IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
32.1K views | +1 today
Follow
IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scoop.it!

Windows Phone is now officially Windows Mobile again

Microsoft started dropping the Windows Phone brand back in September, and now we have its official replacement. The software maker has revealed today that the equivalent to Windows Phone for the Windows 10 era is simply "Windows 10 Mobile." If you’ve been paying attention to Microsoft’s mobile efforts over the years, then you’ll know that’s a straight return to the Windows Mobile days. Microsoft used a variety of names for Windows Mobile, including Windows Mobile 2003, Windows Mobile 5, and Windows Mobile 6 before switching to Windows Phone for version 7.

While the new name isn’t simply Windows Mobile, thanks to the 10 numbering, it’s still a return to the old days of Windows Mobile especially if Microsoft does choose to ship a Windows 11 or Windows 12 in the future. After a confusing mix of names over more than 15 years, Microsoft has finally settled on the name it used the most. Windows Mobile makes a lot more sense than Windows Phone these days, especially as the operating system will span across phones and tablets, but it's still not really the Windows as we know it today. Microsoft is trying to change that with universal apps across all devices, but for most Windows is still Windows on PCs and laptops.

Either way, welcome back old Windows Mobile friend, the circle is complete.


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Why Mobile Cloud Will Become the Great Disruptor

Why Mobile Cloud Will Become the Great Disruptor | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

One by one, more industries are being disrupted by the strategic use of mobile and cloud technology plays, as savvy new competitors seek ways to shift consumer preference to favor their online digital offering.

The emerging Mobile Cloud phenomena will eventually disrupt the enterprise IT arena. Meanwhile, it will certainly continue to change the dynamics of the video entertainment sector.

According to latest worldwide market study by The NPD Group, mobile gamers -- those who play on a smartphone, iPod touch, or tablet -- are playing more often, and for longer periods of time, than they were two years ago.

The study uncovered that the average time spent playing in a typical day has increased 57 percent to over two hours per day in 2014 versus one hour and 20 minutes in 2012.

The growth of the media tablet market has seen these devices become central to the mobile gaming story. New and improved devices enable the transformation of creative online gaming experiences.

Not only are they the devices that are being played on the most, but tablet gamers are also more likely to pay for games and to spend more money on average than gamers on other mobile platforms.

"Continued mobile growth will stem from existing customers paying more to play, especially in the free-to-play portion of the market," said Liam Callahan, industry analyst at www.npd.com/">https://www.npd.com/" target="_blank">NPD Group.

The average number of playing sessions are at their highest from ages 6 to 44. However, the average number of minutes per session peaks in the tween years, then falls through the teenage and early adult years.

As an example, children ages 2 to12 are spending the greatest proportion of their device time on gaming versus other activities. This age group is also playing more games (average of 5 games), as well as more games that were paid for (average of 3 games).

The average amount of money spent by this age group over the past 30 days on new games, and in-game purchases is also one of the highest, second only to mobile gamers in the 25 to 44 age group.

The majority of mobile gamers are also playing video games on other platforms or devices, with only one-in-five players being mobile-only gamers. That said, regardless of the number of devices used to play games, mobile devices have the greatest amount of play time.


more...
No comment yet.
Scoop.it!

Why Fraud Is Shifting to Mobile Devices

Why Fraud Is Shifting to Mobile Devices | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

As a result of the explosive growth in worldwide use of smart phones, mobile malware will play a much bigger role in fraud this year, predicts Daniel Cohen, who heads up the anti-fraud services group at security firm RSA, which just released its 2014 Cybercrime Roundup report.


Mobile devices will be the new focus for phishing attacks, taking the place of spam attacks that for more than a decade have been waged against PCs, Cohen, an expert on phishing trends, says in an interview with Information Security Media Group.

"Smart phone technology is the fastest adopted technology in the history of mankind," Cohen says. In 2014, 1.3 billion new smart phones were purchased by consumers throughout the world, while in 2015, forecasts suggest that another 2 billion of these devices will be shipped to consumers, he points out.

"The bad guys are looking at this ... and they understand that they have to be on those platforms and those systems," he says.

Security Challenges for Mobile

This shift to mobile fraud is posing challenges for security teams, because the methods used to protect end-users from attacks waged against PCs don't translate well for mobile, Cohen notes.

The mobile threat involves the use of what Cohen describes as "permission-ware." The end-user knowingly downloads mobile applications and gives those apps permission to run on his device, Cohen says. So when the app is malicious, the user determines the number of permissions that app will have once it's installed.

Cohen points to Svpeng, mobile ransomware identified by security firm Kaspersky Labs in summer 2014, as an example of the kind of threat that will become more common this year.

"Svpeng started out as a phishing attack on the mobile phone," Cohen says. "The app would wait for a legitimate app to launch, and once that app launched, the malicious app, Svpeng, would launch and then ask for more information. ... In 2015, we will see the mobile channel leveraged more and more in attacks like this."

In the interview, Cohen also discusses:

  • How the underground economy is evolving and fueling the rapid spread of malware and phishing attacks;
  • Why the U.S. continues to rank No. 1 for phishing attacks waged against banking brands; and
  • Why remote-access attacks waged against point-of-sale vendors are expected to increase this year.

At RSA, Cohen serves as the head of the anti-fraud services group, where he focuses on phishing attacks, malware and threat intelligence.


more...
No comment yet.