.

 

 

One company addressing this challenge head on is Bright.md. Bright.md's "SmartExam" is a virtual physician assistant that helps primary care groups automate up to 90% of provider time spent on low-acuity conditions. Using online exams that are easily accessible by both providers and patients, patients are able to interact with their own health system and trusted providers more efficiently.

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Windows 10 Ransomware Scam Represents Growing Trend in Malware

Windows 10 Ransomware Scam Represents Growing Trend in Malware | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

I don’t usually jump on the new software or device bandwagon immediately. I tend to wait until something has been on the market for a little while and let other people work the bugs out first. However, the release of Windows 10 intrigues me. I had the chance to talk to some people at RSA about it, and I’m not sure the last time I heard so much enthusiasm for a new Microsoft product.


The release came at the end of July, with the upgrade made available for free. Who doesn’t like free, right?

Consumers aren’t the only ones who appreciate a free upgrade, though. Scammers and bad guys are taking advantage of the Windows 10 launch, too, using phishing emails to spoof the arrival of the OS. As PC World explained, the scam does a very good job mimicking a legitimate Microsoft announcement regarding Windows 10. The difference, though, was this:


An attached .zip file purports to be a Windows 10 installer … the attachment contains a piece of ransomware called CTB-Locker that encrypts your files and requests payment within 96 hours, lets your files be encrypted forever.


I can’t imagine that anyone would be surprised that the bad guys would try to take advantage of the OS release. However, according to Cisco’s midyear report, using ransomware is part of a growing trend with hackers using social and breaking news events to deliver ransomware. According to the report, ransomware has really stepped up its game, with improved professional development to encourage innovation and to ensure that the malware brings in financial gains.

The Cisco blog explained more about how it works:


The ransoms demanded are usually affordable, generally a few hundred dollars depending on the bitcoin exchange rate. Criminals appear to have done their market research to determine the right price points for the best results: Fees are not so high that victims will refuse to pay or will tip of law enforcement. Ransomware authors keep their risk of detection low by using channels such as Tor and the Invisible Internet Project to communicate, and they use bitcoin so that financial transactions are difficult for law enforcement to trace.


Will we see more problems with ransomware going forward? I suspect the answer is “Yes,” especially as the developers get smarter about manipulating the ransom for their own gain. (Remember, as successful as Cryptolocker was at locking down a computer’s data, too many weren’t able to pay the ransom with Bitcoin, and, in turn, the developers weren’t able to make the money they planned to make.) We know that the spammers are very good at faking us out with phishing attacks. So enjoy your new Windows 10 upgrade. Just download with a lot of caution.

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5 advantages of cloud computing and how they can benefit your practice

5 advantages of cloud computing and how they can benefit your practice | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

While the specialty may vary, practices of all sizes across Australia are turning to the cloud to run their business. With the launch of Clinic to Cloud (C2C) in early 2015, over 1200+ healthcare professionals, operating from hundreds of different practices are now computing with our cloud-based platform. With new clinicians joining C2C daily, benefits of the cloud services are now being widely recognized and accepted as the norm.

 

So if you’re looking to open a new practice for the first time or hoping to migrate your existing practice to the cloud, let’s look at 5 advantages of cloud computing and how your practice can benefit:

 1. Staying in touch

Cloud computing is storing and securely interacting with data over the internet, rather than your computer or local server. That puts connectivity and real-time data as the clearest advantage of working on the cloud. Yes, someone changed the WIFI password without telling you or the careless construction worker nearby didn’t check before drilling. However, one can argue that servers fail and files get lost. The internet is truly an essential resource, which is why it has become so readily accessible and available from multiple sources, smartphone, portable WIFI device, personal connection, net hubs at cafes, offices and even some commercial planes will essentially keep you connected.

 

What does this mean for the clinician? Not only that your data is stored in state of the art datacentres, as long as you are connected, but you can also run your practice.  Control you practice on-site, from home, hospital, on break at your favorite café or even on the flight to your next medical conference from a desktop or mobile device. Full connectivity anytime, anywhere – this is the cloud.

 

  1. Tools of the Trade

Smartphones, tablets, and ultrabooks are essential tools for any busy working professional. With top cloud services offering dedicated mobile apps, working on the go also means working with your indispensable devices. Like the stethoscope to the physician or the scalpel to the surgeon – The Clinic to Cloud App gives you the tools to stay conveniently connected with your practice whilst on the go. For time-poor clinicians, buying time during your super busy schedule comes from having your entire practice visible from your smartphone.

 

  1. That new software smell

Top cloud providers are regularly updating and improving their software. The moment updates are released, they are made available for the benefit of all customers. You would have noticed those design changes and new features on your social media account without you manually needing to install or upgrade anything. Simply log in and updates are there. Clinic to Cloud follows suit, we typically update every 3 to 4 weeks to better user outcomes and reduce practice costs. On release date, all our subscribers then benefit with the best part being at no extra cost. For the clinician - you are not wasting time having to update your practice software or pay for often expensive IT support to run updates. It’s cloud and it’s simple.

 

  1. Soft on the Wallet

Moving to the cloud can save you large capital expenditure, as you do not have to purchase expensive servers and other I.T hardware to host your data or run your software. Accessing your cloud application, in many cases, simply requires an internet capable device (smartphone, tablet, or computer) and an internet connection. Not to mention, local servers also have expensive on-going maintenance and repair costs and backup requirements as well. Clinic to Cloud does not require complex IT infrastructure and server equipment with messy cabling disrupting the feng shui of your practice. A modern desktop or laptop computer and you are on your way to the clouds.

 

  1. Security and Data

One of the concerns with Cloud is typically security and many are concerned about the safety of Cloud hosted software applications. Although we understand the feelings behind the concern, studies have shown that the cloud is safer than on-premise servers that are susceptible to virus and hardware failure and data loss daily. Cloud solutions can be compared to Airline travel; they remain the safest way to do business.  At Clinic to Cloud, we have taken additional security measures such as to Factor Authentication and high levels of encryption.

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8 Health IT Trends to Watch

8 Health IT Trends to Watch | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

“We’re in the middle of an incredible moment in the healthcare industry, where expectations and standards are shifting.”

 

That statement was part of the opening remarks from Cerner’s Senior Vice President of Population Health John Glaser at the 2017 Cerner Health Conference. His position was a strong one: The industry, he says, is shifting from reactive sick care to proactive health management, from fragmented niche care to a cross-continuum care system and from reward for volume to reward for quality, efficiency, and safety.

 

Today, we’re watching as the physician, long considered to be at the center of the healthcare universe, is moving aside in favor of the consumer.

 

These shifts aren’t happening in a vacuum: They’re touching in every area of the industry, and they are reshaping the way the business of healthcare is done. Here’s a look at some of the top trends that will push the industry forward in 2018.

 

Consumer-centered health care


We talked a lot about the rise of consumerism in health care over the last year, and that train is not going to slow down in 2018. Increasingly, we're seeing people wanting to have a more active role in managing their own health and care (this is particularly clear when we consider the rise of mobile health apps and wearables). They expect the same level of information, detail, and options that they have in other industries when it comes to making purchase decisions, and there is a rising call for data transparency and access.

 

While there have been some great strides toward empowering the individual with healthcare organizations working to improve the patient experience, we're still waiting for the healthcare industry to wholly adapt to the needs of the consumer.

 

At Cerner, we recognize this as a new era, where the consumer will, at last, join their own health care team. That's why, at this year's CHC, Cerner President Zane Burke announced that we’re making a free consumer-directed health record available within our clients’ enterprise portals, providing individuals more control over how their data is used and shared. Each patient will have his or her information compiled on their behalf and can direct the use of that information to create their own experience.

 

The era of the consumer is here – and it’s time for the healthcare industry to embrace that.

 

IoT


From controlling the thermostat on your phone to monitoring your health with technology, the Internet of Things (IoT) is transforming the way we work, live and interact with the world around us. IoT has been a popular phrase in health care for the past few years, but today, the conversation is shifting. The primary issue now is understanding how we can take the plethora of big data available from connected systems and tailor it to provide person-centric care.

 

Moving forward, we need to harness the potential of IoT to drive better efficiencies. From a data collection perspective, the advantages of connected medical devices are vast. When we can provide data bridges from disparate health care systems within a single organization, we’re making critical patient information more accessible to clinicians and care teams and ultimately impacting patient outcomes.

 

Through the use of IoT devices, we have the opportunity to deliver true virtual care for chronic condition management, virtual visits, and other care coordination activities to streamline and benefit the patient. Connected devices enable more real-time insights and health status for a person.

 

“IoT is tied to consumer enablement, which ranges from remote patient monitoring to mobile applications,” Hamilton says, “and it certainly includes the ever-increasing trend of telehealth, which isn’t going to go away.”

 

Artificial Intelligence


“Intelligence isn't a new idea,” Glaser said at CHC. Our cars tell us when the oil is low, and they’ve been doing that for years. But we’re about to take a significant leap in the intelligence of our devices. We’re already seeing this with products from companies like AWS, Azure, and Google.

 

We're in the early stages of seeing how artificial intelligence will play out in the healthcare industry. One example is in precision medicine, an approach for disease treatment and prevention that accounts for individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person. This approach relies heavily on big data analytics, where machine learning algorithms and precision molecular tools make it possible to understand the mechanisms of disease and match up individual problems with personalized treatments. The implications for genomics and precision oncology are significant.

 

We’re also beginning to see AI algorithms affect and enhance medical imaging. These algorithms find patterns in images, identifying specific anatomical markers and scoping details that the human eye can’t – while simultaneously combing through a patient’s history, helping clinicians make efficient and quick diagnoses. The future of AI in health care won’t see clinicians being replaced by machines but rather empowered by them.

 

Big Data


“Data is the new oil,” Andreas Weigend, Amazon's former Chief Scientist, said recently. It’s a bold statement, but he has a point: Big data and cloud technology are changing how we interact with data, and previously untapped data sources are now attainable.

 

One of the greatest examples of big data’s implications for the healthcare industry is in predictive analytics, where data is used to identify behavior patterns in a patient or population and forecast outcomes. For example, when EHR data is organized into meaningful groups, such as social determinant factors, it can help predict hospital readmissions and can shed some insight on strategies to improve readmission rates.

 

This power to affect additional value and efficiencies within a hospital setting is no small thing. Perhaps most critically, these newfound big data insights are pushed to those that can make a difference: clinicians and care team members. Acute and ambulatory decision support, for example, can be enhanced by creating an empowered care team with a clear picture of the patient, thanks to increased access to patient data that's built directly into the existing daily workflows. And big data has exciting implications for precision medicine.

 

Whatever route organizations hoping to take with big data, it's clear that it will be a catalyst for change for the better good and health of society.

 

Data governance


As organizations begin to share data across departments and with other health systems, there can be a few questions: Who owns this data? Have the appropriate parties consented to its release? What are the rules, conditions, and terms of data sharing?

 

“Data governance is a huge thing that organizations are struggling with right now, even as they try to solve for it,” says Hamilton. In a recent survey, only 44 percent of hospital leaders said they had data governance capability across their entire organization, while 56 percent said they had inefficient governance standards.

 

What organizations really need is a governance strategy that everyone understands and can abide by, Hamilton says. In the future, we’ll see more and more healthcare organizations looking for help from external experts to create and refine their data governance protocol and practices.

 

Open platform development and API usage expansion


Open data access and increased interoperability are continuing to clear the road for development in health IT (HIT) – particularly when it comes to academic medical centers and rural health care systems. This trend will only continue to grow as open standards, like SMART Health IT and the HL7 FHIR standard, encourage a new level of collaboration and innovation.

 

As the FHIR standard matures, we’re going to see an explosion of new apps that can integrate with EHRs to help improve workflow efficiencies and achieve better outcomes. Application programming interfaces (APIs) offer direct programming access to the underlying health IT system and enable 'app' developers to create tools that can ingest EHR data and provide new services to consumers.

 

In a previous blog post, Cerner's Dr. David McCallie discussed how, through projects like SMART® on FHIR®, providers are becoming familiar with APIs that support customization of the EHR experience. However, API access is not limited to providers. A new class of APIs will give consumers the ability to access their health information on demand via apps of their choice. These APIs are emerging thanks to consumer demand, and they are also driven by major regulations coming into effect – particularly Meaningful Use Stage 3.

 

Consumer-directed access will place control of personal health information in the consumers' hands. APIs that allow the transfer of discrete data will help drive the advancement of interoperability by delivering more specific data where it makes sense within the workflow, in a way that positively impacts outcomes.

 

UX and health IT


On the coattails of the rise of consumerism in health care is a growing emphasis on integrating user-centered design into healthcare products and solutions. To optimize any solution, user experience (UX) must be engineered in at every step of the solution design process. This way, the experience for the HIT user – be they a clinician or a patient – should meet or exceed their expectations.

 

Cerner's Vice President of User Experience, Paul Weaver, discusses the integration of UX design thinking and health IT through the example of mobile health apps. "When you think about consumer apps today, there is a huge amount of competition to get people's attention," Weaver says. "If you search for a notes app on the Apple store, for example, there's probably a few hundred for you to choose from. So, if I'm an app developer, how do I design the app of choice?"

 

The answer, Weaver says, is by providing a quality user experience.

 

"In the health space, historically, this has been a little bit of a walled garden," he adds. "You go to a health provider, and they give you a link to the app they want you to use, and there's no choice in the matter." It's the responsibility of the UX team to think about that application in the context of all their other solutions available so that whatever they're designing sits alongside its contemporaries in an equal level of quality.

 

UX is about more than just creating user-friendly applications. It’s a state of mind – a perspective that favors taking a human-centered approach to creating solutions. "That's what we're starting to achieve here," Weaver says, "and we're on the cusp of it becoming real for our end users, which is fantastic. How there be anything more exciting than an application that actually helps your health?"

 

Payer-provider convergence


One of the most significant trends in today’s market is the blurring of roles between providers and payers. As the industry shifts toward value-based care, it should become increasingly easy for payers and providers to collaborate at the point of care. A person’s relevant medical history, including medications and treatment plan, should be available to both the healthcare provider and payer – that way the patient’s insurance benefits are included in the provider network and are in sync. Shared access to this data means that clinicians are empowered to provide the right care at the right time to the right patient.

 

That’s payer-provider convergence in theory – but the reality is that there are two dynamics happening in tandem.

 

“You've got providers trying to take on characteristics of a payer because they’re doing at-risk relationships, and you’re seeing the payers making a direct play into the provider market,” says Ryan Hamilton, Cerner’s Senior Vice President of Population Health. Recent moves, such as UnitedHealth’s Optum purchasing DaVita Medical Group and Amazon’s push into pharmaceutical distribution, suggest that the trend of payers and providers merging together will continue to rise.

 

Along the same lines, there’s a lot of interest right now around provider network management – and that focus is only expected to grow. “How you actually recruit, manage and maintain a high-quality network of providers is and will continue to be a huge focus for our client base,” Hamilton says.

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Keep Your Appointments Afloat! 

Keep Your Appointments Afloat!  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Summer can be a busy time for sailing and boating businesses as people flock to the beach, bays, rivers and lakes for a fun day on the water. Online scheduling software from Appointment-Plus can be the perfect partner for operators looking to spend less time booking reservations and more time on the water with their customers.

 

Used by businesses coast to coast for scheduling sailing lessons and booking boat rental reservations, Appointment-Plus helps these operations automate and streamline their appointment-setting procedures with such functionality as online self-scheduling, which allows customers to view availability and book their lessons and reservations online, 24 hours a day; automated e-mail and text message reminders, which inform customers of their upcoming appointments and reservations; accurate recordkeeping and report-generating features; and e-marketing capabilities for sending current and past customers information on specials, discounts and other news.

 

“Sailing and boating businesses provide fantastic recreational opportunities for individuals and families throughout the nation,” says Jeff Fleming, marketing director at Appointment-Plus. “Our software helps automate and streamline the entire appointment- and reservation-scheduling process, allowing them to spend more time focused on their operations and their customers.”

 

A Software as a Service (SaaS) application, Appointment-Plus is Web-based and accessible from any Internet connection. This gives operators the ability to access their scheduling calendar from outside of their home or office. Additionally, Appointment-Plus does not require a Web site, expensive hardware or time-consuming installations to use. Pricing starts at $39 per month with no long-term contracts and free set-up assistance with a dedicated coach.

 

Businesses that utilize the online self-scheduling feature can expect a significant drop in the number of phone calls from customers looking to book appointments and check availability. This functionality is especially beneficial if the operator does not have an office or receptionist and routinely takes phone calls at the dock or on the water while giving lessons.

 

“Just think of the convenience of allowing your customers to schedule their lessons or reserve their watercraft at any hour of the day and at their own convenience,” Fleming adds. “Plus, you’ll spend less time answering the phone call and returning messages.”

 

Appointment-Plus supplies almost 4,000 clients throughout the United States, Canada and 10 other countries the tools they need to schedule customer and patient appointment times, book rooms, accept registrations and many other services. Geared primarily toward small businesses such as doctors’ offices, spas, health clubs and massage therapists, users of the service also include Fortune 500 companies; colleges and universities; healthcare agencies and facilities; federal and local government; and freight and delivery companies.

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Doctors Software for Clinic Management  

Doctors Software for Clinic Management   | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Clinic business is extra complicated than ever, with Doctors Software for Clinic Management, you get easy solutions for each part of your routine work, from scheduling appointments to billing. We take care of your business by providing the perfect solution so you take care of your patients more efficiently. Doctors Software for Clinic Management was designed with the help of a medical doctor and clinic staff to make it a fit choice for your working environment. Our Doctor’s module is easy to use. Connection with Labs, Pharmacies and more, make your work easy and quick and it works the way you work.

 

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is an efficient and automatic way of dealing with health facility with options like Doctor’s appointments, administrative activities, patient’s treatment history, diagnostics information, and billing, etc. Doctor’s software for clinic management is good for a hospital with single/multiple locations. It was developed keeping in mind the small and medium-size polyclinics too, and the focus was especially on portability and ease of use. Doctors Software for Clinic Management covers most of the standard features often found in software made for clinics or hospitals.

 

Ease of use, manageability, multi-user functionality, the fast information retrieving in Doctors Software for Clinic Management are exemplary as compared to other such programs. Deciding to use Doctors Software program based on the cloud platform is very cost effective for the clinics. Doctors Sofware for Clinic Management is a good choice for the small as well as huge hospitals or clinic setup. It requires no much expenditure on equipment, hardware or trained IT staff. Those are the resources that a health facility, assisting an in-house IT setup to have to utilize, which are costly. This optimized Doctors Software for Clinic Management is updated, configured and maintained within the cloud through the skilled IT professionals. The users are, hence, free from the burden. It results in price saving and the staff pays attention to the main functions of the Clinic.

 

Easy to use, and Efficient

Doctors Software for Clinic Management gives rapid, simple and easy solutions for the Hospitals or Clinics to manage daily tasks. It allows for streamlining report generation, inventory management, patient management, employee’s attendance and other tasks. Doctors Software for Clinic Management smoothly integrates with your workflow. This cloud-based software program easily distinguishes scheduling for different physicians and a simple interface that consists of tabs for speedy switching across different features and functions. With these features, an easy to use patient portal, detailed reporting, and customizable workflow, Doctors Software for Clinic Management covers the various aspects of clinic management and administration.

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is very easy to use, and effective software program to control the management process of clinic or hospital. This Software Program is one of the best for individual Doctor Clinic or a hospital. In case you are looking for easy to apply and easy to keep software in your clinic or small health center, this software program is best for you. At a very affordable price, you not only get the software but also free training and support from our company.

A Product of EVision Techno Services

Doctors Software for Clinic Management is a Module of EVision’s Hospital Management System.

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7 Must-Have Features For Your Medical Clinic Website

7 Must-Have Features For Your Medical Clinic Website | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

In 2016, we are all plagued with an overabundance of information. For most of us, we want to find out only specifically what we need to know, and ignore the rest.

This is especially true for patients who are searching for a doctor online. According to the Pew Research Center, 80% of Internet users look for health information online, including 44% who search for physicians or health professionals.

 

When a patient visits your medical clinic website, they really want three things:

 

-To find out the important details they need to visit
-To feel in control of their experience
-To get a sense of who you are, and see if they trust you

With this in mind, here are 7 essentials you need to have an engaging, attractive medical website:

 

1. Patient Forms 



Make it easy for patients to schedule appointments, register and access important forms before they arrive at your office. Placing the registration form under a “New Patient” tab will make it easy to find.

 

2. News and Updates

Refreshing your site with recent news and updates will help build an online presence and allow patients to feel comfortable that their doctor is up to date on current issues. It will also help your practice rank higher in search engines, making it easier to find.

 

3. Contact Information

Prominently display contact information on every page, preferably in the top right corner, or at the bottom of the screen in the footer. Ensure also that you have entered your details onto Google Maps so that your clinic is showing up in location searches.

 

4. Patient Resources 



Providing patients with valuable content on popular health topics and link to trusted resources to give your patients the most up-to-date facts available. If there is a recent topic that is concerning people, you can also provide some general tips on these. This will help you build trust with your patients and show you as an up-to-date expert.

 

5. Services, Insurances, Payment Options

Most visitors will be interested what services you provide or insurances you accept. Making this information easy to find by having tabs at the top of the screen listing ‘Services’ and ‘Insurance’. You can also note whether there are special financial arrangements available, and whether you take cash.

 

6. Mobile Friendly Interface

According to an article by Search Engine Land, more searches now occur on mobile devices than any other platform. For this reason, your website should be viewable on all mobile browsers. Most website templates these days offer a mobile view, so this is not usually an issue, but is very important that your website is easy to navigate on a cellphone as it is on a computer screen.

 

7. Social media links and plugins. 



In a recent article by Forbes it was shown that Facebook now drives more online traffic than google searches. By having clearly displayed links to web site to your clinic’s Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn and YouTube channel if you have any or all of these.

 

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The Healthcare Internet Of Things: Becoming A Reality

The Healthcare Internet Of Things: Becoming A Reality | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Technology is becoming more sophisticated:

 

 As connectivity expands, new mobile devices and wearables – that offer far more sophisticated biometric, fitness and wellness tracking – are entering the market. For example, these more advanced technologies are tracking and reading muscle activity; utilizing spectrometers to measure nutrition in food; keeping tabs on electroencephalogram (EEG) levels; and measuring exposure to ultraviolet light. What is even more interesting, however, is the fact that consumer electronics, wearables and clinical devices are continuing to take on new physical forms – including digital tattoos, under-skin implants and smart contact lenses.

 

Additionally, devices are beginning to better communicate with one another, as we build out interoperable networks. This is the key principle behind the Internet of Things, in general. The possibilities for this growing interconnected network of devices are endless and include:

 

  • Connected refrigerators monitoring food input and output;
  • Connected thermostats that self-adjust temperatures to body heat metrics;
  • Televisions that can connect to real-time data dashboards breaking down your health and recommending consultations with your physician, dietician, therapist or personal trainer;
  • Light bulbs that automatically adjust the emission of UV light to stress levels and time of day.

As these innovative technologies collect a broader array of clinical and fitness data, the information gathered is becoming even more vital for health care companies.

 

Data is being integrated and converging to create a holistic picture. Devices passively capturing more data (biometric, activity, etc.) will continue to integrate together to give a comprehensive overview of a person’s health. In the future, when bringing together biometric data with detailed activity data that extends far beyond what wearables and devices currently offer, insights not previously thought possible will emerge.

 

For example, data from a car related to erratic driving combined with speech patterns from a smartphone can provide detailed insights on a person’s stress level. Taken a step further, analytics programs could integrate that data to help predict a manic episode in a person with mental health issues.

 

Technology partnerships are proliferating. Technology partnerships are vital to creating an interconnected world of devices and interoperability.  Companies are relying on specialized technology vendors to add increased capabilities to their products instead of building it all on their own. Case in point: Polo Ralph Lauren created a connected t-shirt. But the company did not build the sensor technology that already exists. Instead, they focused on their core competency, apparel, and partnered with a technology vendor to add the health tracking sensors.

 

Non-technical and consumer companies will continue to partner with technology companies to add health-focused capabilities to their product or services. We have seen these partnerships are regularly emerging with phone companies, sports teams and automotive companies. 

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Healthcare IT Is Getting Sexy & Fashionable 

Healthcare IT Is Getting Sexy & Fashionable  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Many of us have been following the wearable industry in healthcare.  Many of us have been influencing the wearable industry in healthcare.  Whichever the case, it’s true that HealthIT is getting sexier each day.

 

Some people will wear gadgets because of the practicality of them.  For example, some wear watches because it gives them the current time and date.  

 

Others wear watches because they make them look cool or rich.  And others do it for both reasons.

I belong to the latter group.  I like the practicality of the wearable but I also like the looks.

 

As of today, I’ve owned most of the modern wearables: Fitbit, Moto 360 and several Samsung Gear devices.

 

The Fitbit is OK but it’s still not a gadget I can show off.  Moto 360 is the one I hide under my sleeve in order to not be perceived as an eccentric geek (which I am).

 

There are few health management apps on it but I’m expecting them to grow.  Personally, I’m creating an app for diabetes self-management.  Of course, I am not going to market this app due to regulatory restrictions but I’ll try to get it into a proper product development work stream in the near future.

 

But like everything in technology that breaks bad:  I just can’t wait to see what the Apple iWatch will look like.  But it must be the sexiest thing in the world of gadgets.

 

Apple did it with the music gadgets.  Remember the Walkman?  Apple turned it into the sexy iPod.  Remember the Blackberry?  Apple turned it into the sexy iPhone.

 

I can bet on this fact:  Get the people to wear the gadget because it’s cool and sexy and then all other applications of it will follow through.

 

But don’t ever think that your cool and sexy health application will on its own be adopted if it doesn’t help conquer the next loved one!

 

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Is TeleMedicine the future of healthcare ?

Is TeleMedicine the future of healthcare ? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

A 61 year old man comes into the room complaining of his feet slowly changing shades to a brownish red.  On examination there is swelling of both feet, the marks are scattered brown flecks on otherwise normal colored feet, however it is definitely spreading from the toes upwards.

 

The doctor will collect a history, which tells us that the patient had an Inguinal hernia procedure three years ago, it was corrected by placing a mesh to keep things in place.

 

There is also history of a Transient Ischemic Attack ( Stroke ) two years ago, this was handled by blood thinners.  The patient remembers being allergic to one of them.

 

Carrying on the examination the heart and lungs are fine, all nerve reflexes are in place and the patient has sensation on the tips of toes on both feet.  Circulation is also fine.

 

If the patient has his records things like these become important;

 

  1. Which medicine was he allergic to

 

  1. How was the mesh placed, do the scans show any slipping

 

  1. Blood clotting variation ( INR/PT/PTT blood tests ). Given that the patient had a stroke these would be regularly monitored.

 

  1. Any infections in the area and what antibiotics were used to treat them.

 

If he doesn’t have records, then the diagnosis can still be made to a skin deposing of iron, not before things like a venous Doppler, MRI of the lower leg, and a few other inconclusive tests will be done.  Chances are the dermatologist will be one of the last people consulted if the records are not at hand.

 

Medicine is the integration of clinical practice as a doctor would see it with the story each patient presents.  Telemedicine takes this entire interface and places it online for easier access, diagnosis, something that can be working twenty four hours a day, anywhere in the world if so needed.

 

The integration of various parts of healthcare are becoming more and more important now that there is so much travel, leading to different doctors and scattered records.

 

Most important of all, now diagnostic medicine has developed a virtual arm where a complete health capsule of the patient can be portrayed, making for peace of mind to distant loved ones or even a second opinion from a family doctor.  All it takes is internet access to lead to better diagnosis wherever a person is.

 

It is often important for doctors to know the past history of a patient.  Knowing things like the last series of blood test results makes it easier for doctors anywhere to monitor and adjust doses for things like diabetes, hypertension, cholesterol etc. medication.  This often gives people the security to travel in peace.

 

Healthcare is an ever changing thing, and often not one we can plan.  Telemedicine helps a little in that area by keeping a complete set of your records online. This makes things easier for the entire healthcare community, not just the doctor.

 

In case of emergencies it is good for the nearest hospital to have prearranged access to your records.  Paper degrades, ECG’s will fade away within a year.  Good health goes on a lot longer.

 

There are several reasons why Telemedicine is the wave of the future.  To summarize here are a few scenarios where it would be of use.

 

 

  1. Elderly parents in another city.
  2. Chronic disorders like diabetes, hypertension, where the medical records become the size of novels.
  3. Emergencies for things like blood group, allergies, current medication assuming the patient is not conscious.
  4. Frequent travelers with issues that need monitoring.
  5. Second opinions from doctors in different cities.

 

From a doctors perspective it is important to focus on the complaint which the patient has currently, it is however invaluable to have the history on hand for all the reasons above.  This leads to quicker diagnosis.

 

The advantage of quicker diagnosis is quicker treatment, the advantage of quicker treatment is that the wear and tear on the body while treating the problem is reduced.

 

If a diabetic can be monitored better no matter where he or she travels then the chances of long term damage to the eyes, kidneys or other sensitive organs are dramatically reduced.

 

Where does telemedicine fit into all this?  It’s best compared to traffic policemen at intersections of the doctor, pharmacy, laboratory and hospitals.  Making sure the right information is being passed on from one to the other. Reducing the chances that the wrong dose of medicine isn’t given in a different city or that all tests in the long lists of blood tests are done.

 

Healthcare is a serious business, there are always new pillars being added to the foundations of good health and the quicker easier access of personal health data in a secure manner is definitely one of these pillars.  It will save lives.

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Telemedicine – Benefits And Challenges. 

Telemedicine – Benefits And Challenges.  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Telemedicine benefits when your patients are remotely located, you have a unique expertise or you want to add a secondary service to your medical group. The concept of tele-health is spreading faster than expected and the American College of Physicians is giving advice to doctors who connect with patients remotely.

 

The position of ACP for telemedicine in 2016 includes cautions, challenges and benefits for primary care doctors using Telemedicine.  If your medical group is thinking of reaching patients through this new technology, the following points are recommended for a better understanding;

 

  •  Make sure the liability insurance covers telemedicine
  • Start with established patients
  • Offer the same standard of care as in personal encounters

    Some of the challenges are,

  • Difficulties in obtaining multiple licenses across state lines

  • Challenges about how insurance will pay for telemedicine

  • Lack of definition of Telemedicine

 

Telemedicine should not be adopted because it is trendy. As the ACP puts it: “ACP believes that physicians should use their professional judgment about whether the use of telemedicine is appropriate for a patient. Physicians should not compromise their ethical obligation to deliver clinically appropriate care for the sake of new technology adoption.”

 

Telemedicine ensures greater patient convenience (no travel is required) and a consultation facility for people who might otherwise not get care (no specialty doctors in their area) through e-visits. Telemedicine also offers savings for hospitals, physicians and other providers. To be precise, physicians use telemedicine services to decrease the distance with their patients, because more telemedicine services also offer around the clock service.

 

According to HIMSS, “Telemedicine offers a great deal of promise in its ability to provide medical services to populations unable to obtain them”. Other potential advantages of telemedicine include monitoring prescription compliance, management of chronic conditions and asynchronous communication (specialists can verify images or lab results over phone, which only requires the patient and the doctor to be present at a specific time).

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 How has telemedicine technology changed in recent years?

 How has telemedicine technology changed in recent years? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

New advances in technology and an increased adoption of online social interactions are helping create new clinical opportunities through the use of telemedicine. Even in the early 1990's when telemedicine was being used by healthcare practitioners for mostly pilot projects, the vision may have outpaced the technology. Computers were still cumbersome and expensive, and the internet was still finding its footing.

 

 

Today, however, the telemedicine industry is thriving as technological advances and the ubiquity of connected devices have made it possible to help physicians and their patients communicate through video conferencing. As a result, getting treatment has become easier and more relaxed, and for millions of individuals and families living in rural or remote communities, there are new opportunities to receive high-quality healthcare. The development of new technologies and simplified IT infrastructures have fueled this trend.

 

 

Technology that is sleek and mobile


In the past, hospitals and doctor's offices that employed telemedicine needed to dedicate a good amount of space and bandwidth to get online. This set-up was cumbersome and far from efficient. Today, the technology that powers telemedicine is portable and doctors can use computers and tablets, while patients are also aided by devices that fit in a convenient cart or package that is fully mobile.

 

These increases in efficiency have been at the forefront of making telemedicine an everyday clinical solution. Now that the technological barriers have been lowered, the applications related to treating patients in rural communities as well as around the world are being full realized. 

 

 

Internet everywhere


Another important development in helping telemedicine reach its full potential is the growth in everyday internet use. For patients and doctors, getting online is easier and less expensive now more than ever.

 

When it comes to connecting a hospital in an urban center to a rural clinic, having a reliable web connection is critical. In the past, this may have required expensive installations or proven to be an impediment to full connectivity, but as internet access has spread, so too has the possible reach of telemedicine services. 

 

It isn't just remote areas of the U.S. that are being positively affected by the spread of the internet. Around the world, rural care centers can bypass traditional infrastructure and connect to the web to get high-quality healthcare. The website Internet Live Stats reported that 3.4 billion people now have access to a web connection. 

 

The ability to communicate through video conferencing and send pertinent patient data in real-time is critical for telemedicine, and as the world becomes a more connected place, there are more and more opportunities for medical professionals to reach new patients.

 

 

Comfort and familiarity


The Pew Research Center found that in the U.S., 64 percent of adults owned a smartphone in 2015, and less than 10 percent of American households had limited access to the internet. Technological familiarity and literacy is helping patients and doctors feel more comfortable or less apprehensive about using telemedicine than they might have been when the industry was just getting started.

 

Because most people are now prolific in navigating online portals or video chatting with friends and family, the experience of having a remote check-up with a doctor is easy and feels natural. This makes things easier for patients and physicians, as well as nurses, paramedics or clinic staff members who facilitate telemedicine appointments. An easy-to-use interface gives all parties involved the means to navigate the platform in a way that is meaningful and adaptive.

 

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Structured Electronic Medical Records in Healthcare Sector Saves Lives and Reduces Costs

Structured Electronic Medical Records in Healthcare Sector Saves Lives and Reduces Costs | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Last decade witnessed tremendous proliferation in volume and variety of data, across various business domains. Nowadays, not just banking & finance, but every other industry generate and collect gazillion of data, on daily basis. This perhaps provides a very strong reason for businesses to adopt a data-driven and data-reliant approach, and Healthcare, Insurance and Life Science industry are not an exception. They have very well understood that deciphering data unlocks valuable insights, and thus culminating into well-informed decisions.

Global healthcare industry is experiencing a fundamental transformation; it is becoming more competitive in nature. Healthcare Providers, Physicians/Doctors, Consultants, Patient Account Manager, Electronic Medical Records Manager, Medical Records Coding Manager and all across the health care fraternity are working towards not just improving the quality of life and avoid the preventable ailments, but have also realized that they need to leverage the profit margins and reduce overheads – very fast.

Rise in data through various sources like data entry and scanning

Unprecedented rise in data has become a common phenomenon across healthcare industry. Medical facilities constantly generate and accumulate enormous records. Some of it is recorded by manual data entry or scanning of medical documents like clinical history of the patient, insurance claims, bills, prescriptions, etc. Moreover; newer sources of data like biometric sensor readings and other wearable devices have fueled the data-influx.

The data that is collected for years mostly ends up as files, stashed in manila folders, stored onto shelves, and, over a period of time getting locked in warehouses. Apparently, this information is often worthless, since it is outdated, irrelevant and even redundant records. Needless to say, instead of an opportunity, data adds to the already challenging scenario. That’s why most organizations take assistance of experienced data processing experts, since they have the professional competency to manage huge data-sets. Raw and incoherent data gets processed, indexed into standardized formats and converted into easily consumable formats like tables, charts, graphs, dashboards and much more for better data visualization.

How data indexing and data processing helps?

Fragmented and unstructured data results into a vague and hazy picture, making the medicos to end up wrong diagnosis. But this situation can be avoided.

Well-structured medical records, known as Structured EMR (Electronic Medical Records) make it easy for patient account managers, health information managers and many more to see a complete picture of the patient’s conditions. The legacy of benefits continues for insurance companies, actuarial analysts, claims departments and many more.

These structured electronic medical records enables easy access to patient’s past clinical history and treatments – conveniently, to develop a clear diagnosis of the medical condition, while controlling costs. They also are a valuable source of information which can be used for analysis and can be retrieved throughout the course of treatment like in emergency departments, inpatient records, therapies, and outpatient care. Moreover, processed claims data provides great insight about the public health and other research studies. With claims data, we can get answers for questions like:

  • Who received care based on the demographics of population?
  • What are the healthcare settings most people prefer to use?
  • Which are major categories and types of medical care delivered?

Now, with the overwhelming number of wearable smart sensors entering into the market, monitoring ones vitals in real-time has become a reality.

With wellness trackers like Fitbit, Sensogram and so on, monitoring vital signs and receiving valuable information for a healthy and effective workout, has become easy. The biosensor technology have a sophisticated data collection system, which reads, transmits, and stores the parameters like:

  • Blood pressure
  • Respiration rate
  • Heart rate
  • Hydration
  • EKG – electrocardiogram

Since, the device captures the above mentioned vitals, in disintegrated manner, correlating and predicting the any medical complications, becomes a daunting task. However, when this raw data is processed, accessing and analyzing the data becomes quick and less-complicated and thus create enhanced healthcare facilities and balance rising cost factors.

Availability of well-structured and non-fragmented real-time vital data can drastically cut down the development of chronic illness, such heart attacks or strokes. Medicos can take swift actions and formulate appropriate treatments to prevent these ailments even before they show up.

With world population going up and rising average life-expectancy, models of treatments are rapidly changing, and some decisions behind these changes are data driven. Actionable data leverages the medical facilities and quality of treatment, which is in accordance to physical and mental health of every individual.

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Netflix Is Dumping Anti-Virus, Presages Death Of An Industry

Netflix Is Dumping Anti-Virus, Presages Death Of An Industry | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

For years, nails have been hammering down on the coffin of anti-virus. But none have really put the beast to bed. An industry founded in the 1980s, a time when John McAfee was known as a pioneer rather than a tequila-downing rascal, has survived despite the rise of umpteen firms who claim to offer services that eradicate the need for anti-virus.

Now, however, movie streaming titan Netflix NFLX +7.34% is hammering a rather significant nail in that old coffin, one that could well lead to the industry’s final interment. Because Netflix, a well-known innovator in the tech sphere, is the first major web firm to openly dump its anti-virus, FORBES has learned. And where Netflix goes, others often follow; just look at the massive uptick of public cloud usage in recent years, following the company’s major investment in Amazon Web Services.


Let’s take a second to look at the decline of the anti-virus industry. Anti-virus has been the first line of defence for many firms over the last quarter of a century. Generally speaking, AV relies on malware signatures and behavioural analysis to uncover threats to people’s PCs and smartphones. But in the last 10 years, research has indicated AV is rarely successful in detecting smart malware. In 2014, Lastline Labs discovered only 51 per cent of AV scanners were able to detect new malware samples.

Despite its shortcomings, many are still required to keep hold of their AV product because they’re required to by compliance laws, in particular PCI DSS, the regulation covering payment card protections. There’s also the argument that AV is necessary to pick up the “background noise”, as Quocirca analyst Bob Tarzey describes it. “Despite more and more targeted attacks, random viruses are still rife and traditional AV is still good at dealing with these,” he claims. Major players, includingSymantec SYMC +5.00% and Kaspersky, continue to make significant sums, even if results aren’t stellar.


But it’s now possible to dump anti-virus altogether, and Netflix is about to prove it. The firm has found a vendor that covers those compliance demands in the form of SentinelOne. As SentinelOne CEO Tomer Weingarten told me, his firm was given third-party certification from the independent AV-TEST Institute, validating it can do just what anti-virus does in terms of protecting against known threats, whilst providing “an additional new layer of advanced threat protection”. Its end-point security doesn’t rely on signatures, it monitors every process on a device to check for irregularities and does not perform on-system scans or require massive updates like anti-virus, Weingarten said.


“Large enterprises are recognizing that anti-virus is not adding a lot of value to their security posture. Instead of just bolting on more and more layers, companies are looking for ways to reuse their anti-virus budget to achieve better security,” he added.


And that’s what Netflix has done. “It was three years ago we were doing a re-evaluation of anti-virus and out evaluation said that anti-virus is dead, so we’ve been trumpeting that for years,” Rob Fry, Netflix senior security architect, told FORBES. “The problem was there wasn’t really a replacement at the time. Fast-forward three years and now there’s next-generation everything. Then the next question is: how mature are they?


“The direction we decided to go was with a company called SentinelOne, who we’ve been working with for year and a half. They were a true replacement for end-point protection.

“We’re in the process of leaving anti-virus. We did not renew our anti-virus contract this year.”


He complained of poor support from his anti-virus provider, whom he chose not to name, noting Netflix simply “chose the one that sucked the least”. “The AV piece wasn’t even the most valuable thing, it was the URL filtering,” he added, referring to the blocking of malicious websites Netflix staff were visiting whilst on the corporate network.

For any CISOs out there, they’ll need some more convincing that SentinelOne really can do the job of finding low and high-grade malware. Aside from the AV-TEST Institute certification, there’s little in the way of third-party analysis of the company’s kit.


Skeptics on the death of anti-virus will have their voices heard too. “I don’t believe the era of anti-virus software is dead but that we need to evolve the technologies and other defences we use to properly address the variety and sophistication of the threats we face,” noted Brian Honan, security consultant.


But Netflix is unlikely to listen to naysayers. And it isn’t taking it easy on so-called “next-generation” kit either. In recent years, it decided to ditch FireEye, considered a major player in the post-AV anti-malware game. That’s not because of the quality of protection the firm offers, however, but the lack of application programming interfaces (APIs), Fry said.


APIs allow Netflix to hook up its various security systems so they worked concomitantly and could feed on each others’ data to provide more advanced security. When Fry goes looking for fresh vendors, there are two musts: a cloud strategy and APIs. As FireEye wasn’t willing to provide them at the time, Netflix moved over to ProtectWise, another advanced attack detection company, he told FORBES.

A FireEye spokesperson noted that since early 2014 FireEye has had a “rich, secure, documented and formally supported” API across the majority of its products. “These APIs are used by a broad selection of end-customers, reseller/managed service and technology integration partners,” they added.


What’s apparent with the spate of major cyberattacks seen this year, from Ashley Madison to Hacking Team TISI +% and theUS government, the world’s biggest firms are demanding more from the companies that have tried and failed to adequately protect them

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