IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Are medical devices a security risk for your healthcare organization?

Are medical devices a security risk for your healthcare organization? | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Medical organizations are taking advantage of the IoT (Internet of Things) with Medical Devices

Your medical organization likely implements hundreds to thousands of class 3 medical devices every year.  From heart monitors to hip implants, these devices are amazing innovations that are extending and improving quality of life.  These devices come equipped with features like wireless connectivity and remote monitoring which allow for noninvasive adjustments which reduces the cost, risk and frequency of visits for the patient.

 

What are the risks associated with Medical Devices? 

As a healthcare organization implementing these devices, it is also extremely important for you to understand the risks associated with these devices.

Many manufacturers lack the technical skills required to implement security controls.  Security must be a collaborative effort between manufacturers and hospital systems.  New devices arriving in hospitals were designed at least 5-6 years ago.  Comparatively, if you connect a computer from that long ago to the internet, you can expect compromise within 10 minutes without security software or updates.  What's more, some wearable devices may be implanted for 15 years on average causing a huge security risk for the patient.

Medical devices currently lack the capacity to detect threats.  It is difficult to integrate security controls into medical devices because of their critical function.  In many cases, the medical device will continue to be used even if a security flaw is detected because healthcare providers have no alternative option, the device is required to manage the patient’s health.

The FDA does provide guidance regarding medical devices, but it is not enforcing regulations.  The FDA wants manufacturers to focus on the safety and functionality of these devices instead of putting the burden of compliance on them.  A high profile case involving a pacemaker administered by Saint Jude Medical was actually the first case of a FDA recall of a medical device in 2017.  This was their first major move since issuing an alert for cyber risks of infusion pumps in 2015 which led to their guidance for medical devices in 2016.

Are you taking steps to protect your patients and organization while using medical devices?

Security risk is a patient safety issue.  Medical devices implanted into your patients carry their data and perform critical functions to maintain patient’s lives.  Loss or alteration of patient data could also present an issue to your patient’s health as they can be denied coverage or treatment as a result.  As a healthcare organization it is your responsibility to monitor your healthcare devices and their security as well.

The responsibility of maintaining medical device security is shared among manufacturers, hospitals and IT professionals.  The first step hospitals can take to ensure patient safety with medical devices is to work with manufacturers who adhere to FDA Cybersecurity guidelines.  Always ask your manufacturer about Cyber security.  Hospitals should adopt a testing schedule for medical devices.  Knowing which devices are in use, and what potential security risks these devices may have can lower the chance of problems occurring once they have been implanted. 

Many hospitals have their CIOs overseeing medical device management, not hospital IT, this means that clinical or biomedical engineering staff with little understanding of cybersecurity risks are connecting and monitoring medical devices on hospital networks.  As demonstrated time and again, medical devices can be used as an entry point into the hospital network, to reprogram and execute patients or even hold them at ransom.

T professionals at hospitals need to think differently about medical devices in the IoT than they do about their hospital network security.  Consider how the medical device and EMR are identifying the patient, this protects the data as it is transmitted.  Use security, authentication and access controls to confirm the patient's identity to ensure the data cannot be altered.  Always use devices which capture date and timestamps so the provider knows when the data was gathered. Data transmission protocols should be adopted per device.  You may manually transmit data from the patient's device during a visit or automatically transmit that data via the internet.  Encryption should always be used to protect data transmissions.

By being proactive regarding your medical device management, you are preparing for security risks that may arise.  

 

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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What is involved in telemedicine and how much does it cost? 

What is involved in telemedicine and how much does it cost?  | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Now that the use of telemedicine is surging to an all-time high, organizations can easily get lost in implementing the technology just to stay on top of the latest and greatest, but it is easy to get lost in the vast amount of telemedicine technology and equipment options available.

If you are researching your telemedicine options, applying for a grant or just need to put your budget plans together, here are six key elements and associated costs for you to consider.

1. Medical Devices for Specialties

The specific medical devices you need may vary depending on the specialties you plan to serve with telemedicine. The good news is you don't need to have all the answers right away because many equipment providers have scalable and modular telemedicine systems. This means you can purchase just what you need to get started and then add additional devices later on as your program expands into additional specialties. 

The cost of medical devices for basic primary care services can range from $5,000-$10,000, and this would include devices such as an examination camera, ENT scope and digital stethoscope.

2. Communication Platform and Video Conferencing Needs

How you plan to manage the patient-to-remote encounter is also a key component to consider for clinical telemedicine applications. Since you are communicating a patient's critical diagnostic data, the optimal choice is to do it securely and in real time. After all, the beauty of telemedicine is the functionality to have a live interaction between a patient and a remote specialist.

 

AMD Telemedicine recommends using a Web-based encounter management portal to communicate and aggregate medical device data and share it live with the remote physician. This is truly the best way to offer telemedicine services that are as close to an in-person visit as possible. For video conferencing, it is best to first evaluate any video conferencing investments your organization might have already made to see if these can be leveraged for your current application. Many times they integrate seamlessly with encounter management platforms.

Depending on your video conferencing needs, you can complement a Web-based telemedicine portal with either software- or hardware-based video conferencing. To go the software-based route can cost as little as $1,500 per patient site with no cost for the remote provider. The cost for hardware-based video conferencing can start around $10,000 per patient site and increases with the number of remote provider sites you need.

3. Packaging Design and Mobility

Telemedicine carts, cases, wall mounts and other equipment are all just various ways to package the telemedicine hardware and software. Although there is a difference in how aesthetically pleasing they are (or are not), the main thing to keep in mind is whether this packaging will fulfill your intended use, not just now but also in the near future.

Ideally, you want a telemedicine cart or case that is modular and can be easily configured for additional medical specialties so it can evolve with your program. For some applications, such as school-based health centers or long-term care facilities, it is helpful to select a telemedicine system that is an all-in-one package. This helps streamline the purchasing, maintenance, and support for those that don't have a dedicated IT team for their telemedicine programs. All-in-one telemedicine systems that include the telemedicine software, primary care medical devices and the mobile cart/case can range from $20,000 to upward of $28,000.

4. Bandwidth and Internet Connection Recommendations

You may be pleased to know that you don't need to invest in a significant infrastructure overhaul to make telemedicine a reality for your clinic. Of course, your specific needs will vary depending on factors such as location and size or your organization, but the most important consideration is not how much bandwidth you need, but rather how reliable and consistent your bandwidth is.

The most common Internet connections are shared with others, which can cause the upload and download speeds to lag and be interrupted at busy times. So finding a reputable Internet service provider with a commitment to reliable service is the first step. If possible, purchase a business-grade service so you experience a more consistent bandwidth capability to ensure your real-time data is not interrupted or compromised in any way.

5. Training

You already staff your organization or practice with top-notch doctors and nurses, so the next step is to provide these healthcare professionals with the skills and knowledge they need to best make use of your new telemedicine technology in daily operations.

Fortunately, clinical telemedicine equipment training isn't a complicated need to meet, especially if your staff has any familiarity with basic medical devices and modern communication technology. There are two types of training programs to ensure the long-term success of clinical telemedicine programs: user training for clinicians and nurses, and technical training and installation for the IT staff. Training programs like these can range from $200 to $2,000 per site depending on the complexity of equipment, a number of users and other factors. Additionally, the American Telemedicine Association is a fantastic resource for training and education.

6. Support

Finally, the increased reliance on network connectivity and Internet technology at your office means that you'll need to ensure that you have adequate IT staff support. This is likely more of a concern for smaller practices that may not have an in-house IT department. It's a good idea to talk to your telemedicine vendor to determine if it provides installation services, as well as what technical support options are available if you don't have an IT staff of your own.

Navigating the waters of telemedicine can be much easier with the help of industry experts working alongside you and your clinic's employees.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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