IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Microsoft's Surface Hub will cost up to $19,999 when it ships in September

Microsoft's Surface Hub will cost up to $19,999 when it ships in September | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

If there was any doubt that Microsoft’s Surface Hub computers were strictly for deep-pocketed businesses, the asking price should clear things up.


Microsoft will charge $19,999 for the 84-inch, 4K version of the Surface Hub. For businesses on a tighter budget, a 55-inch version with a 1080p display will cost $6,999. Pre-orders will begin on July 1, and of course, both models will have Windows 10 on board when they ship in September.


What good is a giant, wall-mounted, touchscreen PC? Aside from running all the usual Windows applications, Microsoft has designed the device around office collaboration. It comes with two pressure-sensitive pens, and lights up a whiteboard in OneNote when someone takes a pen from its magnetic holster. The touchscreen supports 100 touch points, so several people can interact with the display at once.


The Surface Hub also has some slick tools for teleconferencing. It has two wide-angle 1080p cameras inside for picking up an entire room of attendees, and depth sensors for figuring out who’s in the room and where to direct the microphones. Anything drawn on the whiteboard can show up in real time on employees’ computer screens, and they can also beam their screen content back to the Surface Hub using Miracast.


As for tech specs, the Surface Hub has fourth-generation Intel Core processors (i5 for the smaller model, i7 for the larger), Intel HD 4600 or NVIDIA Quadro K2200 graphics, 128GB of solid state storage, 8GB of RAM, four USB ports (USB 3.0 for two of them), Bluetooth 4.0, 802.11n Wi-Fi, and gigabit Ethernet. The smaller model weighs 105 pounds, while the larger weighs a whopping 280 pounds.


Microsoft will sell the Hub exclusively through major enterprise hardware distributors in 24 markets. But you may not need a well-endowed business to check it out yourself;Engadget reports that it’ll eventually be on display in Microsoft Stores.


Why this matters: Microsoft isn’t the only one making jumbo touch PCs for enterprises. InFocus, for instance, has been producing similar devices in its MondoPad and BigTouchlines for years, and in many cases for less money. The difference with the Surface Hub is its focus on collaboration, with a marriage of hardware and software that other companies won’t be able to pull off. It could be worth a little extra cash if it lives up to the promise of less excruciating meetings.

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There are seven different versions of Windows 10

There are seven different versions of Windows 10 | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Microsoft's big sales pitch with Windows 10 is that it's one platform, with one consistent experience and one app store to get your software from.


But when it comes to buying the actual product, there will be seven different versions, Microsoft says in a blog post

Here they are:


  • Windows 10 Home, which is the most basic PC version.
  • Windows 10 Pro, which has touch features and is meant to work on two-in-one devices like laptop/tablet combinations, as well as some additional features to control how software updates get installed — important in the workplace. 
  • Windows 10 Enterprise, which will have extra management features. We have some ideas of pricing here, as Microsoft is touting a $7/month Windows 10 Enterprise subscription for businesses that also includes a bunch of juicy, lucrative cloud services
  • Windows 10 Mobile for smartphones. 
  • Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise, which is like the one above, but with more business management features. 
  • Windows 10 Education, which is optimized for schools.
  • Windows 10 IoT Core, which is for robots, smart sensors, and — well, if you need it, you'll know it.


There's very little reason to stress here.


The important thing to know is that if you're a consumer using Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, or Windows Phone 8.1,  you're get a free upgrade to the equivalent version of Windows 10, so long as you take the plunge in the first year


So, for example, if you're using Windows 8 Home Edition, you're going to have the option of upgrading to Windows 10 Home Edition.

All of these versions of Windows 10 include the good stuff, like the new Microsoft Edge browser that's replacing Internet Explorer, digital assistant Cortana, and the new password-less Windows Hello login system. And Microsoft is promising Universal Apps that work across the whole range of devices, from phone to PC and back. 


And if you take Microsoft up on its free offer, you get the upgrade to the right version automatically. 


But for something that's supposed to be a massive departure, this list of Windows 10 versions sure seems to be business as usual for customers.


For developers, the fact that it's all Windows 10 on the backend makes it easier to develop apps once and make them available to everybody, everywhere. But for the actual users, this range of Windows 10 versions is annoying at best, even if it's an annoyance that Microsoft customers are used to.  


The other massive caveat here is that we don't know Windows 10 pricing outside of the free upgrade offer — so if you want to go from Windows 8 Home to Windows 10 Pro, for example, we don't know for sure how much that would cost you. Free just isn't always free. 


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Windows Phone is now officially Windows Mobile again

Microsoft started dropping the Windows Phone brand back in September, and now we have its official replacement. The software maker has revealed today that the equivalent to Windows Phone for the Windows 10 era is simply "Windows 10 Mobile." If you’ve been paying attention to Microsoft’s mobile efforts over the years, then you’ll know that’s a straight return to the Windows Mobile days. Microsoft used a variety of names for Windows Mobile, including Windows Mobile 2003, Windows Mobile 5, and Windows Mobile 6 before switching to Windows Phone for version 7.

While the new name isn’t simply Windows Mobile, thanks to the 10 numbering, it’s still a return to the old days of Windows Mobile especially if Microsoft does choose to ship a Windows 11 or Windows 12 in the future. After a confusing mix of names over more than 15 years, Microsoft has finally settled on the name it used the most. Windows Mobile makes a lot more sense than Windows Phone these days, especially as the operating system will span across phones and tablets, but it's still not really the Windows as we know it today. Microsoft is trying to change that with universal apps across all devices, but for most Windows is still Windows on PCs and laptops.

Either way, welcome back old Windows Mobile friend, the circle is complete.


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