IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
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IT Support and Hardware for Clinics
News, Information and Updates on Hardware and IT Tools to help improve your Medical practice
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Servers In Medical Centres

Servers In Medical Centres | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Servers in medical centres are a common aspect if IT support & maintenance. Here’s a tip for Healthcare IT Support.

 

Some use a PC which is configured to act as a server, other healthcare organisations would have implemented a professional business grade server to store their medical applications and finally, some use cloud based server which are essentially virtual servers.

 

At some stage in the business’s lifecycle, the network or IT environment begins to slow down, become slightly unreliable and you hear more and more frustrations from the staff.

 

The typical knee jerk reaction will always be to reinvest into a new server and replace the old one. This can be an expensive, complex and frustrating exercise if its not completed by a dedicated healthcare IT professional.

 

In this blog we wanted to share something a little different; some strategies which will make your network more reliable, increase the lifecycle of your server and finally, help you save your money.

Our hot tips are:

 

Monthly Server Maintenance
By far the easiest and most important task. The monthly server maintenance can be implemented by your IT provider (or if you are interested, email us and we will give you the steps on how to do it).

The monthly maintenance includes installing all the new server operating system updates, the clinical software updates, updating your antivirus and third party software.

 

Other tasks include checking your disk space and removing any temporary files, rebooting the server and finally, deleting any unnecessary files in the downloads or documents folder.

This activity will ensure that your server is up to date and the reboot will run all the required servers correctly.

 

Upgrade Your Firmware Every 6 Months
We highly recommend you engage an IT professional for this activity. According to the world’s leading technology vendors, over 90% of hardware reliability issues are due to the lack of updating the machine’s firmware.

 

Firmware is a software product which managed the hardware of your server and it effects the way it behaves. By upgrading the firmware of your server, you are installing the latest updates, fixes and patches which directly relate to your server.

 

Some benefits of firmware updates include a faster server, less over heating, less server lockups and most importantly, a longer lifecycle.

 

Add More RAM & Hard Disk Space
When you purchased your server it would’ve had little load on it. Your staff numbers were limited and back then it didn’t have to support new updates.

 

As your clinic grows and the network requirements become more, your server will begin to feel the load. Its memory is now at full capacity and its working as hard as possible.

 

By upgrading the RAM and hard disk space (if you are not sure how to do it, contact your IT provider OR US), you are essentially giving your server more resources to handle the extra load.

This upgrade usually costs about 15% the price of a new server and in turn, saving you more money and giving your network more firepower.

 

Manage Your Backups Correctly
Running a backup is one of the most memory heavy tasks a server can do. A backup can take up all the memory and CPU power. Our strategy is to always ensure that the backup of your server and clinical data is running outside business hours. This way you won’t feel the network on the server.

 

Implement The Right Configurations
A very open term I know however configuring the server in the right way does play a big part on how it behaves when processing data and ensuring that your clinic staff can access their medical applications.

 

A simple example would be implementing an Active Directory role (technical I know however this is important). If your server is setup as an active directory then it can manage and facilitate how the users access the data in a more efficient way.

 

Another recommendation would be to setup your server as DHCP and DNS. This way when you access your clinical applications (Medical Director, Genie, Best Practice etc..) then the network computers can quickly find the server and locate the clinical database.

 

Check The Firewall Settings
Most of the connection issues (speed, reliability) relate to 3 core aspects, the quality of the connection between the computer and the server, the way the server is configured and finally, the way the firewall is configured.

 

Depending on which firewall solution you have in place, it needs to be configured correctly so that it allows undisturbed access to the clinical applications from the clinic’s computer.

 

If the firewall is not configured correctly then you will notice that the network will be slow, so will the server and finally, so will the clinical applications.

Technical Dr. Inc.'s insight:
Contact Details :

inquiry@technicaldr.com or 877-910-0004
www.technicaldr.com

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Destover: Destructive malware has links to attacks on South Korea

Destover: Destructive malware has links to attacks on South Korea | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

Backdoor.Destover, the destructive malware that was the subject of an FBI Flash Warning this week, shares several links to earlier attacks directed at targets in South Korea. Some samples of Destover report to a command-and-control (C&C) server that was also used by a version of Trojan.Volgmer crafted to attack South Korean targets. The shared C&C indicates that the same group may be behind both attacks.  

Volgmer is a targeted piece of malware, likely used by a single group, which has been used in limited attacks, possibly as a first stage reconnaissance tool. It can be used to gather system information and download further files for execution. Significantly, the version of Volgmer which shares a C&C with Destover was configured specifically to attack South Korean targets and will only run on Korean computers.

Destover also share some techniques and component names with the Jokra attacks against South Korea in 2013. However there is no hard evidence as yet to link the attacks and a copycat operation can’t be ruled out. Links also exist to the Shamoon Attacks, with both attackers using the same, commercially available drivers. However, in this instance it appears highly unlikely that the same group was behind both attacks and instead it would appear that the Destover attacks copied techniques from Shamoon.  

Destover in action
Destover is a particularly damaging form of malware that is capable of completely wiping an infected computer. It was the subject of an FBI Flash Warning earlier this week after at least one variant of it was understood to have been used in a high profile attack.

There are several malicious files associated with the FBI Destover report:

  • diskpartmg16.exe
  • net_ver.dat
  • igfxtrayex.exe
  • iissvr.exe

Diskpartmg16.exe is the first file that is created on an infected computer and, when executed, it creates the files net_ver.dat and igfxtrayex.exe.

When “diskpartmg16.exe” is run, it connects to a number of specific IP addresses within a set IP range, as well as computer names in the format “USSDIX[Machine Name]”. This indicates that this variant of Destover was not intended to be indiscriminate and the malware had instead been configured to only attack computers belonging to one particular organization.

The destructive payload of Destover is carried by igfxtrayex.exe. In certain instances, when run, it will:

  • Delete all files on fixed and remote drives
  • Modify the partition table
  • Install an additional module(iissvr.exe)
  • Connect to a number of IP addresses on ports 8080 and 8000.

Iissvr.exe, meanwhile, is a backdoor which listens on port 80. Once an attacker communicates with the compromised computer, this file displays a message, which reads:

 

“We’ve already warned you, and this is just a beginning.

We continue till our request be met.

We’ve obtained all your internal data including your secrets and top secrets.

If you don’t obey us, we’ll release data shown below to the world.

Determine what will you do till November the 24th, 11:00 PM(GMT).

Post an email address and the following sentence on your twitter and facebook, and we’ll contact the email address.

Thanks a lot to God’sApstls [sic] contributing your great effort to peace of the world.

And even if you just try to seek out who we are, all of your data will be released at once.”




Via Paulo Félix
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Sizing Up the Impact of Partial DHS Shutdown

Sizing Up the Impact of Partial DHS Shutdown | IT Support and Hardware for Clinics | Scoop.it

The expansion of some major federal government cybersecurity initiatives would be suspended if Congress does not fund the Department of Homeland Security by week's end, triggering a partial shutdown.

Initiatives to expand the Einstein 3 intrusion prevention and continuous diagnostic and mitigation programs to a number of federal civilian agencies would be placed on hold if Congress fails to come up with the money by Feb. 27, when a temporary DHS appropriation ends.

"A shutdown would prevent us from bringing aboard those [programs] and essentially stop those agencies from receiving the protection that they need from the cyberthreats out there," says Andy Ozment, DHS assistant secretary for cybersecurity and communications.

About 43 percent of the staff at the National Protection and Program Directorate - the DHS entity that oversees its cybersecurity programs - would be furloughed if Congress fails to enact funding legislation that President Obama would sign, according to an estimate by the Congressional Research Service. Ozment says that furlough figure includes 140 employees from the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, the DHS unit that coordinates cyberthreat information sharing with federal agencies; local, territorial, tribal and state governments; the private sector and international organizations.

Will Systems Be at Risk?

Although Ozment, in testimony earlier this month to a House panel, said the furloughs would have an adverse impact on the government's cybersecurity activities, he stopped short of saying federal IT systems would be placed at risk by a partial shutdown.

"Without these staff, the NCCIC's capacity to provide a timely response to agencies or critical infrastructure customers seeking assistance after a cybersecurity incidents would be decreased and we would be less able to conduct expedited technical analysis of cybersecurity threats," Ozment testified at a Feb. 12 hearing of the House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection and Security Technologies.

Funding DHS's cybersecurity initiatives - which has widespread support from among Democrats and Republicans in Congress - is caught up in a highly partisan political battle over President Obama's executive order to shield millions of illegal immigrants in the United States from deportation. The House in January passed a DHS appropriations bill that would fund most department programs, including those for cybersecurity, but withholds money from initiatives that would support Obama's executive action on immigration. With a threat of a Senate filibuster by Democratic members, as well as a presidential veto, the House bill has stalled in the upper chamber.

Lamentable But Not Perilous

Jason Healey, a cybersecurity expert at the think tank The Atlantic Council, says he doubts the failure to fund DHS cybersecurity initiatives would create significant risk to either government or critical private networks. "That seems like it's a lamentable thing that they can't continue [funding], but it doesn't worry me too much," he says, adding that other federal agencies work to help safeguard government networks and critical IT systems in the private sector, including the FBI.

Besides the temporary suspensions of the Einstein 3 and continuous diagnostic and mitigation programs, also known as continuous monitoring, Ozment said a partial shutdown would halt development of new programs to secure IT. "We would be unable to continue planning our next generation of information sharing capabilities that are necessary to make our information sharing real-time and automated in order to enable us to combat highly sophisticated cyberthreats," he said.


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