IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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The Technology Used to Create Dentures is Improving

The Technology Used to Create Dentures is Improving | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

It’s important to make sure that you’re using the most up-to-date technology when you create dentures for the patients at your improving dental practice. Your patients will expect the best when it comes to their dentures, which will improve patient satisfaction considerably.

 

WHICH NEW TECHNOLOGIES ARE BEING USED TO CREATE BETTER DENTURES?

 

Sophisticated computer software is being used to help dentists create better molds of a patient’s mouth, which allows dentists to create dentures that are more similar to natural teeth. As a result, they’re likely to allow patients to eat a wider range of foods and last for a longer period of time.

 

In addition, the latest software helps dentists perform more effective scans of a patient’s mouth. This allows a patient’s mouth to be modeled in three dimensions, which can greatly improve the quality of dentures that they’re able to produce.

 

That’s because these scans allow dental care providers to see areas of the mouth that would otherwise be difficult to observe.

 

Furthermore, the materials that are used to create dentures have improved over the years. They have become much stronger, which makes it possible for patients to eat a wider range of foods. Furthermore, the materials that are used to create today’s dentures are longer-lasting as well.

 

Also, advanced polymers can now be used to hold dentures in place, which can allow patients to eat a wider range of foods.

 

WHAT CAN WE EXPECT FOR THE FUTURE OF DENTURES TECHNOLOGY?

 

As time goes on, computer technology that’s used by dental practices will become far more advanced. Also, the materials that are used to make dentures are likely to improve as well.

 

This will dramatically improve the quality of dentures that can be produced, which will greatly improve patient satisfaction.

 

Not only will the materials used to make the dentures themselves improve, but the quality of the materials used to hold dentures in place will improve as well.

 

This will help to prevent patients from having the experience of discovering that their dentures come out when they eat certain types of foods, which will allow you to provide dentures that patients are more satisfied with than ever!

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Leveraging Data Lakes

Leveraging Data Lakes | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

What is a Data Lake?

In the early days of modern computation, computers of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s would collect data from physical repositories (cards, keyboard input, and tapes) and deal with it in memory, meaning a virtual environment.

 

In the late 1970s, computers started to cluster data for processing within worksheet alike structures, the grandfather of DataBases.

 

DataBases were to follow and the logic behind it was for data to be input in a logical manner according to previous human classification, so although raw data (in the sense it hadn’t been previously treated) went into the Database tables, the decision of what would fit where and why was based on human criteria.

 

Databases are in fact a limited tool since they require specific contexts, meaning there is a Database for Accounting Data which must be a distinct entity than the Database for Logistics Data (although they may need to connect and have mutual referencing structures).

 

So, most of the Systems and Tools under operation today, still have their own Database structures that interconnect and exchange data towards creating added value information.

 

The Database evolved to larger clusters of alike data, which are the Data Warehouses and, although the process may somehow differ, Data is grouped in the same manner while pertaining to a given common context.

 

With the event of BigData (for Data tends to grow, exponentially), plus nowadays innovation in data handling/ processing tools, we have reached a stage where large flows of several types of Data may be channeled into extremely large data repositories (Data Lakes), in an ad-hoc manner which nevertheless allows correlation to be established under pre-defined “schema” wherefrom to extract meaningful information.

 

The main leverage of Data Lakes pertains the following characteristics:

  • While Data Warehouses store structured already processed Data, Data Lakes also store semi or unstructured as well as completely raw and (apparently) unrelated data. And, no … it’s not a waste of time and space since most times relationships are only found after processing.
  • Data Warehouses architecture implies expensive large data volumes whereas Data Lakes are specifically designed for low-cost
  • Data Warehouses obey by a pre-defined structure in which data is stored (pre-defined data classes and families), while Data Lakes have great flexibility towards dynamic structural configuration. And that is more the manner in which humans apprehend information and think.
  • Data which goes into Data Warehouses is mature (it has a clearly defined context), yet Data Lakes store Data that is still maturing (still finding its place in the overall context).
 
Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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3D Printing In Dentistry

3D Printing In Dentistry | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

At one point in time, the idea of replicating three-dimensional models of various objects by a machine would seem like science fiction.

 

Today, 3D printing technology has penetrated its way into the field of dentistry and is proving to be a force to be reckoned with.

 

Dental Practice Compliance has even endorsed its use

 

EXAMPLES OF 3D PRINTING IN DIFFERENT FIELDS OF DENTISTRY

 

• ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

 

Oral and maxillofacial surgery is very complex and requires high precision. With 3D printing, a dentist can generate the patient’s information through imaging and scanning.

 

With that information, a dentist can create a digital 3D model of the affected area that has to be operated on.

 

The digital models will help a dentist to properly analyze the part that is going to be operated on before commencing the surgery. A 3D model can be printed to help the dentist create cutting drills that will be used for the surgery.

 

A surgical guide will also be developed from the 3D models to ensure neighboring muscles and bones are not damaged during the surgery on the affected area.

 

To ensure perfection, a dentist can practice the same surgery on the 3D models before going to the actual patient.

 

• PROSTHODONTICS

 

Artificial parts are required to replace missing parts of a person’s tooth, skull or jawbone, and they are normally referred to as prostheses.

 

They can be made from a wide range of materials like silicon and porcelain. The teeth of the patient’s parents are scanned with small cameras to create a 3D model of a jaw.

 

This 3D jaw is then used to create a flawless prosthesis for the teeth that were damaged or missing.

 

• ROOT CANAL

 

Root canal infections are usually examined with X-rays by a dentist, which only give them a one-sided view.

 

However, with 3D imaging and scanning, a dentist is able to look at the roots from a multi-directional perspective.

 

This gives them a better understanding of the problem and how to solve it. 3D-printed root canal guides assist in the removal of the pulp tissue that was damaged, thus providing accurate results.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
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inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
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Ransomware: The Right Response

Ransomware: The Right Response | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

So-called ransomware attacks are on the rise, namely because targeted businesses are increasingly willing to negotiate with - and even pay - their extortionists.


Ransomware has been getting a lot of media attention of late. On April 1, security firm Trend Micro reported that since the beginning of the year, numerous variants of crypto-ransomware have been discovered in the wild, striking consumers and businesses throughout the world.

 Criminals rarely hold up their end of the bargain, so negotiating with anyone who is demanding a ransom is just a bad idea. 


Just weeks earlier, security firms FireEye and Bitdefender issued warnings about new ransomware trends that were making these attacks more difficult to thwart and detect.


Now experts are calling attention to one of the reasons why ransomware attacks are becoming more common - because organizations say they'd rather not deal with the fallout that trails a breach or cyber-attack that goes public. Instead of getting law enforcement involved, they'd rather try their hands at making deals with their attackers first.


But paying ransom is short-sighted and is never a good idea. Why? Because cybercriminals rarely keep their end of the bargain. Organizations that negotiate with hackers often end up with lost data after paying a hefty ransom.


Lance James, who heads up cyber-intelligence at consultancy Deloitte & Touche, says most businesses that pay ransoms never have their data restored or their encrypted files decrypted.


During his presentation at Information Security Media Group's Fraud Summit in Atlanta, James discussed ransomware cases he has investigated. He noted that in most of those cases, businesses paid the ransom and then the attackers disappeared, never fulfilling their end of the negotiating bargain.


Of course, organizations should prepare for these types of attacks by taking steps now to ensure they have data and drive backups, and that they have strong multifactor authentication requirements for access to servers, in the event an employee's credentials are hijacked during one of these attacks.


But businesses also need to spend more time educating their staff about how ransomware attacks work, why these attacks are waged, and why reporting these attacks to law enforcement, rather than trying to handle them internally, is so critical.

The Attack Strategy

Ransomware attacks are waged in two parts. First, a PC or mobile device is infected with malware that locks the corporate user out or encrypts files so that the user can longer access them. Then a ransom is demanded through an automated message that appears on the device's screen. The user is told he or she has a limited amount of time to pay the ransom before the device will be wiped clean or the files will be erased.


The tools for these attacks are easy to buy and technical support for waging the attacks is inexpensive.


Law enforcement agencies, such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, have advised consumers and businesses to immediately report ransomware schemes when they occur.


But security researchers say that, despite of those warnings, many businesses are opting to either pay the ransom or are engaging in direct negotiations with their attackers instead of getting the authorities involved.

Willingness to Negotiate

A new study from cyber-intelligence firm ThreatTrack Security finds that 40 percent of security professionals believe their organizations have been targeted by a ransomware attack. Of those that believe they've been targeted, 55 percent say that when under attack, they are willing to negotiate a ransom in exchange for the release of corporate data or files.


ThreatTrack's research also finds that one in three security pros would recommend to upper management that their companies negotiate a ransom to see if they could avoid public disclosure of a breach involving stolen data or files that have been encrypted as part of the attack.


In fact, 66 percent of those surveyed by ThreatTrack say they fear negative reactions from customers and/or employees whose data was compromised in a breach if those customers or employees were to learn that their organizations chose not to negotiate with cybercriminals for the return of data.


ThreatTrack's survey includes responses from 250 U.S. security professionals at companies with 500 to 2,500 employees.

Beware of a Quick Fix

When it comes to ransomware attacks waged against corporations, many victimized organizations see paying the criminals what they want as the easiest way to make the problem go away.


But criminals rarely hold up their end of the bargain, so negotiating with anyone who is demanding a ransom is just a bad idea.

Obviously, more education, from the CEO down to the employee, is needed. But we also need a shift in the corporate culture, with an emphasis on looking beyond a "quick fix" for avoiding breach publicity.

Information sharing with peers can play a critical role as well. The more we talk about these attacks and share the techniques used, the more we can learn about how to defend our networks and shield our employees from falling victim to the phishing schemes that are often used to infect systems in the first place.


Security vendors need to step up their efforts here, too. Rather than just supplying intrusion detection, they also need to provide some good-old-fashioned education.

Ivan Garcia-Hidalgo's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:33 PM

Ransomware: The Right Response #InfoSec #cybersecurity